Bacterial community composition and diversity respond to nutrient amendment but not warming in a southern maritime Antarctic soil

first_imgA resumption of climate warming in maritime Antarctica, arising from continued greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, is predicted to lead to further expansions of plant populations across the region, with consequent increases in nutrient inputs to soils. Here, we test the main and interactive effects of warming, applied with open top chambers (OTCs), and nutrient amendment with tryptic soy broth (TSB), an artificial growth substrate, on bacterial community composition and diversity using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes in soil from a field experiment in the southern maritime Antarctic. Substantial effects of TSB application on bacterial communities were identified after 49 months, including reduced diversity, altered phylogenetic community assembly processes, increased Proteobacteria-to-Acidobacteria ratios and significant divergence in community composition, notably increases in the relative abundances of the gram-positive genera Arthrobacter, Paeniglutamicibacter and Planococcus. Contrary to previous observations from other maritime Antarctic field warming experiments, we recorded no effects of warming with OTCs, or interactive effects of OTCs and TSB application, on bacterial community composition or diversity. Based on these findings, we conclude that further warming of the maritime Antarctic is unlikely to influence soil bacterial community composition or diversity directly, but that increased nutrient inputs arising from enhanced plant growth across the region may affect the composition of soil bacterial communities, with possible effects on ecosystem productivity.last_img read more

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Real Salt Lake, FC Dallas play to scoreless draw

first_img Associated Press Written by July 27, 2019 /Sports News – Local Real Salt Lake, FC Dallas play to scoreless draw FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailFRISCO, Texas (AP) — Jesse González had five saves for his sixth shutout of the season and FC Dallas played to a scoreless draw with Real Salt Lake on Saturday night.Real Salt Lake coach Mike Petke was not on the bench after being suspended because of his conduct following Wednesday night’s Leagues Cup match against Tigres UANL. Petke was shown a red card after having heated words with referee John Pitti. The matter is pending investigation and MLS is withholding comment until a review of the incident is complete.Nick Rimando had two saves for Real Salt Lake (9-9-4) for his sixth shutout of the year and 150th of his MLS career.Santiago Mosquera had one of the best chances of the night for FC Dallas (9-8-6) on a breakaway in the 68th minute but his shot missed just right of the post. Tags: FC Dallas/MLS/Real Salt Lakelast_img read more

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Top Ten Gift Wines for the Holiday Season

first_imgA picture of the Reserve Room at Passion Vines. Have you ever been stuck for what to buy as a gift for someone?Many times you know that the person entertains, but you are really not sure what they drink.  The safest bet is to buy them a nice bottle of wine.  Contrary to popular belief, great wines do not need to cost a fortune.It was this in mind that drove us to reach out to Michael Bray, the founder of Passion Vines. Below is his top 10 list of best gift wines for this season.Some of Michael’s pick for top reds for gifts.RedsJohnson Harriss “Cuvee Wentz” Red Columbia Valley 2014 (Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Syrah) – $24.99Seven Falls Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon Wahluke Slope 2013 – $14.99L’Umami Pinot Noir Willamette Valley 2015 – $17.99Santi Solane Valpolicella 2013 – $16.49Indaba Mosaic Red Blend 2016 – $10.99 SparklingCasa Gheller Prosecco – $15.99Scramsberg Blanc de Blanc California 2013 – $33.99 All of the above listed wines are available and in stock at Passion Vines.  They have two convenient locations:Passion Vines Wine Bar & Spirit Company : 265 New Road Somers Point, NJ 08244Passion Vines Liquor Store & Warehouse: 3013 Ocean Heights Avenue Egg Harbor Twp, NJ 08234They can also be found online at: http://www.passionvines.com WhitesFelino Vina Cobos Chardonnay Mendoza Argentina 2015 – $14.99Kono Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough 2015 – $12.99Bodega Garzon Albarino Uruguay 2015 – $15.99last_img read more

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Ocean City Red Raiders Prep for Turkey Day “Bowl Game”

first_imgThe offense put up 35 points on Nov. 8 in a state playoff consolation game win against Washington Township. (Photos courtesy of OCHSfootball.com)   By Tim KellyThe cheering had barely stopped after the Nov. 8 victory at Carey Stadium when Ocean City High School football Head Coach Kevin Smith gathered the troops.“Great team win,” Smith told the squad, after their dominating 35-0 defeat of Washington Township in a state playoff consolation game. “But we still have one more big one left.”Smith was referring to the Red Raiders’ traditional Thanksgiving Day contest against the Pleasantville Greyhounds. The game, at Pleasantville, kicks off Thursday at 10 a.m.With two full weeks in between games, the Pleasantville contest feels like a “bowl game,” heightened even further by the game’s high stakes.Ocean City (4-5 overall, 3-2 in the West Jersey Football League’s Independence Division) can finish with a non-losing record with a win, which would be fitting for a squad in which three of its losses easily could have gone the other way.“These kids always came back and were always ready to play, even following some really tough losses,” Smith said after the Washington Township game. “I feel great for them, especially the seniors, to go off with a complete effort in all phases of the game in their last game at home.”The Raiders showed a lot of heart in all of their losses, including an overtime defeat against Oakcrest, a last second defeat on a 41-yard field goal against archrival Mainland, a loss at Triton after leading in the fourth quarter, and, the most excruciating defeat of all, falling one yard short and one play shy of knocking off heavily-favored Highland in the playoffs’ first round.It was the Raiders’ second straight year of earning a playoff appearance following nearly a decade of being on the outside looking in. With the jayvee and frosh teams enjoying winning seasons, the future looks bright for the program. On Nov. 8, all of the season’s bitter disappointments seemed to be washed away in their dominating performance over Washington Township. Travis Stoerrie (1) and Will Drain combine to bring down a Washington Township ballcarrier. The Raiders’ defense posted its second shutout of the season.“We knew we were better than (the won-loss record) showed,” said senior wideout-defensive back Brandon Lashley, who scored three offensive touchdowns and ran back an interception a school record 103 yards for a fourth score against Washington Township. “My teammates and my blockers were there all night,” Lashley said.In his weekly e-mail to friends of the program, Smith praised his players as well as the fans who supported the Raiders in loyal fashion, despite some tough losses. “Carey Stadium rocked this season,” Smith said, “Every game was exciting and – for good or bad — seemed to produce something memorable.”In addition to Lashley’s interception return and Ocean City’s amazing 80-yard game tying drive late in the fourth quarter against Mainland and the subsequent walk-off field goal, he mentioned two Ian Aungst-to-Lashley TD passes in the last six seconds of the half against Bridgeton; and a school record for passes and pass completions by Aungst versus St. Augustine“We didn’t win them all but the games were never boring,” Smith said. Things won’t get any easier moving forward. The Red Raiders enjoyed a long weekend off after the Washington Township game, but they will be facing an explosive Pleasantville squad (7-3) that crushed Cedar Creek 57-0 in the opening round of the Group II playoffs.The ’Hounds then traveled to Haddonfield last Saturday in the tournament semifinals. There, Pleasantville lost a hard-fought 28-6 verdict. Thus, both teams have strong incentive in addition to the traditional rivalry. The Raiders and Greyhounds will be gunning for a big win to end the season, and their seniors’ high school careers on a winning note. Brandon Pokrass breaks into the open field to gain yardage against Washington Township.last_img read more

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Greggs reports positive sales for spring season

first_imgGreggs said this week that like-for-like sales were up in the 18 weeks to May 5, due to increased footfall and favourable weather conditions.It has also benefited from an increase in the number of shops trading on Sundays, it said at its AGM in Newcastle on Monday. Chairman Derek Netherton said: “Like-for-like sales in the 18 weeks to 5 May 2007 were up by 4.9%, improving on the 3.9% increase for the first nine weeks already reported in March. This compares with a flat sales performance in the first 18 weeks of 2006.”Greggs is continuing a number of trials of new products and shop formats, with encouraging initial results, he said. It was also moving away from its previously decentralised management structure to build a national Greggs brand, he added.Last month Greggs launched the first phase of a £3 million marketing campaign, starring actor Patrick McGuinness, designed to build awareness of the brand.last_img read more

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Quiznos faces financial woes

first_imgAmerican sandwich giant Quiznos is facing financial difficulties.The firm, which peaked at 29 outlets in the UK in 2008, closed its head office in Hove at the start of 2011 and is still seeking a new master franchisee.Father and son Kazem and Michael Najafi had previously owned Quiznos’ UK licence and planned to open 500 outlets here.Companies House now lists the firm as being overdue with its last accounts in the UK. A few UK franchise outlets remain, supplied directly from the USA. One remaining franchisee told British Baker that a new master franchisee for the UK would be appointed shortly.In America, Denver-based Quiznos has closed 1,500 outlets in the last four years and has brought in restructuring advisers to help rework its finances.>>Recession hits US sandwich chainlast_img read more

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Joe Russo’s Almost Dead End Philly Run With Triple Tribute To The Band [Videos]

first_img[Video: monihampton]Setlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead | Fillmore Philadelphia | Philadelphia, PA | 11/25/2017 Set One: Jam -> Good Lovin’ > Ruben & Cerise -> Bertha > I Need A Miracle @ > The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down > Truckin # -> Space -> Truckin Reprise -> Born Cross Eyed JamSet Two: DD Solo -> Music Never Stopped, They Love Each Other $, Jam -> Let It Grow % > New Speedway Boogie ^ -> Terrapin SuiteEncore: The Weight &, [email protected] – With New Speedway Boogie Teases (SM & then MB), a “Fearless” (Pink Floyd) Tease (MB), possibly a “Good Lovin’” (The Rascals) Tease (MB), a short Duo Jam and an “In with the In Crowd” (Ramsey Lewis) Tease (MB)# – With a New Speedway Boogie Tease (M), a Black Throated Wind Tease (SM) and an Easy Wind Tease (SM)$ – With a Ruben & Cerise Tease (TH)% – With “Do It Again” (Steely Dan) And “Taxman” (The Beatles) Jams^ – With Let It Grow & Slipknot! Teases (Band)& – Verses in order: TH, SM, MB, JR & All[Photo: Rob Chapman] On Saturday night, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead returned to the Fillmore in Philadelphia for the second and final night of their Thanksgiving run. Obviously, the project led by Joe Russo offered up primarily classic Grateful Dead tunes highlighting Almost Dead’s characteristic energy and innovative style. However, showing that the group’s musical expertise is not limited to the Dead’s catalog, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead also worked in a number of covers by The Band throughout the night, making for a particularly out-of-left-field show.Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Offers Jam-Heavy Start To Philly Run [Videos]After an opening jam that eventually segued through “Good Lovin’” and “Ruben & Cherise”, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead landed in the perennial crowd-pleaser “Bertha”. An extended “I Need A Miracle” followed, with the band offering up a number of teases running the gamut from the Dead’s “New Speedway Boogie” to Pink Floyd and later a short Benevento/Russo duo jam and Ramsey Lewis’ “In With The In Crowd”.Jam > “Good Lovin’”Coming out of this massive jam, the band played their first cover of The Band of the night, “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down”, hinting at what was in store for the rest of the evening. To close out the set, a high-octane “Truckin’” led to an exploratory “Space” jam before “Truckin’” reprise, with set one finishing out with a “Born Cross Eyed” jam.“The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down”[Video: monihampton]For the start of set two, bassist Dave Dreiwitz kicked things off with a solo that eventually transitioned into “Music Never Stopped” with the full band. Following “They Love Each Other”, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead again used an untitled jam as a springboard into another song, this time “Let It Grow”, which eventually moved into “New Speedway Boogie”—a tune that was hinted at during the extensive “I Need A Miracle” jam in set one. To close things out for set two, the band performed a triumphant and inspiring rendition of the beloved “Terrapin Suite”.Dave Dreiwitz solo > “Music Never Stopped”As for the group’s encore, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead doubled down on their references to The Band, closing out the night with renditions of “The Weight” and ever-popular “Ophelia”.“The Weight” & “Ophelia”last_img read more

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‘Landscapes of Energy’

first_imgIn 1859, the first commercial oil well was drilled near Titusville, Pa. The modern oil industry that followed quickly changed landscapes around the world.By the 20th century, a burgeoning world of derricks, tanks, pipelines, and refineries required more roads, railways, and ship lines for distribution. Cities changed with the arrival of big oil, becoming denser and busier. With the advent of cheap cars, highways widened, clover-leafed, and spread into far suburbs.Despite all of this change, architectural historians have not often studied the effect of oil infrastructure on landscapes. Nor have they much studied the social implications of the spaces changed by the oil energy business, from abandoned oil fields to busted boomtowns — or even the destination of oil money.Most of it goes global as profits or sometimes philanthropy, ignoring localities and their blighted extractive landscapes, the holes in the ground that yield four-fifths of the world’s energy.Enter New Geographies 02, “Landscapes of Energy,” a booklike journal of 17 essays distributed by Harvard University Press. It addresses the fact that energy takes up space, and that in turn such space deserves scholarly inquiry.Contributors to the journal include the late Ivan Illich, a philosopher and critic of the technological world. His essay “The Social Construction of Energy” is published here for the first time. (“Energy” as an economic measure is a modern construct, he argues, and has suppressed social freedoms.)Other essays look at oil violence in Amazonia, pipelines and social justice, an energy history of Houston, the ambiguities of hydropower, humanity’s “enslavement” to energy, and architecture-certification programs that sidestep the fact that “architecture and urbanism (are) responsible for 75 percent of energy consumption.” (In that same essay, “(Against) the Greenwashing of Architecture,” Canadian architect Mirko Zardini concludes, “We can arrive to the point of questioning the necessity to build.”)“Landscapes of Energy” is the third in a “New Geographies” series launched in 2008 at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD). The journals, intended to bring geographical scale to modern urban design, appear every six months. (The next, out in the spring, will examine the “urbanisms of color,” how colors give meaning to cities.)The journals are conceived and edited by doctor of design students at the GSD, under the direction of A. Hashim Sarkis, a professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Design.Energy landscapes could become a new “subcategory” of inquiry for designers and architects, said Sarkis, by introducing “new conditions of visibility” for the energy systems that support cities.He moderated a Nov. 20 journal-launch panel at the GSD’s Piper Auditorium, a mixed-discipline collection of designers and scholars who vetted “Landscapes of Energy” ahead of time. (Sarkis, a practicing architect in both Cambridge and Lebanon, is also the Aga Khan Professor of Landscape Architecture and Urbanism in Muslim Societies.)The other panelists were architect Martin Felsen, co-founder of the Chicago firm UrbanLab; Mark Jarzombek, associate dean of the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; lawyer and linguist Sheila Jasanoff, professor of science and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School; and student of geographic space Ajantha Subramanian, a Harvard associate professor of anthropology and social studies.Systems involving oil-based energy exist on a large geographic scale, “yet they remain invisible” to scholars and often to energy consumers, said journal editor-in-chief Rania Ghosn, a GSD doctor of design candidate who introduced the panel. Making this unacknowledged infrastructure an object of study, she said, makes possible “appropriate scales of intervention.”And intervention — new policies, new laws — is often appropriate, said Subramanian. The energy infrastructure, when studied fully, often illuminates issues of social justice and reveals “a dialectic of space and power.”A post-colonial scholar who teaches a course on the “politics of nature,” Subramanian is studying workers at lead and cadmium mines in Oklahoma, people whom she said feel both intimate with the business of extraction and repulsed by it.In the oil business, there is a similar social unevenness, she said, pointing to the new journal’s essay by Gavin Bridge, “The Hole World: Scales and Spaces of Extraction,” which looks at “the oil hole” and the “disenfranchised habitations” around it.Landscapes of extraction are expressions of capitalism, wrote Bridge, but they are also “strategic sites for challenging the social relations of capitalism,” frictional borders where the status quo is questioned.That status quo shifts too. Just after World War II, the Western world was “celebrating landscapes of oil,” the smokestack industries, bustling highways, and blooming suburbs that were the outward signs of progress, said Ghosn. These landscapes no longer have a “romantic resonance,” she said, but the landscapes of renewable power do.Still, the wind farms, light rail systems, and treed rooftops of our imagined green future is a “romantic notion,” more affect than reality, said Jarzombek.He took aim at one of the journal essays, “Conduit Urbanism,” which imagines a future “post-carbon highway” in which old spaces — off-ramp interchanges, for instance — are converted to use in a “renewable-energy conduit.” Colorful illustrations show neat highways lined with magnetic-levitation rail lines and spinning wind turbines.This “piles on the clichés,” said Jarzombek, the idea of “a happy machine in the garden” that turns energy realities into a kind of Potemkin village.“All urbanism today is Potemkin,” he said, referring to the false villages lined up in the Crimea during the 18th century to impress the visiting Empress Catherine II. “Green landscaping,” he went on, in the panel’s sharpest digression, “is Potemkin ecology.”In the face of these well-meaning attempts to obscure “the reality of this messed-up world,” said Jarzombek, why not do what most of the journal suggests: Show the realities of how the energy machine and the building machine work. “Invisibilities need to be exposed,” he said.That exposure is what Sarkis called “elevating to visibility the performative function of architecture,” and then “celebrating it.”“Restoring visibility is not just trivial,” said Jasanoff, and should not stop with architects and urban designers. A “parallel piece of work” could come out of government and law schools, she said, in a study of the legal structures and institutions that make energy landscapes possible, and that in turn make related injustices possible.Design is a “tool for policy,” and “the rules and those who set them are increasingly important,” said Felsen. So society needs national urban priorities that meld technology and policy.One example, he said, is the issue of fuel-efficiency standards, which relates to auto design and engine technology. Why look at these standards in isolation? They need to be paired with a policy that, say, doubles public transit ridership.The new journal and its neglected topic “tries to get to the heart of some of the big social equity problems” rising out of the oil energy landscape, said Felsen — and that’s good. But the idea of relying instead on a world of alternative energy is problematic, he added. For one thing, less than 1 percent of the world’s energy comes from renewable sources, while the use of coal continues to increase.So instead of fighting existing energy systems, he said, why not institutionalize the best practices within them?Subramanian agreed, to a point. “Best practices are always partial experiments, with hidden underbellies which will arise after the fact,” she said. “That should keep us vigilant.”last_img read more

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Obama plan could boost health care for immigrants

first_imgMillions of undocumented immigrants could get a reprieve from the threat of deportation and a chance for legal employment in the U.S. under a recent proposed executive action from President Obama. Although the plan is currently under court injunction, if it’s implemented it could also boost access to health care and health insurance among immigrants—both undocumented and legal.The implications of the president’s plan are outlined in a March 26, 2015 article in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) by Benjamin Sommers, assistant professor of health policy and economics, and Northeastern University’s Wendy Parmet, an expert on health policy and law.For instance, the authors wrote, expanded job opportunities for undocumented workers could also expand their access to employer-sponsored health benefits. Also—if their incomes get a boost from greater access to jobs—they may be more willing to apply for private coverage.Legal immigrants or even citizens could benefit, too. If they are part of mixed-status families (in which some members are undocumented), they may until now have shied away from seeking health care or insurance because of the perceived threat of deportation. But if Obama’s plan is implemented it may reduce their fears. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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US boosting vaccine deliveries amid complaints of shortages

first_imgPresident Joe Biden says the U.S. is ramping up vaccine deliveries to hard-pressed states over the next three weeks and expects to provide enough doses to vaccinate 300 million Americans by the end of the summer or early fall. Biden is calling the push a “wartime effort.” He said Tuesday that his administration is working to buy an additional 100 million doses of each of the two approved coronavirus vaccines. And he acknowledged that states in recent weeks have been left guessing how much vaccine they will have from one week to the next. He called that “unacceptable” and said “lives are at stake.”last_img read more

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