Investment in Indoor Soccer Training Facility

first_imgNova Scotia’s soccer community will receive a boost thanks to a provincial infrastructure investment of $3 million. Premier Darrell Dexter made the announcement today, June 14, at Soccer Nova Scotia’s Indoor Soccer Training Centre in Halifax. “We know that more Nova Scotians are registered for soccer than any other sport in this province, and demand for indoor facilities is high,” said Premier Dexter. “This investment will go a long way to ensuring more Nova Scotians have opportunities year-round to live active, healthy lives. “By making the healthy choice the easy choice, we are making life better for Nova Scotians in every region of the province.” Soccer Nova Scotia, the governing body for soccer in the province, plans to expand its current facility at the Mainland Common. Plans include an additional indoor soccer field, seating for 1,000 spectators, increased meeting areas and upgraded space for players and coaching staff. “This facility will lessen the severe shortage of indoor soccer facilities in HRM. It will meet the programming needs of all ages, tiers, and genders that are presently not served due to unavailability of facilities,” said George Athanasiou, CEO of Soccer Nova Scotia. Soccer Nova Scotia has also committed to making space available for use by other sports. “This isn’t just about soccer. Let’s not forget that other field sports will also be served by this facility, such as football, rugby and ultimate frisbee,” said Mr. Athanasiou. “This facility will provide an indoor training environment that will help prepare players for the outdoor game,” said Maggie Malone, a soccer player from Clayton Park. “It will allow my club team to train in a proper soccer facility in the winter months rather than school gyms. This will help improve our training and provide more opportunity for everyone involved in the game at all ages.” The total cost of the project is $9 million. In February, the Government of Canada announced $1.6 million in funding for this project from the Recreation Infrastructure Canada program. The Halifax Regional Municipality also committed $1.9 million at the time and provided the land for the expanded Soccer Nova Scotia facility. The Department of Health Promotion and Protection will provide the provincial funding from its Building Facilities Infrastructure Together (B-FIT) program. The program, launched in 2007, provides funds to build, replace and upgrade major recreation facilities in Nova Scotia. Under B-FIT, the province has committed more than $67 million to 37 major infrastructure projects, generating more than $200 million worth of construction.last_img read more

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Heres how much more Canadians will have to pay for fruits and

TORONTO — The sliding loonie could make it harder for some Canadians to eat their Florida oranges or California heads of lettuce this year.The dropping dollar, which dipped below the 70-cent U.S. mark on Tuesday, is expected to continue to leave shoppers with bigger grocery bills, especially when it comes to buying fresh fruit and vegetables.It really boils down to the dollarNearly all fruit and vegetables consumed in Canada are imported, making them more susceptible to the loonie’s fluctuations.“It really boils down to the dollar,” said Kevin Grier, an agriculture and food market analyst.Last year, fruits and veggies jumped in price between 9.1 and 10.1 per cent, according to an annual report by the Food Institute at the University of Guelph. The study predicts these foods will continue to increase above inflation this year, by up to 4.5 per cent for some items.Slumping loonie holds silver lining for Canadian retailers as cross-border shopping expected to ‘all but die’Canadian dollar touches fresh 12-year low, raising bets on Bank of Canada rate cutBrace for another year of slow growth and loonie below 70 cents, Canada’s top forecasters warnSylvain Charlebois, the report’s lead author, said for every U.S. cent the dollar drops, foods that are imported likely increase one per cent or more.These prices have been on the rise for years.In November 2011, one kilogram of apples cost an average of $3.35 in Canada, according to Statistics Canada. Four years later, the same amount cost $4.12.One kilogram of celery, meanwhile, increased from $2.23 to $3.08 over the same time frame.While the increased costs have dealt a blow to everyone’s wallet, they have a more pronounced effect on Canadians living on a tight budget or in remote regions, where fresh fruit and vegetables are more expensive than in more urban areas.People living in northern and remote communities are most likely to be hurt by these rising costs, said Diana Bronson, the executive director of Food Secure Canada.In Nunavut, for example, residents typically pay about two times more than the Canadian average for staples, according to the Nunavut Bureau of Statistics.There, a kilogram of carrots cost $6.17 in March 2015, while the Canadian average was about $4 less.Lower- and middle-class people — many “who can’t find a job that will pay them enough to ensure that they can afford a healthy diet for their families” — also feel the pinch of rising food prices, said Bronson.“It’s students. It’s senior citizens. It’s the working poor. It’s new immigrants,” she said, adding that aboriginals and visible minorities are disproportionately impacted.When fruits and vegetables rise in price, it makes it more difficult for these groups to buy enough to get their daily fruit and vegetable intake.“The wrong kind of food is cheap, and the right kind of food is still expensive,” said Bronson. She hopes the new Liberal government’s promised national food policy will address this imbalance. read more

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