USU Football Dismisses QB Jason Shelley Sunday

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah-Sunday, Utah State interim head football coach Frank Maile announced junior quarterback Jason Shelley, a transfer from the University of Utah, has been dismissed from the team for a violation of team rules.Maile confirmed, in a Sunday statement, that he would not comment further on the matter.Shelley is a 5-11 190-pound quarterback from Frisco, Texas and Lone Star High School who started the Aggies’ first four games of the season.In those contests, Shelley completed 51.5 percent of his passes (51-99) for 420 yards, two touchdowns and two interceptions.Shelley transferred to Utah State last summer after spending the past three seasons at the University of Utah.He redshirted for the Utes in 2017 and started five games in 2018 and 2019, for Utah. Tags: Jason Shelley/USU Football Brad James November 15, 2020 /Sports News – Local USU Football Dismisses QB Jason Shelley Sundaylast_img read more

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A vision for Edinburgh’s New Town

first_imgNew images have been published of New Town North – one of the largest regeneration projects Edinburgh for a generation, illustrating the latest design phase of the development.The ambitious New Town North development is set to transform the 5.9-acre former Royal Bank of Scotland site in Edinburgh’s New Town and is being delivered by property company Ediston on behalf of Orion Capital Managers, whose fund bought the site in May 2019.The developer launched the online interactive consultation which can be viewed here: www.newtownnorth.co.uk.Proposals include a mixed-use development replacing existing buildings with new homes, build-to-rent apartments, premium office space and a high-class hotel. Also planned are retail outlets, gym and health facilities together with extensive landscaping and new public realm.Ross McNulty, Development Director at Ediston, reaffirmed the developer’s commitment to delivering a high-quality scheme. “Now, more than ever, we are 100% committed to progressing with our planning application this year,” he says. “New Town North will provide a significant boost for the local area which will have a positive impact on local businesses – who are in desperate need of some good news right now.”Ediston Orion Capital Managers premium office space Ross McNulty New Town North development new homes Build to Rent apartments May 21, 2020Jenny van BredaWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Land & New Homes » A vision for Edinburgh’s New Town previous nextLand & New HomesA vision for Edinburgh’s New TownThe Negotiator21st May 20200161 Viewslast_img read more

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Bad Boys 2

first_imgBad Boys Two Odeon Friday 10-Thursday 16 October What you have to remember about this sequel is that is was inevitably going to be made , since the first film earned (to employ the language of Will Smith’s character, the irrepressible Mike Lowrey) “a huge fucking pile of dough” for Jerry Bruckheimer, the producer, and all others involved. So after this long wait of eight years, what are we left with? A dazzling cinematic display, with some skilful camera direction by director Michael Bay, including a jaw-dropping car chase to rival anything from The Matrix Reloaded, as well as an original continuous circling sequence of Smith and Lawrence in a shootout with some Jamaican yardies, plus a pretty sketchy plot involving a crazed cuban drug lord, the Miami PD, the DEA, FBI, CIA (anybody beginning to notice a Bruckheimer theme?) and about $150 million dollars of Dutch Ecstasy. The two leads bicker incessantly, and while at times the wisecracks are witty, the constant “getchur black ass outta my face nigger” becomes tiresome. An improbable chase out to the Caribbean, total destruction of Miami city centre, and the littering of the streets with morgue corpses is a tad too much even for the Bad Boys and after two and a half hours the ugly morality and misogyny of this film becomes tedious.ARCHIVE: 0th Week MT2003last_img read more

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The genius of Dr Allinson

first_imgA time long before our corrupted kids took to the streets armed with blades and economy lager (back in Victorian times they preferred catapults and pennyworths of gin), our esteemed doctor had these words of advice for child-rearers. However, BB will not be held responsible for the consequences of freezing your kids…On kids: “The longer children are out in the open air, the better for them. Let them be out in all weathers; wind will give colour to their cheeks, the sun will tan them, and the rain will not harm them. Frost makes them run about to keep warm, and the cold weather invigorates them.”Next week: ’Scotchmen’last_img read more

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National parks’ economic benefits put at over $100B annually

first_img“The concept of setting aside and protecting land as a public good has been widely embraced from China to Brazil to South Africa. … But protecting them is just the first step,” Bilmes said. “They also need a sustainable source of funding.”The national parks have proven increasingly popular in recent decades, with annual visitors increasing from about 200 million in 1980 to more than 300 million in 2015.The agency, which marked its centennial in 2016, oversees more than 400 individual parks, monuments, battlefields, sea shores, recreation areas, and other facilities. Among them are the world’s first national park, Yellowstone, whose establishment in 1872 began a preservation movement that has spread around the world.Over the past two decades, operating funding has remained relatively flat, rising from $2.2 billion in 1999 to $2.5 billion in 2018. Over the last 10 years, however, the park service acquired 26 additional sites and saw its workforce fall by 7 percent. Though the parks themselves are valued for their natural beauty, they also contain a significant amount of infrastructure — visitor’s centers and other buildings, roads, bridges — whose maintenance has not kept up, as well as landscape maintenance such as fire prevention activities and watershed management.“Every year they get further and further behind,” Bilmes said.What’s needed, Bilmes said, is a rethinking of how the parks are financed. She and her co-authors outlined financing models such as endowments, bonds, and two-year federal appropriations.More targeted steps can also help. Reforming how user fees are managed, for example, could allow the park service to retain interest earned from surplus fees, which now goes to the federal government. That money could be used, for example, to service bonds issued to reduce the maintenance backlog. Another potential change would increase the park service director’s flexibility to move surplus funds to meet needs in other parks. That flexibility is limited to 20 percent of each unit’s appropriation. Bilmes and her colleagues suggest increasing that to 50 percent.Other steps involve how concessions pay for the right to operate in the parks. They currently are levied a fee that averages 5 percent, though that is offset by cost-sharing arrangements that in some cases — like that of the operator of government-owned hotels along the Grand Canyon rim — result in the park service paying more each month than it receives in concession fees.“The national parks are the most beloved government entity in the country. They have enormous approval ratings, 330 million visits a year,” Bilmes said. “People come from all over the world to see the national parks, but the parks are on an unsustainable funding trajectory.” Kennedy School’s Bilmes shares findings from forward-looking commission Amazon blazes could speed climate change National parks at a turning point Harvard researchers recount working and living at one of the most remote places on Earth: The South Pole Related A new economic analysis of the U.S. National Park system puts its value to Americans at more than $100 billion, a figure that dwarfs the financially strapped agency’s $2.5 billion budget and underpins a call to change how what has been called “America’s Best Idea” is financed.The report comes as the National Park Service — which oversees such historic sites as Yosemite Valley, the Grand Canyon, Gettysburg’s battlefields, the Statue of Liberty, and the White House — deals with a maintenance backlog estimated at $12 billion and an annual budget that has remained roughly flat for 20 years, when adjusted for inflation, according to Linda J. Bilmes, the Daniel Patrick Moynihan Senior Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.The detailed analysis, published as a book, “Valuing U.S. National Parks and Programs: America’s Best Investment,” was released this summer. In it, Bilmes, co-editor John B. Loomis of Colorado State University, and additional authors used new methodologies to examine the various ways the national parks generate value for — and are valued by — Americans.The authors introduce a first-ever framework for estimating the value of the system, which could be used by other organizations to determine the worth of similarly hard-to-value resources. As part of that, Americans themselves, in a nationwide, peer-reviewed “willingness-to-pay” survey, said they’d accept additional yearly taxes totaling $62 billion to preserve the parks’ lands, waters, and historic sites, with half of that owing to their desire that the parks be available to future generations. Respondents also said they’d pay $30 billion to save the park service’s educational programs in schools and its role in preserving natural, cultural, and historic sites.The estimate also cites $36 billion in economic activity — and 300,000 jobs — generated through tourism and the ripple effects of travel dollars spent at hotels, restaurants, and other nearby privately owned facilities. Bilmes and Loomis also focused attention on less-obvious ways that value is generated, such as carbon sequestered in park holdings to fight climate change, with a $1 billion value, and intellectual property developed through movies and television shows filmed at the properties. Linda Bilmes has found that U.S. national parks “deliver at least 30 times the value of what the federal government contributes each year.” Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer.The analysis showed that value clearly exists, since film and television contribute $100 billion to the national economy and movies and television shows filmed at least in part in national parks yielded an estimated $29 billion in profits. The difficulty, however, is determining what portion of that return should go to the parks. Currently, film crews pay a low standard permit fee for access that has contributed at least in some way to the success of everything from “Star Wars” (the planet Tatooine is Death Valley National Park) to “Brokeback Mountain” (filmed in Grand Teton National Park) to “Jurassic Park,” “The Godfather Part II,” “Rocky IV,” “Star Trek IV,” “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” “The Shining,” and TV shows such as “M*A*S*H,” “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman,” and “The Biggest Loser.”The important point, Bilmes said, is that the parks “deliver at least 30 times the value of what the federal government contributes each year,” Bilmes said.Ironically, Bilmes first came upon the Parks’ budgetary woes while looking for examples of bad financing systems as part of an academic study. The park service qualified, she said, with annual revenue from five federal sources — each with restrictions on how the money is used — low budgetary priority, volatile annual appropriations, and additional pools of money from fees, concessions, and private philanthropy, again with restrictions on their use. In addition, each park or other unit is given its own line item in the budget, with limits on how many dollars can be shifted to better balance revenue and need, Bilmes said.That funding structure is poorly suited to an organization with a long-term mission like the park service, charged with protecting the parks and maintaining them into perpetuity, Bilmes said. Instead the agency needs funding that is stable, flexible, multiyear, and allows for operational and capital spending. “The national parks are the most beloved government entity in the country. They have enormous approval ratings, 330 million visits a year. People come from all over the world to see the national parks, but the parks are on an unsustainable funding trajectory.” — Linda J. Bilmes Life on the ice Thousands of intentionally set fires push Brazil’s rainforest close to the tipping pointlast_img read more

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Jamestown Man Pleads Guilty To Reduced Charge In Shooting

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MAYVILLE – A Jamestown man previously charged with three counts of second-degree attempted murder and a count of first-degree assault plead guilty to a reduced charged of second-degree attempted assault Tuesday morning in Chautauqua County Court, according to Chautauqua County Public Defender Ned Barone. Barone told WNYNewsNow that Rasul N. Bonds was released and sentenced to time served on the level E Felony. Jury selection was scheduled to begin Tuesday in front of Judge David Foley.At the time of Bonds’ arrest, Jamestown Police said one man was shot in the face and was seriously injured as he was walking with two other people.A second Jamestown man, Corey M. Johnson, plead guilty to a reduced charge of first-degree attempted assault on Oct. 23 in connection with the shooting. Johnson was sentenced on Jan. 6 to a determinate term of five years in state prison, plus five years of post-release supervision. Three 12-year orders of protection were also executed. last_img read more

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Brazil Invests in Border Surveillance Radars

first_imgBy Nelza Oliveira/Diálogo January 03, 2019 The Brazilian government allocated $37 million to acquire three low-altitude mobile air radars. The Brazilian Air Force (FAB, in Portuguese) will use the equipment to cover Brazil’s borders with Paraguay and Bolivia. The country shares 1,365 kilometers of border with Paraguay and 3,423 km with Bolivia. “The partnership will strengthen the fight against arms and drugs entering the country by monitoring small aircraft along the border,” said Public Security Minister Raul Jungmann at a meeting in Cascavel, Paraná state, on September 29, 2018. “Drug dealers use small airplanes and fly over the border at low altitude to escape conventional radars, managing to move a significant amount of arms and drugs that feed trafficking in Brazil.” FAB’s Social Communication Center told Diálogo that the Brazilian Airspace Control System has 21 of these radars distributed across Brazil. The system seeks to provide order, security, and efficiency for traffic flow at airports and in Brazilian airspace. Low-altitude air radars The radars in the border areas with Bolivia and Paraguay only monitor aircraft at high altitude. The lack of low-altitude mobile air radars allows airplanes to evade conventional radars and enter the national territory undetected, while performing low-altitude flights at up to 200 meters, close to trees or hills. “These radars can also detect low-altitude flights, which is essential in this region because the drug trade uses small planes as principal means of transportation,” Jungmann said. “This means we are closing our aerial borders to drug trafficking. We are closing sea routes to the main ports in Brazil, in Rio de Janeiro and Santos, as well as the bays along the coastline; and now we will also close the border with the two countries with whom we face severe challenges regarding cross-border crimes,” he said. When the radars detect a suspicious airplane, FAB’s fighter jets intercept it. The service members contact the pilot through an emergency international frequency, seeking information such as origin and destination. If the pilot fails to respond, FAB’s fighter jet may force them to land or alter route. The Federal Police (PF, in Portuguese) wait on the ground to search for weapons and drugs and take the suspects into custody. SISFRON During the transfer of fund ceremony, General Nivaldo Luiz Rossato, FAB commander, explained that the three new radars will be combined with the Integrated Border Monitoring System (SISFRON, in Portuguese), a program whose objective is to use high-end technology to monitor Brazil’s 17,000 km of borders with 10 neighboring countries. The pilot project that initiated in 2013 currently covers a range of 650 km in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul that borders Paraguay and Bolivia. The coverage only amounts to 4 percent of the country’s total border being completely monitored by fixed and mobile radars, optical sensors, and service members using night-vision goggles and long-range cameras, among others. SISFRON includes materials and sensing networks, command and control centers, and is integrated with PF and state police systems to guarantee flow of information. The system was initially scheduled to start operating along the entire Brazilian border in 2022. The date, however, was pushed to 2035, contingent on budget approval. Gen. Rossato said that when the three radars begin to operate they will “close the border’s blind areas,” that is, the regions that are currently difficult to monitor. “The use of these radars will help us defend our territory. It’s important to defend the airspace. As entry on the ground is so difficult, it’s much easier [for criminals] to bring drugs into the country via air,” said Gen. Rossato, adding that the radars could be operational in 2019. The next step consists of starting the bidding process to acquire the radars. During the ceremony, Jungmann said he anticipated that similar agreements would be executed with the Brazilian Army and Navy.last_img read more

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Zagreb Airport presented a new visual identity and slogan

first_imgCover photo: Josip Škof / MZLA The new visual identity contains elements / symbols of the city of Zagreb and recognizable views and geometric structures of the roof network of the interior and exterior of the passenger terminal. “As the network structure within the terminal has a triangle in its base, the new logo through the network shows the IATA code of the airport (ZAG)” explain from MZLA. New slogan “Choose your path” Guided by global communication trends, according to which airports promote the destination through a visual identity, Zagreb International Airport (MZLZ) will start using the new logo on April 1, 2019, reports MZL. A new slogan of the airport (“Choose your route”) was chosen, which is associated with numerous possibilities, destinations and freedom of choice. Depending on the medium or destination, the slogan can be adjusted to more precisely define the choice, ie the path to the destination or feeling, they conclude from MZLA. Source: MZLZ – Illustration: HrTurizam.hr Remark: This week the airports announced a summer flight schedule. More attached.last_img read more

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AlpInvest ranked world’s second-largest private equity investor

first_imgThis year, the study looked beyond fund investments for the first time, PEI said, adding that this reflected an increasing trend for institutions to invest outside the traditional primary fund structure.Dan Gunner, director of research and analytics at PEI, said: “In the main, fund managers should be pleased to see such strong commitments and allocations to private equity.“They’ll be less excited to see ever more interest from LPs in direct and co-investment opportunities.”He added that this was a trend that showed little sign of slowing.CPPIB came out as the biggest private equity investor in the latest survey, committing $26.2bn to private equity funds in the five years to the end of February, followed by AlpInvest, which had committed $19.5bn.AlpInvest was owned by APG and PGGM until 2011, when ownership was transferred to the Carlyle Group, but the two Dutch institutional investors remain big investors via the PE manager.Looking at the larger group of the top 50 private equity investors, North American institutions still dominated, PEI said, with about 60% of total commitments coming from US institutions.In the top 50, pension funds were the group investing the most, committing $144bn, followed by funds-of-funds, which were responsible for $93.9bn, or 30% of capital pooled by limited partnerships. AlpInvest Partners, the private equity firm used by Dutch pension groups APG and PGGM, is the world’s second largest private equity investor and the sole European in a top 10 headed by the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB), according to a new survey.The remaining 10 investors are all North American and include pension funds the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), the Teachers Retirement System of Texas and the Oregon Public Employees’ Retirement System, the LP50 survey of private equity investors by information provider PEI showed.The research covered limited partnerships, institutions that traditionally pool their capital with private equity fund managers.Overall, the top 50 such institutions have allocated $313bn (€230bn) to the asset class in the last five years.last_img read more

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Story Bridge Climb couple ready for next property adventure

first_imgOne of the bedroomsTHE owners of the Story Bridge Climb have listed their Kalinga Queenslander for sale as they prepare to downsize.John and Megan Sharpe are well known identities in the Brisbane tourism industry, founding the Story Bridge Climb in addition to owning or co-owning outdoor activities company Riverlife, Tangalooma tour business Tangatours, P & O Edge, Walkabout Creek Adventures and Northshore Harbour restaurant.Megan and John SharpeMr Sharpe said he and his wife purchased their property at 78 Lodge Rd, Kalinga in the 1995, back when the suburb still part of Wooloowin.The Sharpes raised their two children in the home and are now selling to buy a smaller Queenslander.The Kalinga property, marketed by Steve Yates of Place New Farm, will go to auction.“We raised, extended and renovated the home based on the idea of (a family with) three or four children,” Mr Sharpe said.“We only ended up have two children and now one has gone to study in London so we really need something that suits this time of our life.”While the couple have completed extensive renovations, including building in the downstairs area and adding a pool to the side of the home, the property still retains many of its character features including a bay window, timber floors and VJ walls.“This house was built at turn of the 19th century and has really lovely things like old the gas line for the gas lights that were put in after the house was built, and the breezeways that were designed to celebrate the federation,” Mr Sharpe said.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoSitting on an 810sq m double block, the house has an open-plan living and dining space upstairs, along with a kitchen that flows out to the huge back deck.There are four bedrooms on this level along with two bathrooms.Downstairs there is a fifth bedroom, third bathroom, lounge, multipurpose space, studio and soundproof gym and workshop. A custom floating internal staircase links the two levels.Outside, the rear patio overlooks the lap pool. The home also has an attic storage space.“There’s a couple of things I really love about the house,” Mr Sharpe said.“I love that it’s a house we rarely have to heat or (cool). And I love the beautiful, big old tree out the back that has a trunk the size of small car.“It’s a tree we’ve climbed and built cubby houses underneath.”Mr Sharpe said he would be sad to say goodbye to the home after nearly 25 years but he was ready to move on.“I think the children will miss it more,” he said.“They have spent their whole lives, their childhoods living here.”The property is being auctioned on April 13 at 4pm.last_img read more

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