Timing and climate forcing of volcanic eruptions for the past 2,500 years

first_imgVolcanic eruptions contribute to climate variability, but quantifying these contributions has been limited by inconsistencies in the timing of atmospheric volcanic aerosol loading determined from ice cores and subsequent cooling from climate proxies such as tree rings. Here we resolve these inconsistencies and show that large eruptions in the tropics and high latitudes were primary drivers of interannual-to-decadal temperature variability in the Northern Hemisphere during the past 2,500 years. Our results are based on new records of atmospheric aerosol loading developed from high-resolution, multi-parameter measurements from an array of Greenland and Antarctic ice cores as well as distinctive age markers to constrain chronologies. Overall, cooling was proportional to the magnitude of volcanic forcing and persisted for up to ten years after some of the largest eruptive episodes. Our revised timescale more firmly implicates volcanic eruptions as catalysts in the major sixth-century pandemics, famines, and socioeconomic disruptions in Eurasia and Mesoamerica while allowing multi-millennium quantification of climate response to volcanic forcing.last_img read more

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USU Soccer Adds To 2018 Soccer Roster

first_imgJune 1, 2018 /Sports News – Local USU Soccer Adds To 2018 Soccer Roster Tags: Emma Card/Heather Cairns/Imelda Williams/Kendyl Neus/USU Soccer FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah-Friday, with the Utah State women’s soccer program ready to commence its season in 2.5 months, head coach Heather Cairns announced additions to her roster.The new Aggies are Emma Card of Mapleton, Utah and Kendyl Neus of Gilbert, Ariz.Card comes to Logan as a four-year letter-winner at Maple Mountain High School and played a crucial role in the Golden Eagles winning the 2017 Class 5-A state championship. She was the star of a defense that surrendered only 26 goals and netted three shutouts en route to a 12-2-3 record and was also an all-academic honoree last season.Card has played club soccer for Utah FC for four seasons under head coach Eric Brady.News comes to Utah State after one season at Division II Fort Lewis of Durango, Colo., playing in 15 matches for the Skyhawks and posting nine starts.Starring at Higley High School, Neus led the Knights with 13 goals and 15 assists her senior season.Beyond this, the Aggies will welcome back returned LDS Church missionary Imelda Williams to the roster.The Timpanogos High School product played her freshman season at Logan in 2016 before departing for 18 months of service in Aguascalientes, Mexico.Williams will arrive back jut in time for the team to report for preseason training.Presently, the Aggies’ signing roster consists of 11 players with these additions. Written by Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Magdalen College in ‘eviction’ scandal

first_imgA Magdalen student has proposed a JCR motion condemning part of the college’s accommodation procedure as “illegal”.Mike Worth, a third-year physicist, stated in his motion: “The College routinely threatens students with eviction from college accommodation.” He went on to claim, “The College has a history of at least one attempted illegal eviction, which was only prevented by legal threats by the [Oxford] Council’s Tenancy Relations Officer.”Speaking to Cherwell, Worth claimed that this refers to an instance when Magdalen tried to evict him while he was working in Oxford over the summer. He alleged, “I received an email one Wednesday morning at around 11am informing me that I was being evicted on Friday at 4pm, and that any of my belongings not removed from the room would be ‘disposed of’.”He said, “After spending the next two days receiving support from the [Magdalen] JCR, OUSU, the Citizens Advice Bureau, Shelter, and Oxford City Council, the college finally relented after the Tenancy Relations Officer of the Council sent the Home Bursar a letter.”In the motion, Worth pointed out that lawful evictions must be supported by a court order, must have given at least 28 days’ notice, and must not contain any threats to dispose of any belongings left in the property. He claimed that in the incident referred to, Magdalen acted illegally on all of these accounts. At the time OUSU contacted Jackie Mogridge, Oxford City Council’s Tenancy Relations Officer, on Worth’s behalf.In a letter to Magdalen’s Home Bursar, Mr Mark Blandford-Baker, Mogridge stated, “Mr Worth has the legal right to remain in his room until the Oxford County Court orders him to vacate the premises […] The court will not make such an order until after the expiry of a valid notice to quit. According to the Protection from Eviction Act 1977, the notice period for a licensee should be 28 days.”Following these events, Worth stayed in his college accommodation until the end of his licence period, as it was less than 28 days. Worth told Cherwell that after complaining directly to the President of Magdalen about his case, who he claims “refused to apologise” for the incident, he asked about evictions under the Freedom of Information Act. The college however has not replied within the 20-day time limit to which organisations are normally obliged to adhere.Worth further alleged that Blandford-Baker “outright refused [to provide information], stating that he had ‘already wasted enough time on this’.” Worth added, “He refused to apologise for any of the college’s actions and made passing reference to lessons learnt without any details or apparent effect.”last_img read more

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Ocean City Council Candidate Profile: Mike Allegretto

first_imgREPORTER’S PROFILE:At age 42, Allegretto has experience as both president of the Ocean City Board of Education and as president of City Council.The lifelong resident is proud that the current council and city administration have delivered responsible budgets with none of the mass layoffs that other municipalities have experienced. And he points to the start of an aggressive capital plan to fix roads, bulkheads, beaches and the boardwalk.“Things are getting done,” Allegretto says.If were elected for a third term, Allegretto says he’d like to see continued capital spending on projects such as pumping stations to alleviate street flooding.He supports projects such as the rebuilding of a skateboard park in Ocean City and the installation of a turf field at Carey Field — not only as amenities for current residents but as a draw to visitors and as something that might attract new families to Ocean City.Allegretto sees his job in the real estate industry as an asset.“Realtors are the largest promoters of the town,” he says. “I’m on the phone all the time with people who live in the town. I get constant feedback.”With contracts for public employees expiring after 2014, Allegretto thinks the administration can do “even better” in negotiating terms on salaries and benefits to save taxpayers’ money. DEFINING OCEAN CITY MEMORY:Allegretto’s defining Ocean City memory actually occurred at The College of New Jersey, then known as Trenton State College. It was there that the young man realized that Ewing Township was not Ocean City — and he says he began to realize how truly special his hometown is. Ocean City Council candidate Mike AllegrettoFive candidates are running for three open seats on Ocean City Council in the May 13 municipal election.The winners will serve four-year terms in at-large positions. City Council includes seven members — four elected from the city’s individual wards and three elected at-large by the entire Ocean City electorate.Candidates are (in reverse alphabetical order): Eric Sauder, Pete Madden, Mike Hyson, incumbent Keith Hartzell and incumbent Michael Allegretto.The following includes biographical and platform information provided by the candidate and a brief profile — along with a favorite Ocean City memory (just for the fun of it). Candidate profiles will appear each day this week. PLATFORM:Budget Savings: To annually construct and approve a reasonable and fair budget for the taxpayers.Capital Investments: To ensure current and future capital projects such as the Merion Park drainage and streets project, the north-end pump station, the south-end beach replenishment project, and boardwalk replacement project are finished at the lowest expense to the taxpayer.Recreation Opportunities: To continue working on recreation projects such as the new turf field at Sixth Street, the skateboard park and the updated 15th Street playground to benefit our families and youth, and to attract new families to Ocean City.Tourism Marketing: To work on with the Tourism Development Commission to develop an annual marketing campaign to attract new and repeat visitors. To assist the three SID district in band to develop budgets to promote each district to consumers.Zoning Changes: To continue working on improving zoning throughout town which is consistent with current neighborhoods.Town Character: To ensure Ocean City remains America’s Greatest Family Resort. BIO:Age: 42Education: Ocean City High School, 1989; The College of New Jersey, 1993, Bachelor of Science in business administrationNo. of years lived in Ocean City: Lifelong residentFamily: Wife, Lisa; children Gavin and AlexisOccupation: Office manager at Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, 5501 West Ave.Public service: Two terms on City Council (Council President 2010-13); Ocean City Board of Education member 1999-2006 (Board President 2004-05), Tourist Development Commission member, Business and Neighborhood Development (BAND) memberlast_img read more

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DeHaan: Gas prices to bump up through July 4

first_img Google+ By Network Indiana – May 24, 2020 0 287 Google+ DeHaan: Gas prices to bump up through July 4 Twitter Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp (“Gas Pump” by Mike Mozart, CC BY 2.0) STATEWIDE–Every couple of weeks, there will continue to be a “noticeable bump” in gas prices, says GasBuddy. With states continuing to loosen coronavirus restrictions, demand for gasoline has increased.“Watching demand recover has been certainly a surprise. More Americans are hitting the road. Demand bottomed out in early April when we were almost all staying home. It was just half of what it normally is. Now we’re about three-quarters of where we normally are. That’s why prices have rebounded,” says Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy.That’s a trend you can expect to continue, DeHaan says.“I think every couple of weeks, we’ll see a bump somewhere around 15-20 cents. We could be talking about prices somewhere in the $2.29 to $2.39 range by July 4 and perhaps around $2.49 to $2.69 by Labor Day, so long as things continue to recover,” says DeHaan.But he says prices in Indianapolis are still $1 per gallon lower now than they were May 2019.You can also expect there to be more precautions at gas stations because of the coronavirus.“Gas stations have done a lot. They’ve responded well to keep their stations cleaner. They’ll have hand sanitizer at the pump or in the store,” says DeHaan.He also recommends carrying your own sanitizer, if possible.“Get the sanitizer out if you’re touching a gas pump. Remember, you’re touching something that somebody else has touched, whether it be the pump or the buttons, etc. Just be aware of the surfaces you’re touching,” says DeHaan.DeHaan expects summer gas prices to be lower compared to previous years, even with demand increasing. WhatsApp Twitter CoronavirusIndianaLocalMichiganNews Facebook Pinterest Previous articleF.O.P. approves proposed 2.5% increase for South Bend PoliceNext articleThree children in Indianapolis struck by vehicle, killed Network Indianalast_img read more

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Bob Weir Opens Campfire Tour In Dallas [Videos]

first_imgBob Weir kicked off April tour dates with the Campfire Band (Aaron Dessner, Bryan Devendorf & Scott Devendorf of The National; Josh Kaufman; Steve Kimock; and Jon Shaw) in Dallas, where he performed for the first time since 1991.The tour continued in support of Bobby’s latest LP Blue Mountain, a solo album inspired by the Grateful Dead guitarist’s experiences on a ranch in Wyoming. Weir opened the evening with three songs performed solo on stage with an acoustic guitar: Bob Dylan’s “When I Paint My Masterpiece” and Little Feat’s “Easy to Slip” followed by “Blue Mountain.” The Campfire Band joined Weir on stage to perform songs from the new album, wrapping up the first set with “Gonesville.”The fluidity of the first set continued throughout the evening. At the conclusion of set break, that familiar Grateful Dead aroma filled the air and the band returned to the stage with a Texas-themed twang and a theme of Grateful Dead songs. Beginning with “El Paso” and “Deep Elem Blues” (which is about the Dallas neighborhood of Deep Ellum, located a few minutes from where Weir performed), the set list included “Friend of the Devil,” “Althea,” Weir’s “Cassidy,” “Truckin” and “Standing on the Moon.” They closed out the second set with “Goin’ Down the Road Feelin’ Bad.” All seven members performed the encore songs, the melancholic “Ki-Yi Bossie” from Blue Mountain, and the Grateful Dead’s “Ripple.”Weir continues the spring tour with two nights in Austin at the Moody Theater on Saturday and Sunday and two nights at New Orleans’ Sanger Theatre. Weir will perform at Wanee Music Festival and with Sammy Hagar in May before hitting the road with Dead & Company this summer.Watch these fan-shot videos from last night’s tour opener below.Only A River, shot by Ratdog TourGallop On The Run, shot by Ratdog TourGonesville, shot by Ratdog TourFriend of the Devil, shot by Ratdog TourStanding On The Moon, shot by Ratdog TourGoin Down The Road Feelin’ Bad, shot by Bill MageeKi-Yi Bossie > Ripple, shot by Ratdog TourBob Weir & The Campfire Band will continue in Austin for two shows at ACL Live at The Moody Theater this weekend. Edit this setlist | More Bob Weir setlists[photo courtesy of Bob Weir’s Facebook page] Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Digging yields clues

first_imgNature vs. nurture has long been one of the great debates in science — is behavior hard-wired into the brain, or determined by environment?In at least some cases, Harvard researchers are showing, how animals behave is in their genes.As described in a Jan. 16 paper in Nature, a team of researchers led by Hopi Hoekstra, professor of organismic and evolutionary biology and molecular and cellular biology, studied two species of mice – oldfield mice and deer mice – and identified four regions in their genome that appear to influence the way they dig burrows.“Given that burrowing is such a complex behavior, it was surprising that it may be controlled by just a few genes,” Hoekstra said. “More importantly, it looks like the genetics are modular, so if we think in terms of how do you ‘build’ a complex trait, it could be that as you start to put these different modules together, they add up to this complex behavior.”According to Jesse Weber, the paper’s lead author and a former graduate student in the Hoekstra Laboratory: “People have long been fascinated about how and why animals build homes. I believe this is one of, if not the first attempt to determine which genes are associated with the evolution of animal architecture.“Although we have not yet identified the exact genes that are involved, this study sets the foundation for research that will do precisely that,” he added. “As soon as the mutations or genes are found, I think it opens the very exciting opportunity to explore whether the same genes/mutations affect mammalian instincts in general.”Though closely related, the species build drastically different burrows. While the deer mouse digs relatively shallow and simple burrows, oldfield mice burrows are complex, complete with a long entrance tunnel, a separate nest chamber, and an escape tunnel that nearly reaches the surface.In the field, Weber excavated the intricate burrows of oldfield mice across their range in the southeastern United States, and found that whether in hard-packed clay or sandy dunes, the length of the burrows was remarkably constant. This suggested that their burrowing behavior might be more strongly influenced by genes than environment.To examine the role of genetics in producing differences in burrows, Weber and his colleagues began by crossbreeding the mice. When placed in a burrowing box in the lab, the new, hybrid mice dug deep, complex burrows similar to those of the oldfield mice.“That was a bit of a surprise, because we might guess that a hybrid would build an intermediate burrow, because it got some genes from one parent and some from the other,” Hoekstra said. “What this suggests is that the genes involved act in a dominant fashion.”When researchers crossbred the hybrid mice with deer mice, the results were striking, Hoekstra said. While some in the group continued to build complex burrows, others built burrows that combined traits from both species.“When we genotype those second-generation hybrids, and measure their burrowing, we’re able to see if there are any genetic regions that the small-burrowers have in common that aren’t present in mice that build larger, more complex burrows,” Hoekstra said. “Those regions are then thought to harbor genes that control the difference in behavior.”What researchers discovered, she said, were four regions of the genome that appear to play a role in burrow design – each of the first three added about three centimeters to the length of the burrow’s entrance tunnel, while the fourth made mice approximately 30 percent more likely to dig an escape tunnel.The next step is to begin identifying which specific genes are tied to burrowing behavior, and then to investigate how changes in those genes work in the brain to cause mice to build different burrows.“One interesting aspect of this is that we are hypothesizing that pathways that are involved in addiction might be involved,” she said. “These mice look like they’re addicted to burrowing. It’s too early to say anything definitely, but that’s one area we are exploring.”Hoekstra emphasized that she isn’t suggesting that all behaviors have genetic origins.“It’s clear that both genetics and environment contribute to most behaviors. There are some that are entirely dependent on environment, and there may be some that are all genetic, but most are somewhere in between,” she said. “What we’ve shown in this case is that for this behavior, in these two species of mice, there is a large role for genes.”last_img read more

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Poet and Radcliffe Fellow Sarah Howe wins TS Eliot Prize with “amazing” debut collection

first_img Read Full Story Poet and Radcliffe Fellow Sarah Howe, whom judges say “brings new possibilities to British poetry,” was awarded the TS Eliot poetry prize. As the Frieda L. Miller Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Howe won the prize for her collection “Loop of Jade,” which examines her British and Chinese heritage.It is the first time in the history of the award that a debut collection has won the prize.The Poetry Book Society Judge and Chair Pascale Petit said: “In a year with an incredibly ambitious and diverse shortlist, it was difficult to choose the winner. However Sarah Howe’s “Loop of Jade” shone with its startling exploration of gender and injustice through place and identity, its erudition, and powerful imagery as well as her daring experiment with form. She brings new possibilities to British poetry.”last_img read more

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Removing guns from distraught individuals may help curb suicide rate

first_img Read Full Story Friends of distressed individuals can have a role in helping to reduce the nation’s rising suicide rate by showing compassion, optimism, and coaxing the distraught person to hand over guns, pills, and poison that they might use to kill themselves, said Catherine Barber, director of the Means Matter Campaign at the Harvard Injury Control Research Center at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in a April 21, 2016 Los Angeles Times article.Barber was commenting on a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which showed a 24% increase in suicides in the U.S. between 1999 and 2014, including alarming increases among white women and Native Americans. About 42,773 Americans died of suicide in 2014, making it the 10th leading cause of death for all ages. Many who attempt suicide act impulsively—and if they have access to a gun, they are much more likely to succeed. Firearms claimed about half of the male suicide victims and about one-third of female suicides in 2014.“Often, the moment for a friend to intervene is related to a crisis that is going to resolve, like a divorce,” said Barber.last_img read more

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Earth Institute director compares university curricula

first_imgAs part of her visit to Notre Dame, senior director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University Sara Sievers gave another lecture on Thursday night in conjunction with the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. The lecture, titled “What Contributions Can Universities Make to the Practice of International Development?” focused largely on her experience designing university curriculum.Sievers specifically spoke about Notre Dame’s planned Keough School of Global Affairs, which will contribute to advancement in the developing world. The Keough School — the first new school at the University in 97 years — is set to open in 2017.“It’s really a pleasure and quite literally an inspiration to be here,” Sievers said. “I think it’s tremendously exciting. It’s not every day of the week that a university starts a new school.Sievers served as founding executive director of Harvard University’s Center for International Development, and has worked extensively in the developing world as a Foreign Service officer during her tenure at the Gates Foundation. For the last 10 years, she has worked at Columbia University’s Earth Institute.Initially, Sievers’ talk focused on curriculum used at both Harvard and Columbia.“We’ve tried to build a tripartite model of learning, integrating academic degree programs and teaching, research programs and field work,” she said.Part of the Earth Institute’s work focuses on what Sievers described as “peer-to-peer partnerships.” Through Global Classroom projects at Columbia, students all over the world, particularly in Africa and Latin America, have been able to take classes taught at the Columbia through lectures posted online and online discussion sections. Harvard participates in the edX program, which offers a similar experience.Sievers said this was significant because, of the top-10 universities in Africa, none of them made the top 300 globally — mostly because education funding in the developing world was pushed toward primary and secondary education instead of tertiary education.Sievers said the goal of international development is to empower people in developing countries with the tools and skills to manage on their own.“We’ve done the knowledge transfer to work ourselves out of a job, which is a pleasure,” Sievers said of one particular project in which she was contracted to the Nigerian government to do technical backstopping.“International development is inherently interdisciplinary. An interdisciplinary method is the only way to approach a problem like this,” she said. “At the Earth Institute, we have ten degrees that we have adapted with other departments … earth and science, earth and journalism, and several others.“Technical skills have been very helpful for our students, in fact we’ve probably focused too much on the quantitative. When you’re actually out practicing development, there need to be tools and skills that you have that are more qualitative.”“Right now, there is more demand for space in these programs than we are able to supply. The country and the world need more programs like this,” Sievers said. “And there are jobs for these students, and our students are getting jobs.”Sievers said that in many universities she has worked with, “we have to cajole the university president into doing this weird thing as opposed to what we should be doing, which is research. My understanding is that would not be the case [at Notre Dame].“The Catholic Church is basically unparalleled in terms of service to the poor. I was astounded by how many people on the ground in these countries were Catholics, not necessarily peers but nuns and priests and missionaries. It’s my opinion that because of that, you will be able to be more effective more quickly.”Tags: International Development, Kellogg Institute, Keough School of Global Affairslast_img read more

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