Biologging, remotely-sensed oceanography and the continuous plankton recorder reveal the environmental determinants of a seabird wintering hotspot

first_imgMarine environments are greatly affected by climate change, and understanding how this perturbation affects marine vertebrates is a major issue. In this context, it is essential to identify the environmental drivers of animal distribution. Here, we focused on the little auk (Alle alle), one of the world’s most numerous seabirds and a major component in Arctic food webs. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we show how little auks adopt specific migratory strategies and balance environmental constraints to optimize their energy budgets. Miniature electronic loggers indicate that after breeding, birds from East Greenland migrate >2000 km to overwinter in a restricted area off Newfoundland. Synoptic data available from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) indicate that this region harbours some of the highest densities of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus found in the North Atlantic during winter. Examination of large-scale climatic and oceanographic data suggests that little auks favour patches of high copepod abundance in areas where air temperature ranges from 0°C to 5°C. These results greatly advance our understanding of animal responses to extreme environmental constraints, and highlight that information on habitat preference is key to identifying critical areas for marine conservation.last_img read more

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HMS Victory in Need of a Makeover

first_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Victory in Need of a Makeover Equipment & technology UK’s oldest naval ship still in commission, HMS Victory, is facing it’s last chance to survive.According to Andrew Baines, curator at the National Museum of the Royal Navy and project director of HMS Victory, the vessel is slowly rotting because she is not adequately supported.A £550,000 survey conducted aboard the ship showed its true state and revealed necessary repairs.  MailOnline writes that the vessel’s keel has been dropping by half a centimetre a year due to water damage and the current dry dock cradle was putting stress on Victory’s hull.The museum is already working on enhancing the vessel’s cradle with some 140 points of support. Other works that are planned to be conducted will have a goal of stabilizing the vessel and replacing old planking making her top deck watertight, as reported by Portsmouth News. Baines estimates the project would cost about £35m-£40m.HMS Victory, originally made of oak, started its previous 50 year-long makeover project in 1955. She was first launched in 1765 and served as Admiral Lord Nelson’s flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.In March 2012 the National Museum of the Royal Navy took responsibility of the vessel which will celebrate her 250th anniversary in May this year.[mappress mapid=”14860″]Naval Today Staff, Image: hms-victory.com View post tag: National Museum View post tag: europe View post tag: conservation View post tag: HMS Victorycenter_img January 7, 2015 View post tag: News by topic HMS Victory in Need of a Makeover View post tag: Makeover View post tag: UK Navy Share this article View post tag: Restorationlast_img read more

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Ocean City Offers Wintertime Fun

first_imgBy MADDY VITALEOcean City may be the first place to think of along the coast for a family-style summer vacation to enjoy the beaches, entertainment, Boardwalk, bay and eateries.But what about in the offseason? Ever thought about giving “America’s Greatest Family Resort” a try in winter?“While many see Ocean City as a summer retreat, the island is also a wonderful and peaceful place to enjoy during any season,” explained Michele Gillian, executive director of the Ocean City Regional Chamber of Commerce. “Ocean City, New Jersey, is America’s Greatest Family Resort and offers year-round fun for the whole family.”Santa Claus makes his appearance at the Ocean City Christmas Parade to the delight of thousands of spectators.Throughout Christmas there was an array of holiday events, attractions and even a parade with Santa as the star of the hour. Holiday decorations throughout town, horse-drawn carriage rides and entertainment continue until New Year’s Day.Gillian explained how magical it is in Ocean City over Christmas.“Christmas is always so exciting, from the beautiful decorations, free horse and carriage rides, photos with Santa in an official lifeguard boat, breakfasts with Santa, and all the holiday events,” she said.And to start off 2020 right, Ocean City hosts the biggest family-friendly, alcohol-free New Year’s Eve celebration around with “First Night.”It offers 70 activities, acts and events from 4 p.m. to midnight to ring in the New Year and not break the bank.For just $20 per person, “First Night” revelers have an all-inclusive ticket to a multitude of entertainment venues. The celebration is capped off by fireworks at midnight.Fireworks create a brilliant display to ring in the New Year. (Photo courtesy City of Ocean City)“First Night Ocean City is the perfect family way to spend New Year’s Eve. First Night offers many different entertainment options so there is something for everyone, all in a safe, family atmosphere,” Gillian said.And after the New Year’s Eve festivities, there is still a lot to do, she emphasized.To really make the first day of a new year memorable, all one has to do is go to Ocean City for “First Day at the Beach.”New Year’s Day includes the traditional “First Dip,” a wacky plunge into the chilly ocean next to the Music Pier at Moorlyn Terrace. It is scheduled at 2 p.m.The weather forecast calls for temperatures in the 40s on New Year’s Day, not bad for those brave enough to race to the water’s edge and take the plunge.The Boardwalk is popular among strollers and bicyclists year-round.For those who prefer to stay on dry land, there is the 5k Boardwalk Run 1 p.m. on New Year’s Day. And for others who like to exercise their shopping legs, there is the “First Day Shopping Extravaganza,” which offers customers bargains in the downtown along Asbury Avenue from Sixth Street to 14th Street.After the first couple of days into the New Year, Ocean City may slow down in its events listings, but Gillian noted that there are still many activities and attractions to enjoy throughout the quiet season.And there is always an abundance of shopping choices, whether in the downtown or on the Boardwalk, along with restaurants open year-round, she said.“Stores stay open throughout the year, along with great restaurants and recreational opportunities. Any time of the year is beautiful to walk or bike ride along our award-winning Boardwalk,” Gillian said. “The winter is a great time to book your summer vacation or search for your dream home on the island.”For more information about Ocean City and its offerings visit: https://oceancityvacation.com.From left, sisters Barbara Broomall, Bonnie Tomaszewski and Debbie Flagg shop downtown along Asbury Avenue in the fall. The traditional First Dip plunge in the ocean is a wacky way to celebrate New Year’s Day.last_img read more

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Dr. John, Galactic, And More Of New Orleans’ Finest To Honor Allen Toussaint At Hollywood Bowl Salute

first_imgLos Angeles’s Hollywood Bowl is hosting a “Yes We Can: An Allen Toussaint Salute” on July 20. The NOLA musician will be honored by New Orleans’ finest: Dr. John & the Night Trippers, contemporary funk powerhouse Galactic, and of course The Allen Toussaint Band, with special guests.Dr. John, Nevilles, Jon Batiste & More Pay Tribute To Allen Toussaint At Jazz FestThe performances will be joined by the iconic voices of Irma Thomas, known as the “Soul Queen of New Orleans,” and legendary percussionist Cyril Neville as special guests throughout the evening. The night is sure to be special, as New Orleans’ finest come together to celebrate the life of an extraordinary musician. Tickets currently available here.Watch Allen Toussaint perform a beautiful “Southern Nights” in 2011:[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

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An art exhibit replete with diversity

first_imgThe guests in the Sert Gallery huddled over a wooden shipping crate, champagne flutes perched on the edge, piecing together a jigsaw puzzle of an Amazonian panorama. Across the room, visitors laughed as they frantically picked miniature paper stars off the ground, and wondered aloud if they might take them as souvenirs.The guests crowded into the Carpenter Center on April 27 for the opening of “Attached,” this year’s exhibition of theses by graduating seniors in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies (VES). Their works, which are characterized by their diversity of materials and methods, will be on display through May 24.The impulse to touch is nearly overwhelming in Daniel Yavuzkurt’s installation, which recasts one corner of the gallery as a 19th-century naturalist’s cabin. The walls of the gallery are stained a warm brown, the bottom like tree trunks and the top like vines,  reminding Yavuzkurt of his summer in the jungle of Peru, “where the sky is a real black with stars, not the awful orange night of the city.” The artist angled a desk lamp at a drawing of a turtle, showing ripples across the paper. The machete he cleared brush with is probably off-limits, as is the whiskey, but the rest of the exhibit invites visitors to feel.Scott Roben is the sole representative of oil on canvas, but his “reverse rubbing” technique is hardly traditional. He covered his enormous canvases in paint, laid them against textured surfaces, then began the labor-intensive process of scraping away excess paint to reveal dimpled turquoise asphalt or lavender corrugated metal.Roben and good friend Rebecca Levitan shared studio space over the past year, and now their theses share a central wall in the exhibition. Levitan’s work provides a foil to Roben’s, allowing the texture of the canvas to show through overlapping layers of silkscreens that came from a vacation snapshot.“The effort that went into these works was tremendous,” said Levitan, speaking about everyone’s work in the show. “The Carpenter Center is a very flattering place to show them.”On the opposite wall, Chappell Sargent’s black-and-white oils of mannequins do exactly what the artist claims in her statement: capture the experience of late-night window shopping. The eerie smoothness of the Masonite adds to the voyeur’s discomfort — look, but don’t touch.Nearby, Sara Stern’s work is an exercise in identity construction. She presents herself as Facebook’s first artist-in-residence, displaying a fabricated correspondence with founder Mark Zuckerberg complete with Facebook messages, a telephone conversation, and videos for Zuckerberg. There is Stern on video, talking to Mark or to the viewer, pausing to chew or smirk.A line of shoes outside Ingrid Pierre’s installation betrays a group of visitors escaping the bustle of the opening to find solace in her version of a Buddhist tearoom. Pierre’s take on identity is perhaps less mischievous than Stern’s, but her approach is no less eclectic. She recreated 16th-century robes with U.S. Army uniform fabric and kitschy patterns of sushi and cartoonish cowboys. An iPad with a calligraphy app (created by Pierre) sits beside a more traditional desk and brush.Upstairs, Juliet Macchi seeks to wow viewers and to find peace through joyfully mindless repetition. The artist’s investment and effort is clear from the scale and number of components: a few thousand hand-folded paper stars no bigger than fingernails, an arch about 7 feet tall covered in push-pins, and a massive doodle with an uncountable number of pen strokes. Macchi calculates that she has spent two hours working on her art for every visitor to the exhibition — or upwards of 1,500 hours.Although others haven’t counted their hours, it is clear everything in the exhibition is a labor of love. See “Attached” and feel the investment: “It’s been four days since I stopped doodling, and I still have a numb thumb.”last_img read more

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North Carolina stops issuing Confederate license plates

first_imgRALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles says it will no longer issue specialty license plates featuring the Confederate battle flag. The StarNews of Wilmington reports the agency says removal of the license plate, issued to members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans organization, took effect Jan. 1. A statement from NCDMV says it will continue to recognize the North Carolina Division of Sons of Confederate Veterans as a civic organization entitled to a specialty plate, but the recognition doesn’t entitle it to dictate the contents of the government speech on that plate.last_img read more

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Groups Call On New York To Eliminate Fossil Fuel Subsidies

first_imgStock ImageALBANY – New York organizations are calling upon the state government to eliminate non-essential fossil fuel subsidies from the budget for the upcoming fiscal year.In a press conference organized by the New York Youth Climate Leaders, Natural Resources Defense Council, and New York Public Interest Research Group, over 150 student, faith, labor, political, business and environmental groups from across the state issued a letter and petition addressed to legislative leadership and Governor Cuomo to eliminate unnecessary fossil fuel subsidies from the 2021-2022 state budget.The groups say that New York is also facing a projected budget shortfall of more than $14 billion in the current fiscal year.In light of this, the letter from advocates states that “Everyday New Yorkers, who are already suffering so greatly, cannot afford to bear the brunt of our fiscal shortfall. Instead of cutting essential public services, New York must make polluters pay by cutting subsidies to the oil and gas industry.” Marco Volpitta, Co-Director of Government Affairs for the New York Youth Climate Leaders, said “As we move into an economy without fossil fuels, it’s high time that New York State stop giving tax breaks to companies with no place in the future of energy.At a time when New York faces a multibillion-dollar budget shortfall, investing in our communities and safeguarding the future of our state should be prioritized over subsidizing an industry that no longer helps our state thrive.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Pecan Field Day

first_imgUniversity of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host the Southeast Georgia Pecan Field Day in Baxley, Georgia, on Wednesday, Aug. 28.UGA’s Southeast Georgia Pecan Field Day will cover the different aspects of pecan production and help local pecan growers identify problems and come up with solutions. The event is free and open to the public.”This field day is a chance for growers in this area to get together, to learn from the specialists and to learn about some of the research we’re doing, as well as socializing and getting the chance to see what other growers are doing,” said Shane Curry, UGA Extension agent for Appling County.The field day will begin at 8 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 28, starting with equipment viewing and registration. Companies including Savage, Flint Ag and Turf, Chemical Containers and more will display equipment used for pecan production and harvesting, and industry representatives who manufacture and sell these products will be on hand to talk with participants. The welcome and introduction to the program will start at 9 a.m., to be followed by the orchard tour. The field day will end with a free lunch for all participants.UGA Tifton campus agricultural engineer Glen Rains will demonstrate proper sprayer setup for tree coverage, an important topic for controlling scab disease, Curry said.“Our whole spray program is centered around controlling pecan scab, but if you’re not getting the correct coverage, it doesn’t matter what product you use — it won’t work very well,” he added.Experts will also cover topics including young tree care, irrigation, soil moisture sensors, herbicides and insect control methods.Last year’s field day attracted more than 300 people from 31 counties and three states. Curry hopes that research, education and programs like this one can help local growers stay productive and in business for the long term by helping them make good economic decisions for their farms.Parker Brothers Farm is hosting the event at 334 Veal Camp Road in Baxley, 5 miles northeast of Ten Mile Road. There will be signs directing participants to the farm.For more information, call the Appling County Extension office at 912-367-8130. Participants are asked to call and register for the free event by Aug. 23.last_img read more

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How to ‘Crack the Cloud’ for credit unions

first_imgWe’ve all be inundated by the term “the cloud” for years now, but does anyone (besides your IT person) really know what the cloud is? We asked that same question to CUProdigy’s CTO Xerex Bueno (also Top 10 coolest names to appear on CUbroadcast) and he said you’ll probably get 10 different answers from 10 different people.Being a Chief Technology Officer, Xerex had the answer for us and much more in this tech chat on where credit unions should be headed this year and beyond. We discussed such items as why credit unions should consider the cloud, how it benefits them and ultimately their members, security concerns, data migration, and advice for CUs venturing down this virtual road. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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eClosing and buying a home: Technology’s role in closing on a mortgage

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Technology is transforming everything; it is changing the way we communicate, the way we access goods and services, and even the way we purchase homes. Soon, more and more consumers may increasingly find themselves being offered technology that allows them to access, sign, and submit mortgage closing documents online. We believe that “eClosing” can leverage technology in the mortgage closing process by providing consumers with more time to review closing disclosures and transform the way consumers relate to the overwhelming process of closing on a home.When we asked consumers what they felt were the biggest issues associated with closing on a home loan, the most common statements we heard were:There is a lot paperwork to review at closingI’m having trouble knowing who can answer my questionThe whole process is painful and overwhelmingThe main goal of our research into the use of eClosing has been to better understand how technology could help reduce the prevalence of these issues. continue reading »last_img read more

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