iGB Live! Online: Day one round-up

first_img15th July 2020 | By Daniel O’Boyle Topics: Marketing & affiliates iGB Live! Online: Day one round-up Tags: Online Gambling The first day of iGB Live! Online saw attendees listen to a host of digital marketing experts discuss best practice and SEO innovation. Email Addresscenter_img The first day of iGB Live! Online saw attendees listen to a host of digital marketing experts discuss best practice and SEO innovation.The day began with keynote speaker and digital marketing superstar Neil Patel discuss how to win the ‘Google wars’, sharing six hacks with delegates to improve their search engine optimisation (SEO) efforts.This session saw Patel highlight a number of ways to leverage content more effectively, such as by constantly tweaking pieces over a month to ensure it remains evergreen. He also picked out lesser-known elements such as YouTube SEO, as part of a broader drive to take effort omni-channel. A full recap of that session is available here.“The humble click” Next came Izzi Smith, a technical SEO analyst from Munich-based marketing software specialist Ryte.Smith’s session was focused around helping SEO specialists make most of their time. She explained that while marketers were working harder than ever to deliver the best possible results in uncertain times, this could mean they lose sight of the most valuable key performance indicators.“What it all boils down to, that’s the humble click,” she said.Smith recommended Google Search Console as the way to access the data needed to analyse performance, though this would have to be supported by dashboards to analyse and scale the data gathered.“It doesn’t matter which tool you are using as long as you are using Google Search Console to analyse your performance,” Smith explained. “Only on Console can you see what really happens; it’s your data – it’s free and reliable.”However she warned marketers to use this wisely, and not get lost in misleading clickthrough rates, or average ranking positions. If time is precious, it has to be used wisely, Smith said.Therefore she picked out four patterns to monitor, starting with performance-based Google Core updates. This would allow marketers to analyse underperformance, and whether clicks declined over time or in one fell swoop as a result of an update.Second, Smith continued, it was crucial to identify and exclude irrelevant rankings to ensure marketers get meaningful clicks from each keyword. Additional steps could be taken through the third tip, SERP enrichment potential mining, such as using direct answers to queries for use in featured snippets.Finally Smith recommended identifying Google’s top ten tests, to identify and take action for underperforming keywords, and ultimately prove a site’s worth to Google, to remain high in the rankings.“Not all lost links are really lost” SEO consultant Julia Logan (pictured) followed, highlighting the importance of quality links. She explained that regular link audits would allow marketers to keep on top of any links that could be lost, and recommended using multiple data sources, as each employs different methodologies to identify and report links.“Not all lost links are really lost,” she added.Logan explained that blocking technology could make solutions such as AHRefs or Majestic believe a link had been lost, or that changes in the source or target URL, or to anchor text, could cause it to log the updated link as new, and class the previous as lost.She also pointed out that moving links – where an article posted moved off a site homepage or further down a page as new content was published – are often marked as lost when they have just moved.But if a link truly is lost, Logan advised listeners to make sure it actually needed to be recovered. If a page was no longer live, it could be a case of changing to the new URL, which would mean no value would be lost. Links from scraper sites, she added, did not need to be recovered.“[They] don’t add any value to your site, and tend to get lost. Scraper sites get thrown out of the index quite a lot and get lost. No one is going to renew those sites.”Those that are lost through being removed could be something to contact a site owner about, and dealt with on a case-by-case basis.“You could take Google with a pinch of salt” Finally, in a session titled ‘The definition of quality-driven SEO in igaming’, Martin Calvert, marketing director at ICS digital discussed how affiliates and operators can build and protect their search rankings by ensuring they deliver a quality experience for users.Calvert said that while Google has warned of negative consequences for “dirty tricks” such as keyword stuffing or low-quality link-building for some time, now those who wish to maintain a high ranking must take these warnings much more seriously.“Ten years ago Google was talking about doing the right thing. They said, ‘Don’t do anything naughty’ but we all knew we could do some naughty things,” Calvert said. “You could take Google with a pinch of salt. “Now though, I think we have to actually listen more completely to Google on these things.”Calvert said that now, building expertise, authority and trust are more important than ever.“That’s something that can be reflected in your content,” Calvert said. “It’s about the depth you go into, how you back up your statements, how you can show you’re actually writing for human beings. And that doesn’t just apply to academic writing: It applies to casino reviews, it applies to match previews, it applies to betting tips.”Calvert added that the quality of site experience was also a major factor in how Google determines if a site is quality.“When you’re on a gaming website there are multiple steps you go through to learn about a game or look at odds,” he explained. “If the experience is slow, if it’s painful, if it can’t be done on a wonky 3G connection, it’s going to push customers away, but now it’s also going to hurt your SEO.”However, this focus did not mean links were obsolete, he was quick to add.“Links are fundamental to how Google discovers sites in the first place and fundamental to how it determines quality,” Calvert said. “Google cannot pick up upon what’s a purchased link and a non-purchased link, it just recognises whether a link is quality. “The first day of iGB Live! Online content is available to watch on demand, and users can also sign up for today’s (16 July) sessions here. Remember, the physical event is coming up, taking place at the RAI in Amsterdam, from 22 to 25 September. Click here for more details. Marketing & affiliates Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

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Scotland name squad to face Japan

first_img“This selection is a first chance for some to put their hand up.  We have a 22-months campaign pre-World Cup and one of the mantras is ‘this could be your last Test match.’” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Re-instated: Nick De Luca returns to Scotland’s centre thanks to good defensive form and an injury to Alex DunbarDESPITE A last minute scramble with soon-to-be-director of rugby Scott Johnson jetting down to London to listen to a briefing from refereeing chief Joel Jutge and the IRB the Scotland team to face Japan has been announced.With injuries to full-back Stuart Hogg and Alex Dunbar it is a fresh looking centre pairing while one possibly shocking drop comes from Richie Gray missing out in the second-row. It is understandable as Castres use more of a rotation system and Tim Swinson in particular is in good form.However, as it is a game against Japan rather than South Africa, who visit Murrayfield next week, Johnson can afford to run an eye over some of the less experienced players or those who have not worn a thistle for a few weeks before taking away the chances and trying to beat Rugby Championship opposition.On his side Johnson said: “We are looking to the future and we’re also looking at people’s futures too.center_img Scotland XV v Japan: Sean Maitland; Tommy Seymour, Nick De Luca, Matt Scott, Sean Lamont; Ruaridh Jackson, Greig Laidlaw; Ryan Grant, Ross Ford, Euan Murray, Tim Swinson, Al Kellock, Kelly Brown (c), Al Strokosch, David Denton.Subs: Pat MacArthur, Al Dickinson, Geoff Cross, Richie Gray, John Barclay, Henry Pyrgos, Duncan Weir, Duncan Taylorlast_img read more

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Cancer Research UK trials online-only entry for sponsored runs

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  51 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Digital Events Research / statistics “By having only Web entry, it cuts down our costs considerably and makes the Cancer Research UK 10 accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”This trial underlines the strong affinity between events-based fundraising and the Internet. Many charities have enjoyed success for some years with recruiting runners online, and companies such as Justgiving.com and bmycharity.com have built up businesses largely around online events sponsorship.The events are open to both men and women over the age of 15, and it is expected that more than 10,000 people will take part thisyear, raising £1 million for Cancer Research UK.The events are sponsored by Halifax Card Services, Reebok, Malvern, Classic FM, realrunner.com and British Runner Magazine.center_img Cancer Research UK trials online-only entry for sponsored runs Entry to this year’s Cancer Research UK 10 series of sponsored runs will only be available via the Web this year, the first time the charity has tested this approach.The 2004 series of ten 10-kilometre runs will take place during September and October in the grounds of stately homes including Althorp, Sandringham, and Blenheim Palace.Roseann Wilson, head of e-business at Cancer Research UK, said: “We decided to trial online entry only this year because people attracted to doing the Cancer Research UK 10 runs seem to be keen Web users. We found that the majority of people who entered the series last year did so online and we decided to take it one step further. Advertisement Howard Lake | 4 June 2004 | Newslast_img read more

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Security guards burst into journalists’ meeting and attack them with iron bars

first_img July 6, 2020 Find out more News Follow the news on Argentina News November 9, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Security guards burst into journalists’ meeting and attack them with iron bars Reporters Without Borders today condemned a violent attack by about 10 private security company guards who burst into a union meeting of dozens of journalists employed by the Diario Crónica newspaper in Buenos Aires on 7 November and hit them with iron bars and batons, injuring nine of them.“The journalists seem to have served as an outlet for the aggressiveness of the security guards although they were just peacefully defending their rights,” the press freedom organisation said, calling for an investigation and the punishment of those responsible.Two of the victims, Ricardo Fioravanti and Pablo Pereyra, were rushed to a hospital intensive care unit.The security guards also threatened the journalists, shouting, “Do you remember the disappeared?” and “You will all end up dead,” alluding to the thousands who disappeared during the 1976-83 military dictatorship.The Union of Buenos Aires Press Workers (UTPBA), which had representatives at the meeting, accused the security guards of behaving like the death squads that operated during the dictatorship.The violence ended when a police officer arrived in response to a call by the journalists.Diario Crónica’s staff has been at loggerheads with the newspaper’s management for nearly two weeks as a result of the announced dismissal of at least 71 of its journalists and the elimination of its evening edition.The meeting had been called so that the representatives of the UTPBA and an internal commission could report back to employees about the outcome of a meeting they had earlier that day with the labour ministry. Help by sharing this information Organisation RSF_en Receive email alerts Newscenter_img ArgentinaAmericas ArgentinaAmericas Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia to go further November 19, 2020 Find out more News Latin American media: under control of families, economic and political elites December 4, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

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Master Gardeners to hold plant sale at TroyFest

first_imgLatest Stories Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Skip By The Penny Hoarder Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Master Gardeners to hold plant sale at TroyFest By Jaine Treadwell “Right now, I don’t know exactly what our members will bring,” Calk said. “Every year, we have a different selection.”Calk said it’s not easy to tell what potential shoppers will want.“One year, we will have certain plants that sell like crazy,” she said. “The next year, we’ll have a large number of those popular plants and very few will be sold.” Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration The Pike County Master Gardeners will display their “roots” at TroyFest on Saturday at the Farmers Market section across from Byrd’s Drugs.The Master Gardeners will each have several of their favorite perennials and annuals and indoor and outdoor plants for sale on that one day and one day only.Leigh Calk, Master Gardeners communications chair, said it is up to each member of the Pike County Master Gardeners Association to decide which plants she will bring for the sale. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Sponsored Content You Might Like Late runs lift Patriots to 8-1 win on senior night The Pike Liberal Arts Patriots hosted Chambers Academy on Monday afternoon in Troy. The Patriots celebrated senior night with an… read more Calk said the Pike County Master Gardeners sale will feature the “favorite” plants among the individual club members and will be sold at very affordable prices. The Master Gardeners will be available to answer questions about the plants for sale, about re-potting or re-planting and year-around care. Email the author Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Published 10:14 pm Monday, April 19, 2021 Book Nook to reopen So, the Pike County Master Gardeners offer a wide variety of good, hearty plants, including hanging baskets, especially ivy, succulents and shrubs.“We will have some vegetables, including heirloom tomatoes, and a few house plants,” Calk said. “We also will have ferns that were grown by students at the Agriculture Academy at Goshen High School.” Print Articlelast_img read more

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Top 40

first_imgTop 40On 1 May 2001 in Personnel Today Power can be remarkably short-lived, as can be seen with our third list ofpower players, clocking up 23 new entries. The dominant themes which influenced the Personnel Today team’s choiceswere the rise of out-sourcing and eHR – with the major players and theirclients continuing to win serious business and make significant savings – andthe challenges of globalisation, which has helped many international HRmanagers make names for themselves.Profiles by: Caroline Horn, Jane Lewis and Sue Weekes1 Nick Starritt (3) Group HR director, BP Despitea little local difficulty over UK fuel protests last autumn, BP has had acracker of a year – announcing the highest set of profits ever made by a UKcompany (£10m). A close associate of CEO Sir John Browne, Starritt has been atthe centre of the action managing the aftermath of three”mega-mergers” within 24 months. This has meant assimilating 100,000employees across the world into the new BP. Meanwhile, he has also had hishands full shaping the company’s new-look HR function in the wake of the Exultdeal – as well as heading off teething problems. Nevertheless it has beendescribed as a meeting of two minds. Starritt remains ebullient about futureprospects, quoting CEO Browne’s dictum that “the best is yet to come”.2 James Madden (2) CEO and president of Exult Exult’scontinuing reign as the world’s leading outsourcer of Web-enabled HR processmanagement means Madden keeps his place at the top of the pile. This year,Exult built on its initial deal with BP to win a further slew of contractsworth an estimated $2bn – including a $1.1bn deal with the Bank of America anda $300m contract with Unisys – and now supports some 350,000 employeesworldwide. The company opened two new processing centres in Glasgow andCharlotte, North Carolina, and, with a staff count of 1,300, has itselfquadrupled in size over the past year. In June 2000, it conducted a successfulinitial public offer and “established and sustained” a marketcapitalisation of $1bn. 3 Vaughan Young (16)Chief operating officer, e-peopleserve Aschief operating officer at e-HR services provider e-peopleserve, Vaughan Youngis shaping the HR infrastructure of tomorrow and applying technology to totallytransform the function. His and e-peopleserve’s aim is to install e-HR systemswhich rid HR of the drudgery and burden of administration and let staff get onwith the real issues, such as the war for talent and securing the rightcompensation and benefits packages. That he can bring about major change iswrit large on his resume: while director of HR and development services at BT,he led the transformation of personnel services, introducing commercialprinciples and practices. “Yes, he is visionary,” says a colleague,”but he also has a practical aptitude for the day-to-day.” Young iscurrently building a global management team to lead e-peopleserve’sinternationalisation, making the company a worldwide force in the e-HR servicesmarket. 4 Will Hutton (38) Chief executive, The Industrial Society WillHutton has succeeded in rejuvenating the Industrial Society as a truecampaigning organisation, driving issues such as corporate responsibility,work-life balance and social equity to the fore and influencing public policyat the highest level. Just over a year into his tenure, the society is alsoenjoying financial security. But the former editor of the Observer, who isdescribed as an “inspirational leader” by colleagues, has plenty leftto do. The society welcomed the Green Paper on flexible working, but itcontinues to press the Government to take a stronger lead in tackling theculture changes employers must make when implementing flexible workingpractices and new parenting rights. The work carried out by its Futures division will help shape working practicesover the next decade. With such a successful first year in office, Hutton’sinfluence can only grow. 5 Geoff Armstrong (7)Director general, CIPD Armstrongheads up the CIPD, which represents the HR profession and has had a mixed year.No sooner had the organisation achieved its six-year goal of gaining charteredstatus than a debate emerged on how well it was meeting members’ needs overissues such as training and development. The CIPD is now in the midst ofchanging its professional standards so that they are more focused on businessmanagement – updated standards will be introduced in mid-2002. While thesebehind-the-scene changes continue, the CIPD will also be working to raise itsprofile as it aims to encourage more HR professionals to become full members. 6 Elizabeth France (-)Data Protection Commissioner France gains her place mainly as a consequence of the new Data ProtectionCode she has pioneered, which aims to offer guidance to employers on the use ofemployee personal data. Unfortunately, the code looks like raising morequestions than it answers. Slammed by the CBI as “unworkable”,opponents claim it will prove to be more than an unnecessary headache toemployers. Too focused on employee rights, they claim it will lead to”unreasonable obligations”. Particularly contentious are the extrarestrictions on employee monitoring and e-mail access. What is certain is thatif she sticks to her guns, France is bent on a collision course with much ofthe profession. 7 Rita Donaghy (-)OBE, Chairwoman, Acas A former ground-breaking trade unionist in the growing areas of educationand white-collar work, Donaghy’s tenure at Acas may well see the arbitrationbody regain the kind of public profile it has not enjoyed since the 1970s. Anatural chairwoman, she claims she was “born” for the job. Over thepast year, Acas has particularly boosted its role in the small business sectorwith numbers contacting the body rising by 40 per cent. Its long-awaitedvoluntary arbitration service, which should reduce the time and cost ofemployment litigation, still needs more cash to deal with increased demand. ButDonaghy’s status as a leading New Labour light – she was formerly on both theLow Pay and Equal Pay Commissions – gives her the clout to get it. 8 Michael Porter (-) Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School The fact that “sustainable competitive advantage” has achievedcliché status shows the continuing global influence of this management thinker.His Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance is nowin its 52nd edition and has been translated into 15 languages. Many claim ithas transformed their understanding of what is meant by competitive advantage.The strength of Porter’s work lies in his ability to dissect organisations andshow where the real value lies. This hands-on approach has found favour withAT&T, Procter & Gamble, Credit Suisse First Boston, and even a coupleof heads of state. Regular speaking appearances on the CIPD circuit this yearhave ensured a growing following within the HR community. 9 Gurbux Singh (37) Chairman, the Commission for Racial Equality Gurbux Singh has a deserved reputation for change and modernisation and hisfirst year at the Commission for Racial Equality has been no different. Butafter 12 months of overhauling internal systems and management styles andattending to the commission’s image, he is now turning his attention to widerissues. He is not afraid to court controversy either, as shown by the furoreover the compact on race in the run-up to the General Election. The new Race Relations Amendment Act came into force in April. “The publicsector now has a positive duty to fulfil certain criteria, including putting inplace critical measures to respond to race issues, and performancemeasurement,” says Singh. “That has huge implications for the humanresource industry.” The commission will produce its own codes of practiceand will be responsible for enforcing the legislation. 10 Anna Diamantopoulou (10)Commissioner Responsible for Employment and Social Affairs, EuropeanCommission A surprise appointment two years ago, Anna Diamantopoulou has been workinghard to raise her profile with a series of speeches that put human resources atthe heart of European growth and competitiveness. She says, “There is agrowing recognition that effective social and employment policies are vital forworkers and for business.” And she is looking for change, to “revamp and remodel our labourmarkets and to modernise what we call the European Social Model.” ECdirectives over part-time work and fixed-term work, as well the proposal on theEuropean Information and Consultation Directive for compulsory employeeconsultation, are all moves in that direction and could have a significantimpact on the UK labour market. 11 Bryan Sanderson  (-)Chairman, Learning and Skills Council Bryan Sanderson is the new head of an ambitious Labour initiative – theLearning and Skills Council – which aims to improve the skills of Britain’sworkforce. There are currently around 6 million adults in the UK without formalqualifications. The LSC was launched in March but already has a high profile and Sanderson willspend the next year building on that. “Improving staff training should notbe viewed as a cost, but as a real investment,” he says. “Ourresearch shows that even a small increase in training spending cansignificantly increase profitability for businesses both large and small.”In the coming months, Sanderson says, the LSC will be talking to”learners, learning providers and businesses in order to change currentattitudes and create new opportunities”. 12 Susan Anderson  (-)Director of human resources, CBI Susan Anderson has spent nearly a year as director of human resources at theCBI and has been extending her influence on both a national and European level.She has lobbied the Government to reduce the burden of legislation on smallbusinesses, and represented employers’ views during negotiations on theNational Minimum Wage and Part-Time Work Law. In Europe, she is involved innegotiations over European directives on part-time work and fixed-term work.She warns, “If the Government decides to introduce these, it will have asignificant impact on businesses as the UK currently has a more flexible labourmarket.” The continuing pressure for new legislation – particularly in an election year– will keep the CBI busy protecting the interests of employers. 13 David Ulrich (12)Associate professor of business administration, University of MichiganBusiness School Named by Business Week as the world’s top educator in human resources, DavidUlrich continues to be a massive draw on the conference circuit because of theclarity of his vision when it come to the future of HR. His comments that HRprofessionals will be removed, outsourced and automated if a new agenda is notdefined ring harsh but true, being delivered at a time when many need guidanceas to how they can add greater value to business. As an expert inorganisational change, his vision is based on the HR department becoming abusiness partner and a leader of change and innovation. But it’s not justinsight he offers, with attendees to events saying that they come away withpractical tools and techniques to put it all into practice. And they’re notalone in this, with half the Fortune 200 having used Ulrich as a consultant. 14 Michael Moore  (-)Director of HR operations Glaxo Smithkline The year saw Michael Moore finally get his teeth into his greatest careerchallenge to date – the long-awaited merger with GlaxoWellcome. He is nowresponsible for devising and implementing HR strategy for the world’s largestpharmaceutical company. Unsurprisingly, after two or three false starts, thenewly-combined company admits it faces a staff motivation problem, and Moore’sfirst priority is to tackle this. His likely model will be theSmithkline/Beecham merger undertaken a decade ago, which majored on the pursuitof a completely new culture. Consolidating the company’s global reach remains apreoccupation. But Moore’s policy of developing global awareness by regularlymoving the company’s 150 country managers around the world has paid dividends –as has his “risky” decision to promote young talent to seniorpositions ahead of the usual schedule. 15 Maggi Bell (20) Business development director, Capita Capita has spent the past year consolidating its position in the outsourcingmarket rather than engaging in debates on outsourcing, so its profile has beenslightly lower. Having said that, the organisation has grown tenfold, and it isfor this reason that Bell makes it into our top 20 again. It now managesbetween £120 to £150m outsourced HR services in the public and private sectors.Capita has recently secured its largest contract to date, for the Blackburnwith Darwen Council. The shift to outsourcing shows no signs of slowing in thepublic or private sectors. Capita will introduce an education portal inSeptember – a result of increased interest in performance in this sector –while mergers and acquisitions in the private sector, particularly amongutilities, will keep Capita busy here, too. Best Value remains the driver for newcontracts, says Bell, but adds, “Both parties have to work togethereffectively for outsourcing to work – it’s not something either party can enterinto loosely.” 16 Peter Drucker (25) Management thinker Now in his 93rd year, the most respected management thinker of the 20thcentury continues to make waves in the 21st. Although some have criticised hiswork as over-simplistic and/or too dense for easy consumption, he remains themaster of the one-off phrase, or Druckerism. Moreover, his early pronouncementson the advent of the knowledge economy – in which the importance of humancapital overtakes that of traditional capital and natural resources – have morethan come to fruition. If nothing else this should continue to bolster hisstanding as the patron saint of HR. Over the past year Drucker, ever thefuturist, has switched his attention online, developing online managementcourses in conjunction with Corpedia Training Technologies. 17 Helen Wilkinson (-)Founder and CEO, e-lancentric A pioneering member of the think-tank Demos, which had a major influence onthe Labour Government Wilkinson’s predictive workplace ideas and opinioncontinue to make her an intellectual force to be reckoned with. She has spentmuch of the past year setting up her online organisation, e-lancentric, createdto serve the needs of the country’s growing community of e-lancers. She alsoaims to use it to build a knowledge bank about the “elancentric”lifestyle to inform and educate business. In Personnel Today, she recentlywrote about the need for HR directors to prepare for an increasingly mobile andremote workforce. She sits on the Demos Advisory Council and with her work, TheDot Bombshell: Women, Technology and the New Economy, too, to be published bythe Industrial Society this summer (for which she is a research associate),expect her to be stirring up debate over the coming months. 18 John Monks (5) TUC General Secretary Another mixed year for John Monks, which sees him slip down the ranks. Hesuccessfully challenged the Government on parental leave – the case is nowbefore the European Court of Justice – although his bid for a £4.50 minimumwage failed. He has made it clear there will be further battles over workplace rights forstaff. The TUC wants to see a number of changes introduced, including fullemployment rights from day one, the extension of the Working Time regulationsto excluded sectors, and to ensure all staff are covered by the EmploymentRelations Act. Given that this is an election year, the recent raft of legislation aimed atsatisfying union demands is unlikely to abate – businesses are going to befaced with a lot more in the coming months. 19 David Guest (28) Professor of Organisational Psychology and HR Management, King’s CollegeDavid Guest’s move from Birkbeck (where he’d spent 10 years) to King’s marksa move to public sector work and he is currently enjoying being in the thick ofit evaluating Tony Blair’s nurse consultant initiative. He is also working onthe second stage of the CIPD’s Future of Work programme, which looks at therelationship between HR management and performance – findings are expected tobe released this autumn. Visitors to the CIPD conference at Harrogate this yearcan see the fruits of another of his projects, which looks at HRM andperformance from the chief executive’s point of view. With his psychologicalcontracts work also continuing, expect this quietly prodigious academic towield considerable influence over the next 12 months. 20 Vance Kearney  (-)Vice-president of human resources, Oracle Corporation Europe Vance Kearney’s own special interest in systems and technology and how theycan relate to people management has ensured that the HR function in Oracle hasplayed its part in the now famous billion-dollar bottom line saving, espousedin the press by CEO Larry Ellison when Oracle transformed itself into ane-business. Kearney joined Oracle in 1991 as director of human resources andnow, as vice-president of HR Europe, he is a global HR executive in every senseof the word, generally on a plane somewhere at least once a week. Colleagues say he’s put the relevance back into HR (he also makes it fun,they say) and with a straightforward and pragmatic approach has linked itdirectly with business operations. Oracle’s implementation of an e-HR system isalready fulfilling the dream of a strategic HR department. 21 John Hofmeister (-)Group HR director, Shell In the aftermath of another record year for Shell, Hofmeister cancongratulate himself on the group’s successful merging of global strategy andglobal organisation in 155 countries. Change management of all kinds has been a major preoccupation this year andHofmeister’s ability to root out and capture talent has had an important partto play. He claims a significant accomplishment has been the reorganisation ofthe slimmed down HR corporate centre, now consisting of eight people –”all global leaders in their own right”. He also made progressdeveloping Shell’s global HR shared services centre – rolling out a $250mSAP-based HR system – and successfully argued for a significant investment inleadership education. Most recently he has been working to ensure a seamless transition aschairman Sir Mark Moody-Stuart hands over the reins to Phil Watts in July. 22 Julie Mellor (35) Chairwoman, EOC The issue of equal pay has become much more high profile as a result of theEqual Opportunities Commission’s Valuing Women campaign. The Equal Pay TaskForce’s recommendations were hotly debated, and over the coming year the EOCwill begin implementing the Task Force’s proposals. Mellor says, “Thecontribution of HR specialists will be an essential part of that process. Ivery much hope that the Government’s women’s employment review will speed upprogress on equal pay and begin to tackle the causes of women’s concentrationin a small number of occupations.” The outcome of the Government’sconsultation on work and parents is also expected. “Whatever conclusionsare reached, the question of how to enable parents to balance work and family willbe a priority for all practitioners.” 23 Cary Cooper (26) Professor of organisational psychology and health, Manchester School ofManagement and deputy vice-chancellor, University of Manchester Institute ofScience and Technology (Umist) The publication of two further books on workplace stress and a major reportfor the EU’s European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and WorkConditions on Stress Prevention in the Workplace have ensured that the prolificProfessor Cooper remains the media’s favourite human resources academic pundit.With over 80 books now published and a list of credentials that reads like alitany, you’d think 60-year-old Cooper would start to take things easy. Nochance: he continues his Quality of Life survey work for the Institute ofManagement and is currently involved in a project for HEFCE to evaluate all ofBritain’s business schools. 24 John Welch (21) CEO, General Electric Described by the New York Times as “one of the most successful managersin the US”, the now world-famous Welch has a bigger fan club than manyHollywood superstars. He retains his place in the HR Top 40 by dint of hiscontinuing personal influence on how people are managed. Where GE leads, othersfollow. This year, ominously, Welch’s previous emphasis on employee-friendlypolicies has been replaced by a much tougher stance – no doubt indicative ofthe prevailing economic situation. He has emerged as a strong supporter offorced grading and now advocates identifying and removing the lowest performing10 per cent of GE workforce on an annual basis. This Darwinian approach tomanagement is the only way to “raise the bar of performance and increasethe quality of leadership”, he told shareholders recently. 25 Keith Handley  (-)Change director for the City of Bradford Metropolitan District Counciland president of Socpo Newly elected Handley owes his position at 25 for three principle reasons:he aims to combat the growing recruitment and retention difficulties byoffering staff more personal development; Socpo will lead the way in adoptingthe anti-discriminatory measures of the Race Relations (Amendment) Act; and hehas a key role in overseeing the expansion of the society’s membership to allpersonnel officers. Declaring that Socpo has established itself as an”important voice of the profession” on the national stage, he has setan ambitious target to raise membership from 500 to 5,000. As part of this healso wants to raise the number of black members, which stands at 5 per cent. Howwell he meets these targets will determine whether he appears in this list nextyear 26 Clive Newton  (-)Global head of HR, PricewaterhouseCoopers Last year, Newton gained plaudits for the fine balance he struck betweenglobal and local considerations following the £8bn merger between PriceWaterhouse and Coopers & Lybrand. This year many of these preoccupationsremain – complicated, perhaps, by PwC’s decision to spin off its consultancybusiness from its core accountancy activities. “In the old days, HR folkdid HR. Now we are having to get smart about multi-million-dollar IT systemsand become acute tax specialists,” he says. The priority this year is tofully establish the business as a global entity. With 36,000 employees in 57countries, “this is a big stretch” – particularly the conundrum ofhow you implement worldwide systems that are also legal and cost-effective on alocal basis. This also applies to sorting out the right reward structures forPwC’s 1,500 partners across the globe. 27 David Bell  (-)Director of people Pearson David Bell is testament to the wisdom of Pearson CEO Marjorie Scardino’sdecision to put a “creative” in charge of the group’s main asset –its content providers. A former FT journalist, Bell combines his role asdirector of people across the group (which includes Penguin Books as well asseveral TV production organisations) with his position as FT chairman. Heclaims his key challenge is to develop a culture that entices creative peopleto pursue their careers with the company – to make Pearson the best company towork for in its sector and encourage diversity. As part of this process, he haspioneered a share option scheme giving every employee a minimum of 15 shareseach. “Making people part-owners of the business has made a huge difference,”he says. 28 Stuart Crainer (-) Management writer and co-founder, Suntop Media Business books have never been more accessible than since Stuart Crainerstarted writing them and his work’s direct relevance to many of the issuesfacing the modern HR manager mean his influence is now felt far and wide in theprofession. But there’s more to Crainer than books – well, printed ones anyway.His company Suntop Media, founded with partner Des Dearlove, is providing someof the best and most incisive business content on the Web. In January itlaunched The Thinkers 50, which claims to be the world’s first ranking ofmanagement gurus (see www.thinkers50.com) and they are currently working on ajoint venture with Capstone called ExecExpress, which will feature a series ofe-books and various web-based business content. Crainer is also contributingeditor of Ftdynamo.com and writes for the American Management Association’s website, Mworld. His next book, Firestarters, co-written with Dearlove, willlaunch in July. 29 Susan Bowick  (-)Vice-president of HR, Hewlett-Packard HP has long enjoyed a reputation at the vanguard of HR practice – and thestrength of its corporate culture is such that HPers are said to be able to sniffone another out in the most crowded room. Much of the credit for this must goto Bowick, who reports directly to the CEO on fundamental strategies relatingto acquisition, divestments and employee expectations. Despite the strength ofthe overall culture, she believes in the importance of maintaining a strongdegree of localism. “We seed start-ups with domestic HP management toembed the HP way of doing things.” But the recent downturn in US IT spendhas hit it hard, forcing lay-offs, and this year she may have to refocus herconsiderable talent on further retrenchment. 30 Stephen Byers (1) Secretary of State for Trade & Industry Against our prediction last year, Stephen Byers has remained at his post inthe DTI, where he has spent the year furthering the Government’s decidedlyinterventionist approach to employer/ employee relations. Once again, a chiefcriticism levelled at Byers is his apparent reluctance to consult with those onthe frontline before taking action. Most recently he angered the profession byembarking on a review of the laws on employee consultation on redundancies –without consulting employer groups. Opponents claim that other Byersinitiatives this year, including the Work & Parents Green Paper and newmeasures on directors’ pay, are similarly roughshod in their approach. Althoughstill considered a rising star in New Labour, Byers slips down the Top 40. Thisyear, surely, Tony Blair will consider that the time is ripe for a move. 31 David Murphy (-)Vice-president of HR Ford Motor Company Responsible for more than 370,000 employees in over 200 locations, Murphyhas been with Ford Motors all his working life. Having spent the boom years ofthe 1990s tackling the manufacturer’s shift into more global procedures, he hasarguably got his work cut out this year dealing with the wider ramifications ofeconomic downturn. Supporters claim he is the right man for the job because ofhis ability to counter difficulties by pushing through ambitious and innovativeHR policies. His response to the company’s problems with racial issues a coupleof years back was to link compensation directly to diversity progress “inthe same way as you would link performance to quality”. 32 Ruth Spellman (14) Chief executive, Investors in people Ruth Spellman has continued to develop the profile of IIP in the UK andabroad – and now hopes to establish it as the minimum standard across Europe.By the autumn, around a third of the UK workforce will be working within anIIP-badged organisation, including nearly 10,000 SMEs. Internationally, theorganisation has licensed agreements with the Netherlands and Austria, andpilots are under way in France, Denmark and South Africa. As the organisationapproaches its 10th anniversary, Spellman aims to widen its brief by trainingIIP assessors to provide business advice, and by developing new modules for IIPclients based on best practice – starting with a recruitment module in June.”We want to help businesses to manage their people and get all theadvantages that come from that,” she says. But lack of evidence aboutcontribution to the bottom line sees her slip down the list. 33 Francesca Okosi (-)Head of HR, London Borough of Brent Francesca Okosi has already made it in to Personnel Today’s 21 to Watchfeature earlier this year and we make no excuses for her inclusion here.Described as one of the most able exponents of HR in the public sector, Socpo’svice-president will gravitate to president next year – the first black woman tohold the post. Previously head of HR at Merton and Havering, Okosi joined Brenttwo years ago. Her main remit is to equip staff with skills to cope with themassive change agenda inherent in public service modernisation. The aim forSocpo is to continue to raise the profile of HR in local, central and Europeangovernment. “We want our foot in the door,” she says. Her drive,strong debating skills, and ability to hold her own in any circle make this alikelihood. 34 Kathleen Barclay  (-)Global vice-president of HR, General Motors One of the largest and most globally diverse companies in the US, with357,000 employees on 223 sites across the globe, GM has become a byword inemployee education. Katy Barclay has continued to build on this tradition. Overthe past year she has pioneered an alliance with Unext’s Cardean University tooffer MBA courses to 88,000 employees, as well as boosting the motor giant’se-learning capability. eHR has been a major preoccupation this year: Barclayworked with Workscape to develop a global portal to give employees 24/7 accessto corporate information. She also introduced tools to assist GM’stransformation to a performance-driven organisation. Her talent was recentlyrewarded by her appointment as a fellow in the select US National Academy ofHR. 35 Linda Holbeche  (-)Director of research Roffey Park Holbeche’s research encourages HR practitioners to develop a strategicapproach to their work. This year she will add three more projects to herexisting portfolio with the publication of titles on mergers and acquisitions,change management, and on developing a high performance organisation. Theinstitute also continues to publish Management Agenda. But it is Holbeche’s support for a new strategic networking group forexperienced HR professionals that could grab the headlines over the next 12months. “This will be a group of people with opinions and practice, fromdifferent sectors, who will be able to share their experience about real issuesthat occur when trying to introduce change into an organisation,” sheexplains. “I hope it will be an influential group that can act as adipstick on opinions and policies.” 36 Federico Castellanos (-) Vice-president of human resources, IBM Federico Castellanos is living proof that a global vision for HR can cometrue, as long as you communicate your message consistently to HR communitiesaround the world. Just over four years ago, Castellanos stated that he wantedto change the image of the HR function at IBM because it wasn’t properlysupporting the business. The business had also become international while theHR function was country-based. Today, IBM has one of the best working models ofglobal eHR and the EMEA HR service centre in Portsmouth is widely regarded as aworldwide benchmark, serving 17 countries and 95,000 staff. It’s also managed toachieve a 57 per cent reduction in HR operating costs. 37 André Van Heemstra (-)Global head of HR, Unilever Appointed last year, Van Heemstra is typical of the new breed of global HRleader with a strong background in general management. Trained as a lawyer, heworked at Unilever first in marketing and then in general management. Prior totaking the group’s senior HR role, he was business group president for the EastAsia and Pacific Group. He claims his main remit at Unilever is”transformational” – the essence of people management is to keep pacewith external change. Thus, formulating new strategies to get the work-lifebalance right and to maintain staff loyalty have been as important this year asdriving through Unilever’s acquisition of Best Foods. 38 Hallstein Mork  (-)Senior vice-president HR, Nokia Very much a disciple of the Ulrich school of thought, Hallstein Mork has putin place a strategic HR department that is entirely in sync with the company’sbusiness aims. He believes HR professionals should be change-agents andbusiness partners and has created a culture of openness in the workforce thathas seen Nokia become one of the most desirable high-tech companies to workfor. Like its products, the culture is leading edge (the company’s HR intranetis called the Jazz Café) and it is increasingly moving towards self-service HRtools to further empower employees and managers. When on the acquisition trail,Nokia is as interested in the people employed at the targeted company as it isin their products and technology. Many of its acquisitions have taken placeoutside Finland, and there are over 2,400 expatriates on the Nokia payroll. 39 Paul Mckinley (-)Head of resource and development, Asda Paul McKinley heads up an HR team that has acquired a nationwide reputationfor staffing initiatives and its Stores of Learning concept earned it the Awardfor Excellence in Training and the overall winner’s place in the PersonnelToday Awards last year. It continues to innovate, and in the last 12 monthsMcKinley’s team has introduced Belief Days, which enable staff to take twounpaid leave days to celebrate a religious event not recognised on the calendarand First Day Half Days, allowing parents to take an unpaid half day to taketheir child to school on his or her first day. Additionally, there isgrandparents’ leave, which followed research that they are a parent’s firstchoice when it comes to looking after children. This enables them to take along spell of unpaid leave to care for grandchildren. 40 Heinz Fischer  (-)Vice-president of personnel, Deutsche Bank Fischer has been a central player in Deutsche Bank’s policy of growth byacquisition in the US and Europe – and is a member of the bank’s all-importantBereichvorstand. Last year, Deutsche Bank’s acquisition of the US giantBanker’s Trust saw it achieve the standing of the world’s biggest bank. Inrecent months, it has been a major player in the consolidation of the internalGerman financial services market. Fischer believes firms in the sector face aparticularly vicious fight for global talent, reinforcing the need to create astrong and distinctive corporate culture. “Apart from ability, the mostimportant criterion for a rapidly expanding company is shared values. This canbe a big issue in acquisition, particularly one set in another culturalcontext.” Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. 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Ikea stores play catch-up over flexible working

Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Swedishhome furniture chain Ikea is hoping to recruit and promote more female managersby introducing improved flexible working arrangements.Theretailer wants to encourage women already with the company to move up themanagement ladder and attract more external female candidates.AlisonPhillip, Ikea’s HR manager for the UK, fears the long opening hours at its 167stores is proving a turn-off for potential managers, especially women. Shewants to introduce more flexibility for managers as people increasingly becomeattracted to improved work-life balance or look to fit work around their familycommitments. Thegroup, which employs 7,000 staff across 167 stores, is considering allowingsome managers to work from home and looking at changing current workingpatterns.”Retailis quite male dominated, and I believe we’re a little out of balance. We havegreat balance up to a certain level then it stops,” she said. “We’rereally trying to encourage people to come through the organisation and lookingat our external advertising.” Althoughmore than 55 per cent of Ikea’s workforce is female, this diversity is notreflected at higher levels within the company, with just three women at storemanagement level compared to nine men.Phillipsis currently preparing draft documents on how the company will approach the problemand expects to unveil more details by January 2004.”Wehave to be smarter about how we can make this more attractive to women and men.It’s about being open to treating people with different life situations indifferent ways,” she added. Ikea stores play catch-up over flexible workingOn 8 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article read more

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Comparison of krill (Euphausia superba) density estimates using 38 and 120 kHz echosounders

first_imgA series of observations, using a dual-frequency calibrated echosounder operating at 38 and 120 kHz, of a patch of Euphausia superba close to South Georgia in 1986 is described. Sea state is shown to cause significant noise close to the surface, but to cause no significant signal attenuation. There is a consistent difference of ∼5 dB between the signal levels at the two frequencies which is in line with the difference noted from independent observations, theoretical models and in studies on encaged aggregations of krill.last_img read more

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Prep Sports Roundup: 12/5

first_img Tags: Acey Orton/Altamont/Alysen Talbot/Brandt Wiliams/Dom Burns/Fernando Elmer/Jaycee Rose/Kaetz King/Keldon Anderson/Makovey Jessen/North Sevier Wolves/Porter Wood/Ryker Hatch FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys BasketballNon-RegionALTAMONT, Utah-Fernando Elmer’s 17 points led the way as the North Sevier Wolves routed Altamont 65-47 Wednesday in non-region boys basketball action. Makovey Jessen had 20 points in the loss for the Longhorns.RICHFIELD, Utah-Dom Burns posted 10 points and the Judge Memorial Bulldogs overpowered Richfield 53-45 in non-region boys basketball action Wednesday. Keldon Anderson led the Wildcats in the loss with 12 points.PANGUITCH, Utah-Porter Wood netted 23 points and the Parowan Rams downed Panguitch 52-42 Wednesday in non-region boys basketball action. Acey Orton had 16 points and Ryker Hatch added 15 more in defeat for the Bobcats.DELTA, Utah-Kaetz King amassed 19 points and 6 rebounds and Brandt Williams added 18 points and 9 boards as the South Sevier Rams smacked Delta 61-48 Wednesday in non-region boys basketball action at the Palladium. Derek Smith had 11 points in the loss for the Rabbits.Girls BasketballNon-RegionJUNCTION, Utah-Alysen Talbot posted 10 points and the Piute Thunderbirds waxed Milford 51-45 in non-region girls basketball action Wednesday. Jaycee Rose led the Tigers in the loss with 13 points. Written by December 5, 2018 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 12/5 Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Italy: Commodore Ben Bekkering Assumes Command of NATO Flotilla

first_img View post tag: Ben Share this article Authorities View post tag: Flotilla On 23 January 2012, Commodore Ben Bekkering took over command of the Standing NATO Maritime Group One (SNMG1) from his Italian counterpart, Rear Admiral Gualtiero Mattesi. The ceremony took place at the Taranto Naval Base, Italy.The maritime group, also referred to as SNMG1, is an Immediate Reaction Force. It patrols regions where NATO wishes to protect its interests. In this way, SNMG1 contributes to the situational picture and also underscores the solidarity within the Alliance.At the same time, the naval squadron maintains a high level of readiness, so it can be deployed rapidly and effectively for tasks varying from humanitarian assistance to an evacuation or ensuring security in a maritime area. The flotilla also serves as a forward command capability for the NATO Response Force.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , February 01, 2012; Image: defensie View post tag: Commodore View post tag: Assumes View post tag: Command Back to overview,Home naval-today Italy: Commodore Ben Bekkering Assumes Command of NATO Flotilla View post tag: NATO View post tag: Navy View post tag: News by topic Italy: Commodore Ben Bekkering Assumes Command of NATO Flotilla View post tag: Naval February 1, 2012 View post tag: Bekkering View post tag: Italylast_img read more

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