What to expect when you visit the Emergency Room

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Anatomy of Fear The VOICE of HealthThe REAL Stories of the ERFrom Florida Hospital TAGSEmergency RoomFlorida HospitalThe VOICE of Health Previous articleOrange County connects with “The Millennial Lifestyle”Next articleIn case you missed it: The Apopka news week in review Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Please enter your name here Sitting on the edge of your couch, you’re likely drawn in by the wonder of what goes on in the TV-depicted emergency room. The sirens. The bright lights. The rush of medical teams to someone’s side. Medical dramas — both of fiction and of real-life accounts — tell emotionally charged stories about moments that test the human body — in mind, body, and spirit — bringing compassion and hope when every minute counts.And while no one ever wants to be in these emergent situations, our hearts know that medical emergencies appear when we least expect them and that these TV stories might, in some way, help us prepare if they ever do.But medical dramas are not the best ways to “prepare.” In fact, real-life emergency rooms are very different than those on TV, according to Nikki McGlone, RN, clinical nurse leader for the Florida Hospital emergency department service line. After over 19 years of experience as an emergency room nurse, McGlone insightfully shares that people can be fearful or overwhelmed, especially when they don’t know what to expect.And while you can never be fully prepared, McGlone shares her insight into what you might expect during an emergency room visit, with some tips to help reduce stress and improve your experience.What to Expect in the ERArrivalWhen you walk through the doors of an emergency department, the first thing you might see is people waiting for many reasons. Try to take a deep breath — you never know what to expect. “You could be the only one there, or at peak times there could be a crowd of people waiting to be seen for various reasons,” explains McGlone.“Trust that the emergency department will do everything possible to see you as quickly as possible,” says McGlone.She adds that Florida Hospital’s Emergency Departments are very diligent to create the most calming and welcoming environment possible while minimizing wait times. Due to the unpredictable nature of medical emergencies, emergency departments must see the most critical patients first, there could be a wait on any given day.RegistrationAfter you arrive, you’ll be greeted by a registration representative who will ask some questions and enter your information into the system. “The goal is to start your care as quickly as possible,” says McGlone. Having this information will enable the nurses to initiate your care in Triage.During registration, expect to share the following information:Your nameGenderDate of birthMailing addressName of primary care doctorReason for emergency department visitPhoto IDCare BeginsOnce you are registered your care begins.You’ll see a nurse who will review your:Chief complaint (reason for your visit to the emergency room)SymptomsVitals (blood pressure, pulse, and temperature)Acuity scale (from most life-threatening (1) to least life-threatening (5))Evaluation “Next, you are brought back into the emergency room and are seen by a medical provider in an appropriate space, which most of the time is a room, but it could be another treatment space within the emergency room,” states McGlone.Depending on the reason for your visit, you could be evaluated by an emergency medicine physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner, in addition to registered nurses and emergency room staff that are part of your care team. After your team talks to you and your family, they will develop an individualized plan of care.Individualized Care PlanYour plan of care could include monitoring, observation and other medical tests that will help the team to get more information about your health, such as:X-raysLabsCat ScanUltrasoundMRIEKG“Most of these diagnostic tests can be performed in the emergency room, but sometimes patients are transported to another location within the hospital or provided a prescription to have a diagnostic test completed on an outpatient basis and asked to follow up with their primary care doctors after leaving the emergency department,” explains McGlone.“Once all testing is completed, an emergency room medical provider determines whether each patient can be treated in the emergency room, transitioned to follow up with primary care outside of the hospital, or needs further evaluation and care within the hospital,” states McGlone. She reports that on average, 70 percent of patients go home from the emergency department with 30 percent admitted to the hospital.“Our goal at the emergency department is to stabilize and guide each person to the right plan of care moving forward,” says McGlone. Highly experienced staff do their best to attend to each patient and family’s every need within their ability by rounding in the emergency room and keeping each patient and family informed with progress, updates and care plans,” she adds.Follow-Up It’s important to know that the emergency department provides initial treatment and patients should have follow-up care that includes making an appointment to see their primary care doctor within a specific time frame or coordinating further specialist or diagnostic testing as appropriate.In addition, Florida Hospital helps patients that do not have a primary care doctor establish one to achieve continuity of care. The Florida Hospital Care Network offers patients throughout Central Florida quick access to some of the local area’s most experienced physicians and specialists in nearly every practice area. “Our approach is to help patients achieve their full health potential beyond our emergency department”.For some illnesses, Florida Hospital’s staff follow up with patients after returning home to see how they are feeling if they have followed up with their primary care doctor, and help them overcome any challenges in doing so,” notes McGlone.Emergency Room Preparation TipsNow that you have a better idea of what to expect at the emergency room, McGlone offers her emergency preparation tips:Don’t Hesitate“If you are questioning whether you need to go to an emergency room, you shouldn’t hesitate in going to be evaluated,” advises McGlone. It is always best to be safe and have trained medical professionals assess your health and provide guidance.PlanResearch your local emergency departments and have a plan for how you and your family will respond to different levels of medical emergencies in the future. Know when to call 9-1-1, when to go to the emergency room and when urgent care could be the best option for care.“For life-threatening medical emergencies, like any possible head or spinal cord injury, accident, heart attack or stroke, never delay in calling 9-1-1 immediately for the fastest response and medical attention,” advises McGlone.Throughout Central Florida, Florida Hospital’s Care Network includes 9 emergency room locations. Or for injuries or illnesses that don’t require emergency-level attention, Florida Hospital’s 31 Centra Care Urgent Care locations are available to help.Here are some things to include in your family’s medical emergency plan: Preferred emergency room and urgent care center names (this could include pediatric and adult emergency rooms for different members of your family)Emergency room address, driving directions and phone numberParking instructionsFamily call/contact listsItems to pack (phone charger, book, tablet, personal items, identification, insurance cards, comfort items, for example)Maintain Your Family Health Records and DocumentationKeeping a copy of your and your family’s medications/dosages, vaccinations, allergies, insurance card, personal identification and other important health records accessible in your wallet or purse could be extremely helpful to first responders and emergency medicine care teams during an emergency.“The quicker responders and care teams have this information, the faster they can facilitate the best possible care for you or a family member,” explains McGlone. She adds that during a time that will inherently be stressful, having this information on hand will help to reduce added pressure to gather it.The ER is a Place of Hope It’s important to know that the emergency department is staffed with very qualified doctors, nurses and medical professionals ready to help anyone that comes into its doors 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what.“The emergency department serves such an important role in our communities – it isn’t a “scary” place like what you might see on TV,” McGlone concludes. Please enter your comment! Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

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A roadmap to e-learning

first_imgDeloitteConsulting has offices in 33 countries. The dotcom revolution of 1999 gave itthe impetus to revolutionise learning at the company. Sue Weekes follows itsthree-point planI want to see 90 per cent of our practice e-educated within the next six months,”said Doug McCracken, then-CEO of global consultancy Deloitte Consulting. These words aren’t just the unrealistic ramblings of a chief executivetalking from his ivory tower, but rather the articulation of a vision born outof business need back in 1999. Dotcom fever and the internet were impacting onthe world of commerce then, changing the way business worked. Anyone not versedin the ways of the web was in danger of being left behind and McCracken knew hehad to mobilise his workforce to compete in such an environment. And mobilise them he did, setting the organisation on the path of athree-phase programme in e-learning, which in three years saw the consultingorganisation go from 95 per cent classroom-based training to 85 per cente-learning. It not only achieved its aims to train the workforce in vital newskills, but also embedded a culture of continuous learning into the company.”Learning is now multi-directional, actually surrounding theemployee,” says Jeff Schwartz, Deloitte’s global head of change, learningand performance. So how did the global consulting company make the shift – it has itsheadquarters in New York in the US and offices in 33 countries around theworld. Brook Manville, chief learning officer at Saba, whose technology Deloitteimplemented in the third stage of its transition, says the company’s”laser-like focus on specific business needs” stood it in good stead.”The most successful companies which wade into this new way of working arealways distinguished by that kind of focus: not just learning for its own sake,but learning for results-driven organisational capability,” he says. How they did it Phase 1 aim: To certify 15,000 consultants across 33 countries in a rangeof e-skills The decision to take an e-learning approach came out of necessity. Usingtraditional methods, a classroom-based training programme rolled out to 14,000people in more than 30 countries would have taken more than two years and costnearly $150m (£91m). Traditional methods were not only cost prohibitive, buttime scales were unrealistic. The organisation needed to address the capabilitygap quickly to meet market demand and avoid losing talent to competitors. An e-business certification programme was developed which blended 28 hoursof asynchronous e-learning with 12 hours of classroom workshops. It wasdelivered via a rudimentary ‘home-grown’ learning management system, whichprovided access to content and basic tracking facilities. The course wascompleted by partners and practitioners in 33 countries and compliance was tiedinto annual performance reviews. Overall, the programme was judged a success and the organisation was able toexpand its portfolio of projects based on emerging technologies. However, itlearned several lessons and realised the basic technology infrastructure it hadput in place for delivering training was inadequate to take the organisationthrough the next phase of an enterprise learning strategy. While it had set upa project team to drive the initiative, it lacked the standing of a morededicated group charged with responsibility for systematic and strategic changein the company. There were some cultural issues to address, including the fact thatconsultants tended to be Type A achievers – well-educated and driven by thechallenge of complex problems – so any future e-learning would have to caterfor this. Phase 2 aim: Centralising the learning function to provide innovative,just-in-time, on-demand and integrated learning programmes Deloitte Consulting had grown quickly over the previous 10 years which meanta number of local training organisations had been spawned. This was alsoconsistent with the company’s historically decentralised HR function. Withmarket conditions worsening in 2000, it needed not only to cut costs andconsolidate, but also to build a platform for new growth. As a first step, itcreated roles for a global managing director for HR and a chief learningofficer roles along with the CEO. These people supported the transformation toan e-learning organisation. It also created a Global Learning Council composedof senior managers who were able to direct learning initiatives to align withthe business. At the centre of its second phase, though, was the creation of itsLearningEdge group, an internal learning organisation. “While we knew what had to be done to our learning organisation, it wasdifficult to make the decision to commit to a rigorous transformation fromclassroom learning to e-learning,” says Nick van Dam, chief learningofficer at Deloitte. “Like most other firms, a majority of our learningorganisation was composed of classroom teachers. Clearly we would no longerrequire as many people with that particular skillset. We had to make toughdecisions and move quickly to replace nearly 50 per cent of our staff to allowfor the newly required skills in instructional design, e-learning andtechnology.” Today LearningEdge employs 60 people globally in its markets and services,design and learning technologies and infrastructure’s groups. It works alongsimilar lines as an agency, with account managers and designers who designcourses, then choose the best delivery method for them. At the heart of thelearning strategy is a self-directed learning culture which encouragesemployees to have learning pathways to map a learning journey through to adestination. Phase 3 aim: Implementing the right technical infrastructure During this phase of development, a content inventory revealed a degree ofoverlap when it came to courses – a product of the decentralisation. Therewere, for example, 70 different courses on project management being offeredacross the organisation. This not only confused the learners choosing thecourses, but also led to inconsistency and high costs. With the e-business initiative completed and process, organisation andcontent development under control, Deloitte was able to focus on implementing atechnical infrastructure that would allow it to grow into a learningorganisation. This meant installing a robust platform that could deliver andtrack the progress of thousands of learners around the world. It decided onSaba as a technology partner and also struck up a partnership to offer itsclients the Saba LMS system, recognising that clients would probably havesimilar problems. The date for the Saba LMS going live for was October 2001, just one monthafter the September 11 terrorist attacks forced Deloitte out of its New Yorkoffice space. The full-scale switch to e-learning was essential to supportuninterrupted learning, given the moratorium on travel and classroom trainingafter the attacks. “Without the Saba system to support our e-learning efforts, we mighthave become just another firm to reduce training altogether,” says VanDam. “Instead, we have been able to offer more training to morepractitioners throughout the downturn.” The LMS lets Deloitte know how many unique users are participating in alearning programme by region, the number of courses offered in each region, andusage ratio per office. Saba has also helped with content quality saysDeloitte, with LearningEdge now able to review usage and feedback reports tosee which courses are most effective. Return on investment The effectiveness of the e-learning programme overall is measured in termsof usage, and more than 90 per cent of all consultants now participate ine-learning. Deloitte believes it has made 50 per cent savings on training,while tripling the number of learning hours per practitioner. But equallysignificant is that e-learning enables Deloitte’s employees to keep up to speedwith current business issues and technologies, which is how it delivers valueto clients. The only alternative to continuously improving its people would beto hire ‘pre-fabricated’ experts, which of course isn’t realistic. “What we knew yesterday was extremely valuable to our clientsyesterday,” says Jeffery Schwartz. “Continuous learning is central towhat Deloitte Consulting is all about. “Effectiveness is found in our ability to be flexible, and quicklyredeploy practitioners with the right skills. With e-learning, we found a wayto train people without knowing if the client business was signed on yet. And,once it is signed on, we have so little time to ramp up that we need fastaccess – there’s just no time to plan training trips any more. Not so long ago we had the luxury of putting people in two to four-week bootcamps and then assigning them to the same work for two to three years. That’sjust not the business reality today. Today we work with 100 technologycompanies – that’s a lot of information to keep up with for ourpractitioners.” Nick Van Dam, chief learning officer at Deloitte Consulting, is theauthor of a new book on e-learning featuring implementation lessons and casestudies from companies making e-learning work. All royalties from e-LearningFieldbook, published in August by McGraw-Hill, will be donated toe-Learning forKids (www.e-learningforkids.org), a non-profit foundation for children whichprovides schools in need with internet-based learning solutions. In summaryDeloitte’s top tips to leading the fieldNick Van Dam, chief learning officer at Deloitte Consulting,says e-learning offers employees a great value proposition because they canenhance their skills set without any approval for classroom training from theirmanagement. His top tips are:– Start with development of a new vision of learning and abusiness case for e-learning– Launch e-learning initiatives which are aligned with specificbusiness goals– Gain support from people that matter including the board, ITdepartment the training staff and the learner– Leverage the core e-learning expertise of successfule-learning providers to jump start your learning strategy– Link learning to performance– Design learning courseware that is relevant for the learnerand which is engaging and interactive.– Remember marketing and communication of e-learning is acritical component of learning implementation Previous Article Next Article A roadmap to e-learningOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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