Four journalists released

first_imgNews Under Chinese pressure, Nepal sanctions three journalists over Dalai Lama story Three journalists, including the Secretary General of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, Bishnu Nisthuri were among eight people released on 25 February. He had spent 21 days in prison. Security forces meanwhile detained for a week the editor of a weekly newspaper in the east of the country. Organisation News February 25, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Four journalists released Follow the news on Nepal RSF_en News Help by sharing this information NepalAsia – Pacific May 29, 2019 Find out more June 8, 2020 Find out more Nepalese journalists threatened, attacked and censored over Covid-19 coverage NepalAsia – Pacific The army on 1st March released Dipin Rai, editor of the weekly Mukti Aawaj published in Jhapa, western Nepal. He said he had been released unconditionally but refused to give any information about his questioning by the security forces.——————————————————————–Three journalists released, another one arrestedReporters Without Borders repeated an appeal for the release of the nine journalists still imprisoned in Nepal after three journalists were released on 25 FebruaryThe authorities freed Bishnu Nishthuri, Secretary General of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, after 21 days imprisonment; Khem Bhandari, editor of the daily Abhiyan, and Sujeeb Bajracharya, editor of the daily City Times. Seven public figures, including a former minister and an ex-ambassador, were released on the order of Baman Prasad Neupane, head of the Kathmandu district administrative office.Khem Bhandari, detained since 16 February, was sentenced by the authorities in Kanchanpur district in the east of the country, to pay a fine of 5,000 rupees (50 euros) for infringing the press law.The previous day, Dipin Rai, editor of the regional weekly Mukti Aawaj and local official for the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, was arrested at his home by security forces in Jhapa, east of the country. All publications in the Jhapa district were closed on 1 February but Dipin Rai had republished his weekly on 22 February. The journalist has been held since 23 February at the barracks of the Chaar Aali battalion in Jhapa.________________________________________________________________________________22.02.2005Eleven journalists imprisonedReporters Without Borders has renewed an appeal for the release of 11 journalists currently being held in prisons in Nepal.Six of those being held were among at least 16 journalists security forces picked up after King Gyanendra seized power on 1 February and declared a state of emergency.Nepal was already holding five journalists before the royal coup, making it, after China, Cuba and Eritrea, the world’s fourth largest prison for journalists.”Until they are released we will continue to urge the international community, particularly the European Union, to apply political and economic sanctions against Nepal”, the worldwide press freedom organisation said. It was particularly regrettable that Nepal was using exceptional and anti-terror laws to detain the journalists, it added.The six journalists still being held after their arrest on the orders of the palace are:Bishnu Nisthuri, Secretary General of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, arrested on 4 February.Naryan Adhikari, RSS and Kalifa FM, arrested 13 February.Basanta Parajuli, Gorkhapatra and Synergy FM, arrested 13 February.D. R. Panta, Kantipur, arrested 15 February.Sujeeb Bajracharya, City Times, arrested 16 February.Khem Bhandari, Abhiyan, arrested 16 February.The security forces have used exceptional laws to keep the journalists in prison. Narayan Adhikari and Basanta Parajuli, arrested in Chitawan district, were placed in custody for 90 days under the state of emergency. Police who arrested them said it was for criticising the king’s orders. Their families can visit them daily for 10 minutes. In the far west of the country, Bhandari, editor of the local daily Abhiyan, was detained for covering a local opposition demonstration. Police had previously arrested him at the beginning of February. Nepal: RSF’s recommendations to amend controversial Media Council Bill to go further Receive email alerts News May 17, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

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Digging yields clues

first_imgNature vs. nurture has long been one of the great debates in science — is behavior hard-wired into the brain, or determined by environment?In at least some cases, Harvard researchers are showing, how animals behave is in their genes.As described in a Jan. 16 paper in Nature, a team of researchers led by Hopi Hoekstra, professor of organismic and evolutionary biology and molecular and cellular biology, studied two species of mice – oldfield mice and deer mice – and identified four regions in their genome that appear to influence the way they dig burrows.“Given that burrowing is such a complex behavior, it was surprising that it may be controlled by just a few genes,” Hoekstra said. “More importantly, it looks like the genetics are modular, so if we think in terms of how do you ‘build’ a complex trait, it could be that as you start to put these different modules together, they add up to this complex behavior.”According to Jesse Weber, the paper’s lead author and a former graduate student in the Hoekstra Laboratory: “People have long been fascinated about how and why animals build homes. I believe this is one of, if not the first attempt to determine which genes are associated with the evolution of animal architecture.“Although we have not yet identified the exact genes that are involved, this study sets the foundation for research that will do precisely that,” he added. “As soon as the mutations or genes are found, I think it opens the very exciting opportunity to explore whether the same genes/mutations affect mammalian instincts in general.”Though closely related, the species build drastically different burrows. While the deer mouse digs relatively shallow and simple burrows, oldfield mice burrows are complex, complete with a long entrance tunnel, a separate nest chamber, and an escape tunnel that nearly reaches the surface.In the field, Weber excavated the intricate burrows of oldfield mice across their range in the southeastern United States, and found that whether in hard-packed clay or sandy dunes, the length of the burrows was remarkably constant. This suggested that their burrowing behavior might be more strongly influenced by genes than environment.To examine the role of genetics in producing differences in burrows, Weber and his colleagues began by crossbreeding the mice. When placed in a burrowing box in the lab, the new, hybrid mice dug deep, complex burrows similar to those of the oldfield mice.“That was a bit of a surprise, because we might guess that a hybrid would build an intermediate burrow, because it got some genes from one parent and some from the other,” Hoekstra said. “What this suggests is that the genes involved act in a dominant fashion.”When researchers crossbred the hybrid mice with deer mice, the results were striking, Hoekstra said. While some in the group continued to build complex burrows, others built burrows that combined traits from both species.“When we genotype those second-generation hybrids, and measure their burrowing, we’re able to see if there are any genetic regions that the small-burrowers have in common that aren’t present in mice that build larger, more complex burrows,” Hoekstra said. “Those regions are then thought to harbor genes that control the difference in behavior.”What researchers discovered, she said, were four regions of the genome that appear to play a role in burrow design – each of the first three added about three centimeters to the length of the burrow’s entrance tunnel, while the fourth made mice approximately 30 percent more likely to dig an escape tunnel.The next step is to begin identifying which specific genes are tied to burrowing behavior, and then to investigate how changes in those genes work in the brain to cause mice to build different burrows.“One interesting aspect of this is that we are hypothesizing that pathways that are involved in addiction might be involved,” she said. “These mice look like they’re addicted to burrowing. It’s too early to say anything definitely, but that’s one area we are exploring.”Hoekstra emphasized that she isn’t suggesting that all behaviors have genetic origins.“It’s clear that both genetics and environment contribute to most behaviors. There are some that are entirely dependent on environment, and there may be some that are all genetic, but most are somewhere in between,” she said. “What we’ve shown in this case is that for this behavior, in these two species of mice, there is a large role for genes.”last_img read more

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Memorial Mass held for Seeberg

first_imgMore than 400 students, faculty, staff, family and friends gathered together in remembrance of Elizabeth “Lizzy” Seeberg, a Saint Mary’s College student who died Friday. The College held a memorial Mass in Regina Hall’s Chapel Monday evening. Members of the Saint Mary’s College community filled the chapel. Attendees filled all of the chapel’s seats; many attendees stood or sat on the ground. Fr. John Pearson celebrated the Mass. “It’s hard to believe, that it’s barely 72 hours since shock descended on McCandless Hall and Saint Mary’s from Lizzy’s death,” Pearson said. “It’s been such a strong reality that in some weird way it feels like the feelings and emotions and reactions have been going on for a very long time.” Pearson shared his experience meeting Seeberg and said her bright personality and sunny disposition affected everyone she met. “Here at Saint Mary’s we grieve for Lizzy both because of the presence and friendship and vitality she left us with, and because we know we will miss all that she could have been here and how she might have placed her own particular stamp on our community, our family,” he said. Lizzy’s father Tom Seeberg, as well as other family and friends, attended the Mass. Carol Ann Mooney, president of the College, participated in the Mass as the lector. At the end of the service, Seeberg’s father spoke to the congregation. Karen Johnson, vice president of Student Affairs, said Saint Mary’s College would provide transportation for any students who wished to attend the funeral Friday. The visitation will be held Thursday at N.H. Scott & Hanekamp Funeral Home, located at 1240 Waukegan Road in Glenview, Ill. from 4 to 9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held at 10 a.m. Friday at St. Norbert Church, located at 1809 Walters Ave. in Northbrook, Ill. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Christ the King Jesuit College Prep at www.ctkjesuit.org or Erika’s Lighthouse at www.erikaslighthouse.orglast_img read more

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Government funding ends April 28; NAFCU following

first_img continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Congress has until April 28 to pass a bill authorizing continued federal government spending to avoid a government-wide shutdown. The government is currently running on a continuing resolution that passed Congress in December.In a budget proposal released in March, President Donald Trump requested a $30 billion increase in defense-related spending and an $18 billion cut to non-defense programs. As a part of the cuts, Trump proposed eliminating the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund program. NAFCU reiterated the importance of this program to credit unions in a letter to leaders of key House and Senate subcommittees last month. The association will monitor the program throughout the upcoming government funding negotiations.NAFCU will also watch out for regulatory relief-related legislation being wrapped into any future spending bill, such as provisions creating a five-person commission at the CFPB. Credit unions are encouraged to reach out to their members of Congress urging them to support regulatory relief measures as part of an ongoing campaign through NAFCU’s Grassroots Action Center.NAFCU is also awaiting more details related to the Financial CHOICE Act. Last week, a revised memo outlining the next draft of the bill was circulated by House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, to committee members. According to the memo, the bill would repeal the Durbin interchange amendment and implement other reforms of the Dodd-Frank Act that NAFCU has been seeking for credit unions.last_img read more

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Home Ministry’s Rp 168b new normal video contests sparks outcry

first_imgAnother social media user, @YBRAP, also challenged the government, saying “Pay me 50 billion and I’ll make the greatest video for this country and you can [keep] the rest”.Pay me 50B I’ll make the greatest video for this country u can take the rest. How? https://t.co/k4440WleN8— 👑 (@YBRAP) June 22, 2020 A video contest run by the Home Ministry to promote the so-called new normal has sparked criticism from the public and activists, who have called the initiative costing Rp 168 billion (US$ 11.8 million) unnecessary.Minister Tito Karnavian said his ministry, in collaboration with the COVID-19 task force, the Finance Ministry, the Health Ministry, the Administrative and Bureaucratic Reform Ministry, the Trade Ministry and the National Agency for Border Management (BNPP), had created the initiative to enhance compliance with COVID-19 health protocol through a competition between regions. The Home Ministry said on Monday that it had received 2,517 video submissions for the competition titled “Productive and Safe from COVID-19” and had picked 84 winners from various regions. The competition was divided into seven categories: traditional market, modern market, hotels, restaurants, tourism spots, public transportation and one-stop integrated service (PTSP).The task was to produce a two-minute video picturing the successful implementation of health protocol in either one, several or all seven categories.“In creating the video, the regional administration should draft the health protocol involving health experts and stakeholders in the region,” Tito said as reported by kompas.com on Monday. “So there are 84 winners consisting of the first, second and third place for the seven categories and four clusters with a total of Rp 168 billion in the form of regional incentive funds [DID].”The winners get Rp 3 billion in prize money, while those coming second and third get Rp 2 billion and Rp 1 billion respectively. However, the initiative did not sit well with members of the public.Anita Wahid, the third daughter of late president Abdurahman “Gus Dur” Wahid, lambasted the initiative through her twitter account @AnitaWahid.“Rp 168 billion for a video competition. How many people could get mass swab tests with such amounts of money? How many medical staff could be added for COVID-19 patients’ treatment with such amounts of money?” she tweeted.168 milyar buat lomba video 😳Kalo buat swab test massal bisa buat berapa orang ya?Kalo buat nambah kapasitas nakes dan penanganan pasien bisa buat nambah berapa banyak ya? https://t.co/QzZaGJun4M— Anita Wahid (@AnitaWahid) June 22, 2020 The Finance Minister’s expert staff member Yustinus Prastowo explained that the competition was only one of the mechanisms for the central government to distribute the regional funds.“The DID is a form of support from the central government for regional governments in dealing with the pandemic, […] so it’s not a personal prerogative of the region heads,” he said through his twitter account @prastow on Monday, explaining that the prize money would go into the regional accounts, not to individuals, and the Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) would take part in monitoring the funds.“The total funds allocated for the DID is Rp 13.5 Trillion. It is distributed proportionally to each region. Just a little amount of it, Rp 168 billion, is distributed through this competition,” he added.Topics :last_img read more

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Inauguration marks new beginnings

first_imgTuesday night’s USG meeting, which featured the swearing in of President Andrew Menard, Vice President Rini Sampath and the 2014 USG Senators, marked the end of the road for USG’s 2013 representatives and a new beginning for student government at USC.Mr. President · USG presidential elect Andrew Menard is sworn in as USG student body president during Tuesday’s USG meeting. – Austin Vogel | Daily TrojanIn a crowded gallery of the Ronald Tutor Campus Center, incoming officials took oaths “to uphold the undergraduate constitution, by laws and code of ethics to perform any tasks and duties which they are delegated.”After Vice President Ryan Park gave a farewell to the old USG senators, the new Senate had a brief meeting, overseen by Sampath.The lone item on the agenda was a speech by Menard, in which he thanked his running mate and those who elected him.“I’m truly humbled by the task before us, and honored by the trust the student body has placed before Rini and me,” Menard said.Menard outlined numerous goals for his term, all of which rest on his pledge to faithfully represent USC student concerns, in dialogue with campus administration and elsewhere.“The role of student government has always been to represent the voice of the student body,” Menard said. “As president I will initiate, coordinate and guide student efforts aimed at improving student life activities, and I will always fight for the preservation of student rights.”Along with defending the interests of students, Menard wants to cultivate a greater sense of community on campus. He promised that his administration will work to reach out to students and form a more cohesive atmosphere at USC.Lest one think these are empty promises, Menard says that changes he proposed are already taking place. Chief among these is a recently passed amnesty policy, designed to protect students who report medical emergencies from repercussions.Though the vision expressed in Menard’s speech was expansive, it was checked by a basic sense of responsibility toward fellow students. During his time at USC, Menard said he has recognized a simple truth: the need for students to be kind and supportive of one another.“Every day I believe that we are called to do small things with great love and intention for our fellow classmates,” he said. “We are all part of the Trojan Family, and together we will strive to improve our great university.”last_img read more

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