Decreasing International Cooperation in Anti-Drug Fight Concerns Peru

first_img Peru is concerned by the “growing decrease” in international cooperation in the fight against drugs and is negotiating with the United States and the European Union for greater aid in fulfillment of their responsibilities in combating that crime, the Peruvian anti-drug czar said on September 9. “There is a worrisome trend of decreasing external cooperation,” affirmed Ricardo Soberón, head of the National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (Comisión Nacional de Desarrollo y Vida sin Drogas), emphasizing that what is sought is for that cooperation to be “horizontal, open, and respectful, in order to confront a problem that transcends Peru’s possibilities.” He indicated that negotiations are currently underway with two U.S. agencies for aid in the amount of 52.5 million dollars annually, while cooperation from the countries of the European Union is expected to be 50.2 million dollars for the next three years. At a press conference, Soberón specified that the cocaine produced in Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia — the world’s largest producers of that drug — is worth 33 billion dollars on being sold in Europe and 37 billion dollars on being sold in the United States, according to United Nations figures. “If those amounts are compared to what we receive in international cooperation, we realize that there’s an enormous difference, which implies non-fulfillment of the principle of shared responsibility on the part of the international community.” For that reason, he noted that President Ollanta Humala has called for an anti-drug summit in the first half of next year, with consuming countries and producing countries participating. “The U.S. market has stabilized, but it still represents 36 percent of global consumption, while there’s a substantial increase in consumption in Western Europe,” he noted. In the case of Peru, he said that drug production is calculated to be over 300 tons a year, of which around 20 tons is seized, implying that drug traffickers do between 2.5 billion and 3 billion dollars of business in the country each year. Peru will dedicate between 43 million and 45 million dollars of its resources to the fight against drugs in 2012, for interdiction, coca eradication, rural development, and prevention. By Dialogo September 13, 2011last_img read more

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5 ways to make a better plan for your money in 2016

first_img 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr From professional football player to speaker and financial coach, Chris Hogan has been a staple among personal finance experts. The money guru once worked as vice president of a mortgage company and later turned to helping people successfully manage their money. As a finalist in the 2015 GOBankingRates “Best Money Expert” competition held in collaboration with Ally Bank, Chris Hogan offers this money tip for 2016:“The best thing you can do for your finances is to create a plan. Think about what your financial goals are and create a plan to reach those goals. The necessity of a plan sounds simple, but it is the one thing that many people overlook when it comes to their money. And a dream without a plan is simply a wish.”Follow these five steps to apply Hogan’s 2016 money tip to your life. From identifying key financial goals to paying down low balance debts, you can get your finances on track.1. Identify Your Financial GoalsHogan said it best: Without a plan, your goals are a pipe dream. In 2016, consider what you would like to do for the next few years, and how you can manage your finances to make your dreams come true. Whether you’re saving for a house or car, as soon as you start mapping out what’s in store for the new year, you’ll see how much money you’ll need to save and what other steps you’ll need to take to reach those goals. continue reading »last_img read more

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Is the compliance burden driving your credit union to consider a merger?

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr If you’re a leader in your credit union, compliance is certainly not a new issue. The compliance burden of today’s market is significant and costly; nor will it go away any time soon. If you feel like you once spent 80 percent of your time on member issues, and now you spend 80 percent of your time on compliance, you are not alone.Although the credit union compliance burden is a major line item for each institution’s expenditures, smaller organizations are feeling the impacts of today’s regulations to a far greater—and sometimes harmful—extent than their larger brethren. Credit union compliance has driven several small institutions to consider teaming up for the greater good of the bottom line. If this includes you, here are some things to think about:Opportunity CostsAlthough spending ample amounts of time on regulatory compliance is not ideal, it’s simply a cost of doing business. That said, regulations and laws don’t discriminate or adjust for organizations depending on their size. If you’re operating a small credit union with few internal resources to assist with the regulatory oversight, you’re likely feeling the effects of the regulations on a far greater scale than your larger credit union counterparts. continue reading »last_img read more

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