County Board of Supervisors extends local emergency proclamation for Lilac Fire recovery

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News, Wildfires Tags: Lilac Fire FacebookTwitter Updated: 3:56 PM Posted: January 9, 2018 KUSI Newsroom County Board of Supervisors extends local emergency proclamation for Lilac Fire recoverycenter_img SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The county’s estimated cost of cleanup and erosion control in areas affected by the Lilac Fire stands at $3.9 million, officials said Tuesday as the Board of Supervisors voted to extend a state of emergency in connection with last month’s massive and destructive blaze.San Diego County could recoup about half that cost from a federal grant. Officials are requesting additional state and federal reimbursement that would cover efforts beyond initial erosion control, road repair, debris removal and other cleanup.By the county’s count, 113 homes were destroyed and 55 were damaged in the Lilac Fire, which broke out in Pala Mesa on Dec. 7. Driven by Santa Ana winds, the blaze that scorched 4,100 acres in North County over several days also destroyed two business structures and damaged another five. Ninety other buildings, such as sheds or barns, were destroyed and 18 were damaged, according to the county.The county has overseen the removal of more than 14,500 pounds of hazardous waste from areas burned by the fire; repaired 1,300 feet of guardrail along Old Highway 395; replaced 15 road signs and posts that were damaged; and removed 15 trees that toppled in public areas.The overall cost of the fire response has not yet been calculated. January 9, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

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Research team develops acoustic topological insulator idea to allow for hiding from

first_img Citation: Research team develops acoustic topological insulator idea to allow for hiding from sonar (2015, March 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-team-acoustic-topological-insulator-idea.html , arXiv Around the bend. An acoustic topological insulator would guide sound waves around its edges, as shown in this simulation. Credit: Z. Yang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2015) Explore further (Phys.org)—A team of researchers working in Singapore has come up with what they believe is a way to apply a topologic insulator to an object to prevent sound waves from being bounced back and detected by a source. They have published their work in the journal Physical Review Letters. Have researchers discovered the sound of the stars? Journal information: Physical Review Letters © 2015 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientists have developed ways to coat materials with other materials to causes electric current to remain on the surface, preventing damage to sensitive parts inside—such coatings are called topological insulators and are generally based on causing less scattering and creating a band gap. In this new effort, the research team has expanded on that idea to bring a similar result for insulating objects from sound waves.To make a topological insulator work against sonar would involve creating a coating or cover that could cause sound waves to propagate around an object (instead of scattering) rather than allowing them to be bounced back to a receiver. To make that happen, the researchers envision a cover made up of a lattice of spinning metal cylinders, each of which would be surrounded by a bit of fluid which would itself be contained within an acoustically transparent shell. The same fluid would be used to fill the spaces between the cylinders, but it would not move. Because of the spinning movement inside, a vortex would be created in the fluid that surrounds the cylinders. In this setup, sound waves would not be able to move through the center of the structure due to a periodic pattern that would produce a sonic band gap—but the rotating fluid around the center would allow for causing propagation to occur in a predefined direction—the edge states, the team notes, could guide sound waves with high precision. A submarine covered with such an insulator would be invisible to sonar because sound waves sent in its direction would be routed in a direction away from where they came from, preventing them from bouncing back to the source.The work thus far by the team is purely theoretical, but they suggest there is no reason to believe it would not work in practice. The most difficult part they note, would be dealing with irregular “bumps” on a surface, which could throw off the propagation if not handled properly. More information: Topological Acoustics, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 114301 – Published 20 March 2015 . dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.114301 . On Arxiv: arxiv.org/abs/1411.7100ABSTRACTThe manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as “topological edge states,” has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.last_img read more

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Overcoming the Challenges of Data Analytics

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals June 6, 2014 Besides being one of the primary metrics used for selling advertising space on websites, analytics can be powerful in determining the type of content consumers are looking for and help businesses better tailor their online experiences for customers.However, with analytics programs able to turn any interaction with a website into a number, it’s important to keep in mind that most of those numbers cannot make a website better. Instead, it is the job of every site to determine which metrics are most valuable to them, then decide how and to what extent to use those numbers to determine future content direction and best practices. In news-speak, this would be called taking an editorial approach to the data.   Discovering valuable insights within the analytics noiseWhen used correctly, analytics can reveal insights about content and websites that are otherwise invisible. But analytics can often create a cacophony of noise with no obvious message, turning a tool that is intended to clarify user experience into a confusing mess of numbers.Related: 9 Online Ad Campaign Stats You Must TrackMarketers report their problems with analytics often surround basic questions: who, what, when (and for how long), where and why are people viewing their content?Each one of these problems raises another set of questions: Which is the best metric to use to answer this question? Does a metric exist to measure this? What do I do with this information once I’ve acquired it?  “Friends don’t let friends measure pageviews”The simplest metric to measure is a pageview count, but just because it is easy to log does not mean it is valuable. Too many publishers put too much emphasis on the importance of clicks, mistaking a user’s action for a positive impression. Valuing clicks, which are only truly useful for ad-driven sites, can give a mistaken impression about a user’s experience and often results in publishers delivering content that user don’t really want.“Are a lot of pageviews per visit are good thing (“the visitor loved our site so much!”), a bad thing (“our site is so bad it takes 23 pages to find what you’re looking for!”) or a horrible thing (“After a 23-page hunt, the visitor gave up!”)? Measuring only pageviews, how would you ever know?” writes Avinash Kaushik on Think with Google.Perhaps the only way to rationalize the continued obsession with pageviews is that this information is easily obtainable, easily quantifiable and easily understandable to those who don’t work regularly with analytics.But even seemingly simple and established metrics like “time on page” or “bounce rate” have their limitations.  Related: This Software Company Can Boost Your Retention RateSo how do you measure true engagement?Viral content site Upworthy, which does not use banner ads, wrote it was changing its primary metrics for gauging content from pageviews to “total attention on site” and “total attention per piece,” which it defines as more precise than the more common “time on page” metric.“We built attention minutes to look at a wide range of signals —  everything from video player signals about whether a video is currently playing to a user’s mouse movements to which browser tab is currently open — to determine whether the user is still engaged,” Upworthy posted on their blog.“The result is a fine-grained and unforgiving metric that tells us whether people are really engaged with our content or whether they’ve moved on to the next thing.”  Measuring the reach of visual contentThe picture becomes even more blurred when visual content and social sharing come into the picture. While sites can easily track who is sharing their posts on social media (a sure sign the audience is engaging with it in some manner), images can easily be dislodged from their original context, reposted and shared beyond the reach of traditional analytics programs. It’s therefore difficult to truly understand the full reach of any visual content on the Internet.Despite these challenges, marketers and analytics experts continue to come up with new metrics and new ways to contextualize data in order to glean new insights.What challenges have you faced when using analytics on your site? Related: Get Comfortable With Big Data in 3 Steps Register Now » This story originally appeared on Visual.ly 4 min read Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more

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