Covid-19 knows no borders – McCallion

first_img Twitter Pinterest Covid-19 knows no borders – McCallion Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+ WhatsApp WhatsApp AudioHomepage BannerNews Harps come back to win in Waterford Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Previous articleGovernment urged to ‘look after people left behind in lockdown’Next articleMan arrested under Terrorism Act in Derry today News Highland center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR DL Debate – 24/05/21 Facebook Google+ Facebook There’s concern that cross-border workers could be potentially ‘at risk’ over a lack of communication between health services. It’s claimed that a more collaborative approach is needed between HSE and HSC in terms of contact tracing when cross-border workers test positive for Covid-19.Senator Elisha McCallion has written to the Health Minister Stephen Donnelly for clarity on the issue.Speaking in the Seanad today, Senator McCallion says that the virus does not recognise borders, therefore the strategy must be the suppression of the virus in the workplace on an all-island basis:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/mcall1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 By News Highland – September 18, 2020 Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR cliniclast_img read more

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A church of words

first_imgCall him a preacher, a soothsayer, a shaman, a poet. It’s the last that Jericho Brown goes by, but it takes all of the above to write lines like “The loneliest people have the earth to love and not one friend their own age” (from “Odd Jobs”).Brown, the Radcliffe Institute’s 2009-10 American Fellow, read Wednesday (April 21) inside the Radcliffe Gymnasium from “The New Testament,” his newest collection of poems.Born to a New Orleans churchgoing family, Brown read with the breathless urgency of a reverend to a hoard of sinners. Before launching into “Another Elegy,” his opening poem, Brown’s command over the audience was palpable. Lapsing into a silence so long it might otherwise be deemed uncomfortable, Brown could’ve predicted the world’s end and no one would’ve budged.Instead he spoke: “Expect death in all our poems. Men die. Death is not a metaphor. It stands for nothing and represents itself. … It enters whether or not your house is dirty. Whether or not your body is clean.”In “The New Testament,” Brown mashes up religion, mixing identity, sexuality, violence, race, death, and more death. “The Bible is a text to go back to,” said Brown, “just like ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’ is a text to go back to.”Both texts are soaked with death; yet as bleak as Brown’s poems can sometimes be, his performance of them — though never shy in intensity — is a catharsis.“I was raised in a church where part of growing up was about getting in front of people and doing what we saw our pastor doing every Sunday,” he recalled. “You have to be able to give over to an audience for them to enjoy it. So I think that’s ingrained in me, no matter what I’m doing.”In “Another Elegy,” a different poem with the same title, Brown read: “Every night, / I take a pill. Miss one, and I’m gone. / Miss two, and we’re through. Hotels / Bore me, unless I get a mountain view, / A room in which my cell won’t work, / And there’s nothing to do but see / The sun go down into the ground / That cradles us as any coffin can.”“I think of every poem as its own character, so I do my best to embody that character,” said Brown, who won the prestigious Whiting Award while at Radcliffe. The coveted honor, which carries a $50,000 prize, is given to writers in the early stages of their careers who show extraordinary talent and promise. Brown is author of the book “Please” (New Issues, 2008), and teaches at the University of San Diego.In “To Be Seen,” Brown read: “You will forgive me if I carry the tone of a preacher, / Surely, you understand, a man in the midst of dying / Must have a point, which is not to say that I am dying / Exactly.”Last year, Brown had a life-changing revelation: “I became very afraid that I was going to die. For the first time in my life, I was thinking, ‘Oh, I might die?’ It had never crossed my mind before. It’s that feeling you have when you almost hit a car, that shaking inside, and I was having that feeling all day, every day, that shaking inside.”Brown handled those thoughts by writing. “I felt like I could deal with that feeling if I wrote about that feeling,” he said.“To Be Seen” takes its title from a doctor’s appointment (“the doctor will see you now”), and in the poem Brown confronts disease, mortality, the doctor he does not trust:My doctor, for instance, insists on the metaphor of war;It’s always the virus that attacks and the cells that fight orDie fighting.  I even remember him saying the word siegeWhen another rash returned.  Here I am dyingWhile he makes a battle of my body — anything to be seenWhen all he really means is to grab me by the chinAnd, like God the Father, say through clenched teeth,Look at me when I’m talking to you.  Your healing isNot in my hands, though I touch as if to make you whole.Noting the lack of joy in his poems, Brown called himself an elegiac poet, but admitted he is really a happy person. “Maybe the joy hasn’t gotten into my writing just yet,” he said. “But it will.”last_img read more

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Deer Park Strip Club Shooting Kills Man

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 20-year-old Wyandanch man was shot and killed outside of a Deer Park strip club over the weekend, Suffolk County police said.Officers responded to a 911 call reporting a shooting in the parking lot of Illusions Gentleman’s Club on Saxwood Street, where they found Ryan Aguilar with a gunshot wound at 3:36 a.m. Saturday, police said.The victim was taken to Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, where he was pronounced dead.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to call Homicide Squad detectives at 631-852-6392 or call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS.last_img read more

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