Temporal scales of foraging in a marine predator

first_imgThe pattern of prey distribution can profoundly affect the foraging behavior and success of a predator. In pelagic marine ecosystems, where prey is often patchily distributed, predators must be able to adapt quickly to changes in the spatial patterning of prey. Antarctic fur seals feed primarily on krill, which is patchily distributed. When combined with information about swimming speed on the surface, the time taken for a fur seal to locate a new patch after leaving an old one is an indication of the distance between patches. The frequency distribution of intervals between bouts of foraging showed that fur seals foraged at two spatial distributions: (1) a fine—scale (median distance 0.18—0.27 km) represented by short (5 min) travel durations. In a study lasting 5 yr, the distributions of travel durations between bouts of feeding changed between years. These changes suggested that the structure and/or the spatial distribution of krill swarms varied between years. The behavior of fur seals suggested that there was overall clumping of prey at the fine—scale, but there was a more even spacing of prey patches at the meso—scale level. Only in 1 yr of the study (1990/1991) were there indications that fur seals had difficulty in finding enough food. Fur seal behavior suggested that there was no reduction in the number of prey patches available in that year but that prey patches were of poorer quality. The study showed how predator behavior can provide valuable information about the functional relationship between prey dispersion and predator performance.last_img read more

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Ramirez scores twice in 1st start since trade, LAFC beats RSL

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOS ANGELES (AP) — Christian Ramirez scored his first two goals since joining Los Angeles FC in a trade last week, helping the expansion team beat Real Salt Lake 2-0 on Wednesday night.LAFC acquired the high-scoring forward from Minnesota United on Aug. 6. The Garden Grove, California, left as the leading goal-scorer in United’s short history. He has nine goals this season.LAFC (11-7-6) ended a five-game winless stretch, including two straight losses. Salt Lake (10-10-5) has just one win in its last six games, with three draws.In the 13th minute, Ramirez controlled a cross from Carlos Vela with the outside of his foot and sent it past Nick Rimando. Ramirez had an easy left-footed redirection of Eduard Atuesta’s cross in the 30th.RSL changed goalkeepers at halftime, giving 23-year-old Andrew Putna his first MLS minutes. He finished with four saves. August 15, 2018 /Sports News – Local Ramirez scores twice in 1st start since trade, LAFC beats RSL Tags: MLS/Real Salt Lake/Soccer Written by Associated Presslast_img read more

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Results of 2015 Downtown Holiday Dash in Ocean City

first_imgELITEMenEvan Schmeizer, 4:59Jesse Schmeizer, 5:02Koley Greene, 5:05Nick Flukey, 5:14Evan Monteith, 5:20WomenKelsey Greene, 6:23Caitlin Greene, 7:24OPENMenTyler Greene, 6:14Jim Monaghan, 6:43Thomas Barrett, 6:52Patrick Mumman, 6:57Joe DelVescio, 6:58WomenMarissa Pacifico, 6:35Casey McLees, 6:36Brooke Tolson, 6:39Emily Buonadonna, 7:03Danielle Mathewson, 7:03 Sixty-five runners, including a handful of elves and little Santas, completed the second annual Downtown Holiday Dash on Friday night.On a clear and mild night under the lighted garland swags of Asbury Avenue, the participants completed a one-mile course from 12th Street to Seventh Street and back.The event was organized by Ocean City High School Track and Field Boosters Club in partnership with with the City of Ocean City, the Ocean City Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Merchants Association.The race included three staggered starts five minutes apart for elite runners, an open division and for a shorter kids’ competition.Evan Schmeizer was the top male finisher in 4:59, and Kelsey Greene was the top female at 6:23. Other top finishers include the following: The Downtown Holiday Dash drew 65 runners on Friday night, including a couple extra passengers dressed for the holidays.last_img read more

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New Campaign to Warn of Dangers of Balloons to Wildlife

first_imgEnvironmentalists say mass balloon releases can lead to litter and harm wildlife. (Photo courtesy Tumblr) Environmentalists say mass balloon releases can lead to litter and harm wildlife. (Photo courtesy Tumblr)By Donald WittkowskiOcean City’s Environmental Commission is planning a new public awareness campaign to warn of the dangers posed by balloons to shore birds, turtles and other wildlife.Instead of advocating for a new law to ban mass balloon launches, the commission hopes that a kinder, gentler approach will be a more effective way to educate the public about the environmental hazards.“Everyone thinks it’s neat to release balloons, not realizing that they can do harm to animals. But what goes up, must come down,” said Marty Mozzo, the commission chairman.The commission has drafted what Mozzo called a simple, one-page fact sheet that describes just how dangerous deflated or popped balloons can be to wildlife. It includes photos of animals killed by balloons after they ate them, he noted.Voting unanimously, the commission approved the fact sheet at its board meeting Tuesday. Mozzo next will show it to Mayor Jay Gillian and City Business Administrator Jim Mallon for their approval before it is made public.Mozzo said he prefers to educate the public about the environmental threat posed by balloons instead of pushing for a new law that would ban their mass release.“We felt that a simple facts sheet on balloon releases would have more of a far-reaching impact,” he said.He believes the public education campaign would be particularly effective during the summer tourism season, when the city’s population swells from around 11,000 year-round residents to an estimated 150,000 visitors.“Those people who come to town as summer tourists don’t know what our laws are,” Mozzo said. “They’re here to have fun. They don’t want to sit down and read our ordinance book.”Recently, members of City Council have debated whether Ocean City should join the neighboring seashore communities of Atlantic City, Margate, Ventnor and Longport in banning the mass release of balloons.Ocean City Councilwoman Karen Bergman said there is public confusion over whether mass launches of balloons and floating lanterns – and even more exotic things such as butterflies – are safe and legal. She believes regulations would clarify the issue, as well as help protect the environment.Bergman stressed she has no desire to crack down on the incidental release of a small number of balloons, particularly if children are involved.At a Council meeting in March, the mayor promised Bergman that his administration will “do some homework” and get back to the governing body with more information about balloon launches.After getting those assurances from Gillian, Bergman said she is content for now to wait for more details about the city’s education program in collaboration with the Environmental Commission.Doug Bergen, a spokesman for Gillian, indicated that “the consensus seems to be education” rather than passing a new law banning mass balloon releases.“Education can be as effective as the law,” Bergen said. “Any time you pass a law, there’s a question of enforcement.”In the meantime, Ocean City has already taken steps to protect the environment by “totally discouraging” the use of balloons during one of its major tourist attractions, the annual Night in Venice boat parade, Bergen said.Night in Venice contestants are instructed in an application form not to use balloons to decorate their homes or boats, according to Bergen.However, members of the environmental group Surfrider Foundation of South Jersey want the city to do more. They have appeared before City Council in recent months to lobby for a complete ban on mass balloon releases in Ocean City.They explained that turtles and other sea creatures often mistake deflated balloons floating on the water as jellyfish and try to eat them, which can block their digestive systems and cause them to starve to death.Birds can become entangled in the ribbons or strings attached to balloons, similar to the way they are snarled in discarded fishing line. Deflated balloons can also end up as litter, clogging bird nets or covering the birds themselves, including the chicks, according to the Surfrider Foundation.City Council has debated in recent months whether to impose a ban on mass balloon releases in Ocean City.The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service also has warned the public about the harm balloons can do to the environment. On its website, the agency tells the public: “Please don’t release your balloons.”“Balloons are great at birthdays, weddings, graduations and more, but once they get loose, balloons can pose a threat to many animals,” the Fish & Wildlife Service says.last_img read more

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Dear readers

first_imgDear readers,This year marks the Daily Bulldog’s fifteenth anniversary.Our goal has always been to bring Franklin County speedier, more local-centric news with journalistic integrity. Moreover, we wanted to create a central hub for this community to connect and share stories. From neighbors’ yard sales to the death of loved ones, what makes us most proud of this newspaper is how it serves as a convener for so many.Which is why we have decided to take a break from the comments section.We work hard to keep the commenting section a safe place, where opinions can be discussed between real people who actually read the articles. But lately that job is getting more and more difficult, and frankly it’s not where our hearts are at. We want our site to be a place you can feel at ease with while drinking your morning coffee, not a place where you have to avoid the lower half of the screen for fear of the arguments taking place below.With all that is happening in the world and the complexity of the issues being tackled on a national level, we feel strongly that it is a good time to take a break from the comments section. We still highly value your opinion, and we encourage readers to submit letters to the editor signed with your name and town of residence.This might not be forever, and we will still allow comments in certain sections, such as obituaries and the weekly nature photos. We thank you in advance for understanding this decision, and we encourage you to leave one last comment below if you choose. As usual, comments should be well thought-out and void of any expletives or threatening language.Thank you for all your support over the past fifteen years. We look forward to continuing to provide you with Franklin County’s news and a place to connect with this community that we love.-Ben & Amberlast_img read more

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Airport Bamboo

first_imgVisitors to the Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport this holiday season may notice a few new additions to the planting beds around the atrium garden — bamboo. While the tropical-looking plants may remind visitors of exotic locales, these particular bamboo plantings were selected for their cold tolerance and to teach travelers two important lessons about bamboo: it will grow pretty much anywhere and the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens at the Historic Bamboo Farm played an important role in bringing the plant to North America. The gardens, a University of Georgia Extension facility, donated the new bamboo stands to replace the airport’s previous bamboo collection, which was damaged during a record-breaking cold snap in January 2014. The old bamboo stands were comprised of Oldham’s timber bamboo, or Bambusa oldhamii. The cold snap — during which temperatures dipped as low as 18 degrees in Savannah and didn’t climb much above freezing for two days — left that bamboo looking ragged to say the least, noted Norman Winter, director of the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens at the Historic Bamboo Farm. “The atrium has been known for its beautiful bamboo, but the Bambusa oldhamii did not tolerate the extreme cold,” Winter said. “The unusually cold temperatures last January opened up the opportunity for a unique partnership between the airport commission and the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens.” The airport’s horticulture coordinator, Jamie Burghardt, worked with the airport to plant nine new beds of bamboo that should weather future cold snaps and acclimate to the stress of growing in such a public area. The Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens are home to one of the largest collections of bamboo in the Southeast, with 70 different varieties/taxa. Most were introduced to the property during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, when the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) owned the land and researchers used it as a testing ground for potentially profitable bamboo varieties. Burghardt chose bamboo that either had a historical significance in Savannah from the USDA era or that had an extraordinary track record of performance or beauty at the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens. At the airport, each bamboo specimen is accompanied by a display providing information about the bamboo variety, the bamboo’s history in Savannah and the history of the botanical garden. “This will be a great opportunity to not only show off the beauty of bamboo, but also to direct visitors to the garden to see the other species as well as the new developments,” Winter said. In the decades since the first bamboo groves were established on the 51 acres in southwest Chatham County, the gardens have become a place where tourists and locals alike enjoy the outdoors throughout all seasons. In addition to pick-your-own berry fields, holiday light displays, gardening classes, diverse and expanding plant collections and, of course, bamboo, the garden offers event venues for meetings, weddings and parties. For more information about the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens at the Historic Bamboo Farm, visit www.coastalgeorgiabg.org. For more information about cold-tolerant bamboo in your landscape, see Extension Bulletin 1357: “Growing Bamboo in Georgia.”last_img read more

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Panamanian President Will Visit Costa Rica to Learn about Health Experience

first_imgBy Dialogo July 17, 2009 SAN JOSE, 14 July 2009 (AFP) – The new president of Panama, Ricardo Martinelli, will visit Costa Rica on Wednesday to meet with President Oscar Arias and to learn about the experience of the public health services in trying to reduce patients’ wait times, the two governments announced on Tuesday. “Tomorrow, Wednesday 15 July, the president of the republic, Dr. Óscar Arias Sánchez, will host his Panamanian counterpart, President Ricardo Martinelli,” on his first foreign trip since taking office on 1 June, according to a statement issued by the Costa Rican president’s office. The meeting of the two leaders “will address an agenda of bilateral affairs,” the statement added. Martinelli will also dedicate his visit to getting to know “details of the Costa Rican experience with an automated appointment system” for users of the public health system, “which has achieved optimization of outpatient consultation and pharmacy services and elective surgery in that country,” the Panamanian government announced. The president will be accompanied by the Minister of Health, Franklin Vergara, and the Secretary of Innovation, Eduardo Jaén, according to the government statement. “This trip is the beginning of a series of consultations and visits that the administration team is planning with the aim of learning about the experiences of various models of care that have been successful in other countries,” the statement added. As president-elect before taking office, Martinelli visited Arias on 22 May, on which occasion they discussed forging closer ties in trade and tourism, among other areas. Both said then that they were in agreement on the expansion of the bilateral Free Trade Agreement, in effect since November 2008, to include products such as refined oil and insurance. The balance of trade between the two countries, which has increased notably in recent years, is favorable to Costa Rica, which sold 411 million dollars’ worth of its products and imported 242 million dollars’ worth of goods in 2008.last_img read more

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The financial benefits of living with less

first_imgWhen people think about “living with less,” visions of cramped living quarters and hipster couples espousing the virtues of straw-based plumbing may spring to mind. Condensing your belongings to fit into less than 250 square feet isn’t for everyone; the financial freedom associated with tiny living, however, definitely has universal appeal.Even if you don’t have plans to downsize, there is wisdom in living with less stuff. According to recent statistics, the average household has more than $130,000 in debt, $15,000 of which is on credit cards. What’s more, consumers are spending 9 percent of their household income on interest, to the tune of nearly $6,700 each year. It’s obvious we can’t afford the stuff we insist on accumulating.Still, escaping the siren song of the American dream is no small feat. “There are a lot of contributing factors to why and how we spend, from personality to life context and necessities,” says Dave Herman, director of applied sciences for Payoff, a financial wellness company. Herman asserts that the more you buy, and the more you design your life around spending, the more you associate your lifestyle with the items you own. “The more your thoughts and behaviors are focused around the hedonic experience of the immediate gratification,” he continues, “the less you’ll focus on the long term, such a saving $100 dollars every time you get paid.” continue reading » 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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What the heck does journey mapping have to do with cybersecurity?

first_img continue reading » As a company that provides SOC services to companies, monitoring security alerts 24×7, we perform journey mapping during our service turn-up.Many clients ask us why? Well, there are some great reasons, thanks for asking.Journey mapping is what sets Think|Stack apart from the other MSSP and MDR companies in the market.First, what is a journey map? A journey map is the map of a process or experience that captures the human experience with technology, procedure, data, system and people. It is often used to design user or retail experiences.However, we use our mapping to help us understand your business.  It helps us understand how your users and customers interact with your business, what data they share, where it goes, why and how it’s used and it provides context for the technology and data we are protecting. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces New Approvals for Low-interest Loans to Support Family Farming Operations in Seven Counties

first_img Economy,  Infrastructure,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced seven new low-interest loan approvals through the Commonwealth Financing Authority that will help small family farms make the necessary capital improvements to sustain and grow their livelihoods in Adams, Bedford, Berks, Columbia, Lancaster, Northumberland, and Snyder counties.“The survival of small family farms is not just essential to Pennsylvania’s economy, it’s critical to keeping rural Pennsylvania communities thriving,” said Governor Wolf. “By providing access to the capital necessary to acquire property, purchase equipment, and complete construction, we’re helping to keep our family farms competitive and successful.”The funding, approved through the First Industries program, will assist farmers with construction costs, help farmers start businesses, and enable them to acquire land to facilitate expansion. The First Industries program represents an important tool to support Pennsylvania’s agricultural sector and help individual farmers across the commonwealth.The following loans were approved:Adams CountyJoshua and Stacy Martin were approved for a $103,600, 10-year loan at a 2 percent fixed rate through the Adams County Economic Development Corporation to acquire a 10.05-acre farm in Straban Township and begin a business raising and selling boer goats and revive a family bakery business. The goat herd will start at 29 does and one buck and grow to 50 head, and the business may expand further onto an adjacent 50-acre property.Bedford CountyMatthew and Loretta Garman were approved for a $286,000, 12-year loan at a 3.5 percent fixed rate through the Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission to construct a 22,500-square-foot cage-free layer barn on their 110-acre farm in Hopewell Township. The layer barn will house 10,000 hens and their organic eggs will be sold exclusively to Handsome Brook Farm.Berks CountyRay and Jenifer Hershey were approved for a $400,000, 15-year loan at a 2.5 percent rate with a 7-year reset through the Greater Berks Development Fund to acquire the 83.4-acre farm in Bethel Township that they currently lease. The Hersheys use the land to operate a dairy farm with more than 650 cows.Columbia CountyM&K Family Farms, LLC was approved for a $400,000, 15-year loan at a 3.5 percent fixed rate through the SEDA-Council of Governments to acquire 35 acres of farmland and construct a 55,890-square-foot layer barn in Catawissa Township. The layer barn will house 40,000 hens and their eggs are contracted to be sold to Dutchland Farms, LLC, for four years.Lancaster CountyClayton and Deanna Andrews were approved for a $400,000, 15-year loan at a 2.5 percent rate with a seven-year reset through the EDC Finance Corporation to purchase a 115.3-acre farm property on Beaver Valley Pike in West Lampeter Township with 81 tillable acres, four farm buildings, and a residence. The Andrews will utilize the land and farm buildings to expand their crop operation.Northumberland CountyRobert, Tomilee, and Callen Foresman were approved for a $400,000, 15-year loan at a 3.5 percent fixed rate through the SEDA-Council of Governments to construct two 25,116-square-foot broiler breeder houses on their farm in Delaware Township. The broiler breeder houses will allow the family to fulfil a 12-year contract with Pedigree Chicks to produce eggs.Snyder CountyJames and Megan Adams were approved for a $400,000, 12-year loan at a 3.5 percent fixed rate through the SEDA – Council of Governments to acquire a 56-acre property in Beaver Township where they will operate a hog farm. Additionally, the Adamses will purchase Energy Recyclers, LLC, which operates a methane digester on the property that generates electricity to be used on the farm and sold back to the grid.A full list of approved projects and guidelines for each CFA program can be found on the DCED website. For more information about DCED, visit dced.pa.gov. Governor Wolf Announces New Approvals for Low-interest Loans to Support Family Farming Operations in Seven Counties May 22, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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