District Commissioner Outraged over Lawlessness in Tappita

first_imgThe Administrative District Commissioner of Doe District located within the Tappita Statutory District, Mr. Samuel Wehyee is outraged over the continued lawlessness within his district.Speaking to the Daily Observer on Monday, he said the acts of lawlessness within his district are posing serious threats to security for both the local authority and the citizens in general.Mr. Wehyee is infuriated over the recent murder of a 25yr old man who was stabbed to death in Dounpa town by his friend identified as Chris Slamiah on January 30th at the football field.Commissioner Wehyee said that on the night of 28th January, the perpetrator, Chris Slamiah and the victim, Dadah Vaye got into a confrontation during a wake keeping and during the argument Dada bit the perpetrator Chris on his face.He narrated that after the confrontation, the matter was taken to the Township Commissioner who sent the wounded person to a clinic for treatment pending an investigation.Commissioner Wehyee explained that while the case was pending until Chris recovered from the bite, Chris took a kitchen knife to the football field where Dadah was playing on Friday January 30th and stabbed Dadah four times in the chest, neck and stomach killing him instantly in retaliation for biting him. “After stabbing his friend to death, he fled into the bushes and was later arrested in a nearby town and taken to the police station in Saclapea,” said the Commissioner.Mr. Wehyee added that immediately after the boy died, his parent went after the parent of the perpetrator to take revenge on any of the family members.He maintained that, during the tension, a house belonging to the perpetrator’s family was broken down and their rice kitchen in their village set ablaze.“In the process, 14 members of the perpetrator’s family fled into the bushes for several days before reporting themselves to authorities in another town which is located far from where the incident occurred.Commissioner Wehyee’s frustration is apparently due to the escalation of killings with impunity in the area.  Those who were involved in killing a man in Zua Town in late November were reportedly released from prison in Sanniquellie.It can be recalled that late last year, a man was tortured to death in Zua Town by a country devil and its followers after the man allegedly broke the town’s rule.Dounpa, where the boy was stabbed to death has a common boundry with Zua Town where the 58 year old man was tortured to death last year.The commissioner explained that the five persons arrested in connection with the torture and killing of the 58 year old man last year were recently seen going about their normal activities after being freed from Sanniquellie jail.He said the wave of lawlessness and killings in the district is causing fear among the citizens and restricting their freedom of movement.“We are afraid with this kind of lawlessness in the district because we do not have any security to accompanying us to the crime scene. There are only nine police officers in a large district like Tappita which comprises four administrative districts including Gbi – Doru. Kparblee, Doe and Boe and Quellah,” he said.“Even as we speak, our local office staffs including the messengers, clerk and other officers, are not on payroll and we cannot press on them,” he concluded.A police source at the Nimba Police Detachment has confirmed the stabbing incident and said that the perpetrator had been transferred to a local police station and is undergoing investigation. But unconfirmed reports reaching this paper said that the perpetrator was severely beaten by mobs upon his arrest.Dounpa and Zua Town in early 2008 were at loggerheads in land disputes during which several citizens were wounded in single barrel gun fights.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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‘Excited’ Williams joins Chelsea Ladies

first_imgEngland international Rachel Williams says she cannot wait for the season to start after agreeing a move to Chelsea Ladies. Williams, signed from Birmingham City Ladies, will form part of a mouthwatering attack that includes fellow England international Eniola Aluko and Fifa Women’s Player of the Year nominee Yuki Ogimi.Despite being only 25, Williams has enjoyed a successful career to date, representing England on 10 occasions, as well as forming part of Hope Powell’s Team GB squad at last year’s Olympics.Domestically, Williams was the FA WSL’s top scorer with 14 goals in 14 matches and Players’ Player of the Year in 2011, while she was twice a runner-up in the league with Birmingham.And Williams, who began her career at hometown club Leicester City Women, is targeting a successful campaign in her new surroundings under manager Emma Hayes.She said: “I’m really excited and have been ever since I met up with [assistant manager] Paul Green and Emma and they told me what they are determined to do here.Williams is set to link up with Ogimi“They are determined to be competitive next year and I am really looking forward to it.“I came and met Paul and Emma here and was impressed with what I saw.“The set-up behind the scenes is impressive as are the staff, players and training facilities – it really is top class and all I want to do now is crack on and play football.“It’s definitely an exciting move. I’ve always played with my heart on my sleeve and I will do the same here at Chelsea and hopefully it will bring success.“The groundwork is there and they are strengthening for next year and hopefully I can come in and work alongside Yuki and Eni or maybe just off Yuki up front, which I feel will be really good for me and the club and I look forward to it.“With Yuki being nominated as world player I know there will be a lot to learn but there is also Eni who I know from England and I look forward to working with her and learning from her both at club and international level.“It’s an exciting season for sure and hopefully we can win something.”Williams’ international career is yet to hit the heights many expect it will do in the future, with Powell omitting her from the Euro 2009 squad and the World Cup two years later.Powell has since vacated her position with the national team ,with Brent Hills the current caretaker manager, and Williams is confident her move to Chelsea Ladies will prove the catalyst her England career needs.“My international career has come to a bit of a stop but I know this is the right club to get me back in the window for England,” she added.“I am just going to work hard and ensure whoever the next England manager will be I catch their eye and they think ‘you know what, we need her in the England team’.” See also:Chelsea Ladies sign Brazilian midfield starChelsea Ladies sign Japan World Cup starChelsea Ladies star sees bright future for women’s football in EnglandChelsea Ladies star shortlisted by FifaChelsea Ladies to head to Japan for Women’s Club ChampionshipChelsea Ladies star relishing Japan tripChelsea Ladies sign another England starChelsea Ladies sign duo from 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Will the surging A’s be buyers? If so, here are their likely trade partners

first_imgThe American League is riddled with postseason contenders. The A’s are in a tight sprint for two available Wild Card spots with at least four other teams — the Tampa Bay Rays, Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians and Texas Rangers.But a quick pitstop looms: the trade deadline. And the A’s will surely be looking primarily at the starting pitching and bullpen options.What’s to give up? Oakland has a bit of an infielder glut in their farm. Jorge Mateo and Franklin Barreto crowd a middle infield …last_img read more

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Ohio’s Crop Progress — October 10, 2017

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Rain brought much needed relief to dry areas but brought harvest to a standstill, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 4.9 days available for fieldwork for the week ending October 8, 2017. Rains stopped most field activity but soils were so dry it was absorbed with little or no runoff or standing water. Harvest was progressing well for soybeans and corn but at a slow pace. Rain was favorable to winter wheat emergence and some planting was done when the weather permitted. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 20 percent, and soybean moisture was at 11 percent. The wet weather was very welcomed and improved soil and pasture conditions.Read the full report herelast_img read more

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A look at acid rain and the farm phosphorus conundrum with water quality

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Farmers understand that Lake Erie turns green in the summer and that part of the blame is rightfully being directed at agriculture due to issues related to nutrient management, specifically phosphorus. What is less understood is why this is happening.In a time period where on-farm phosphorus application levels have decreased substantially and recommended conservation practices have increased in the agricultural landscape, the troubling harmful algal blooms again started showing up in the Western Basin of Lake Erie after many thought the water quality issues had been corrected decades earlier.Even more confusing are the smaller lakes in more remote parts of the state and country where algal blooms are showing up in lakes surrounded with little to no agriculture to blame on the issue. There are numerous theories as to why this could be happening. One of them was a topic in a study published in the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation last summer: “A possible trade-off between clean air and clean water.”Douglas R. Smith with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory in Texas was the lead author. The study looked at possible connections between the phosphorus mobility in the soil and the well-documented change in the pH of rainfall since the implementation of the amendments to the Clean Air Act in the early 90s to address concerns with acid rain.“I think it is certainly a fascinating topic. There have been quite a few publications on the potential causes of the Lake Erie issue,” Smith said. “I do not think it is possible for acid rain recovery to be solely responsible for the eutrophication issues. I have been a co-author on several papers on the issue, and think it is the culmination of many factors. I cannot say for sure that rain chemistry is one of the contributors, but I cannot rule it out either. If it is not a contributor, it is certainly an interesting coincidence. I hope there will be an additional paper coming out in the next year or so on this issue.”For some, the publication of the article made sense in helping to explain why the harmful algal blooms are showing up, particularly in non-agricultural areas. Agronomist Joe Nester, owner of Nester Ag, LLC in Williams County, has been talking about this possibility for several years.“That study should open the door for more discussion and research on it. I’ve been working with nutrient management for 40 plus years, most of it in the Western Lake Erie Basin. When we started having problems with phosphorus loading, even with all of the improvements I have seen over that 40-year period, I struggled with how we were going backwards. I noticed the huge drop in sulfur in the soil like everyone else had. When the soils get low in pH we tie up phosphorus and have a tough time getting it in the plant. It just makes sense to me,” Nester said. “In my opinion, the change in the pH of the rainfall from about 4.2 to roughly 6.2 today — that is a 100-fold change in acidity —is liberating P that used to be tied up in the soil. That is a pretty drastic change in soil chemistry in my opinion. When the Clean Air Act amendments were passed, pH levels of the rain started to rise. By the end of the 20-year implementation period for that you can see a real jump. The biggest increase was in 2008 and that is the first year Lake Erie turned green.”In addition, Nester is finding less need for phosphorus applications in many fields.“In the last 10 years I don’t think I’ve seen phosphorus deficiencies anywhere, even in some zones we manage where we should be showing a P deficiency and we aren’t,” he said. “The mileage that we are getting from P applications led me to believe it even more. As agronomists we have cut back on the phosphorus as opposed to what we put on 10 or 15 years ago and we are raising better crops. I am convinced that there is something else happening in the soil.”So the bad news, Nester said, is that phosphorus seems to be more soluble and mobile in the soil which makes it easier to lose, but that also could be the good news for agriculture because it means potentially lower nutrient costs.“For agriculture that really is good news but we have to learn the techniques and management systems to keep it within the field boundaries instead of moving with the water. We mange tens of thousands of acres of nutrients a year and I’m convinced that P is a more mobile unit than it used to be. A farmer should really be evaluating the right rate by soil type and then try to draw down phosphorus levels to see when it starts reducing yield. I haven’t seen it and frankly I have been surprised on some 15 to 20 ppm soil tests with nothing applied that can still produce some pretty awesome yields of corn and soybeans,” Nester said. “We did some of our own work using water as an extractant for comparison and each time the higher pH water extractant showed more soluble P than the lower pH water extractant. I definitely think there is something there. I don’t know what else would explain it. When you talk with farmers about this being a real possibility the light bulb pops on and they say, ‘Well we can work with that.’ Otherwise we see them say, ‘We spent tens of thousands of dollars on technology, we’ve reduced P rates, increased yields, employed cover crops and minimum-till, and we’re going backwards? It is not me.’ But if the environment has changed, it makes sense.”Though it does make sense to some agronomists, others are skeptical that the pH of the rainfall could influence the mobility of phosphorus in the soil so dramatically. Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension agronomist, thinks the increased mobility of phosphorus has more to do with the 4Rs.“Phosphorus can be tied up by calcium at higher pH levels, but P can also be tied up by iron and aluminum at lower pH levels. As we have cut back on the acid we have in the rain, yes we have had a slight shift in the soil pH levels. Is that enough to really solve the problem or cause the problem with dissolved reactive phosphorus in Lake Erie? My guess is not,” Watters said. “We have a pool of calcium under us. It is our bedrock below us and we have basic pH levels on the western side of the state. In the eastern side of the state we have acid pH levels. We have plenty of calcium and we have plenty of aluminum and iron as well. So I don’t see gypsum, calcium, iron, or aluminum, or bringing back acid rain as the magic bullet to solve the problems for us. We’re going to have to work on best management practices as a group. That means incorporating phosphorus into the soil and not putting it on the surface.”Watters thinks the concentration of nutrients near the soil’s surface due to application practices and increased conservation tillage has much more impact on increasing dissolved reactive phosphorus loss.“We have bigger farms today and more minimum tillage. I recently asked 10 to 15 farmers and some Extension educators about tillage tools being used for incorporation of nutrients and what is their primary tillage tool. In some cases I was told that 50% of the acres were using vertical tillage for incorporating nutrients and also primary tillage. The lowest number I had for vertical tillage tools was 20%,” Watters said. “When you talk about vertical tillage, that may only be an inch or two deep or some stirring. You are not really incorporating nutrients that well and contributing to the stratification of nutrients in the top. Guys are also telling me they are going fast and that tells me they are not incorporating nutrients all that well. We have to change some things. We need to rethink why we are using those tools — those are not for incorporating fertilizer. I think farm size and reduction of tillage is a big part of this.”The timing of nutrient application is also a significant contributor to the problem, Watters said.“I talked recently with a fairly average farmer in Ohio with 1,500 or 1,600 acres. When he pulls out of the field harvesting soybeans he calls his co-op to come spread fertilizer in his fields. He doesn’t know when the fertilizer goes on and he’s not going to do any tillage until the next spring immediately before planting. He stirs it up and then in a week or so later plants corn. I am seeing more of that. And if they are doing tillage, it is vertical tillage,” Watters said. “That risk exposure from the time of application until the spring tillage is when there is the potential for the phosphorus to go away. I feel more confident in this kind of concern than the lack of acid rain.”The article “A possible trade-off between clean air and clean water” was published in the July/August Issue of The Journal of Soil and Water Conservation and is available online.last_img read more

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Four First Nations to create Wanska Energy Alliance

first_imgAPTN National NewsFour First Nations in Alberta and Saskatchewan are taking steps towards creating a new First Nation energy alliance.The Onion Lake Cree Nation, near the Alberta border in Saskatchewan, is banding together with the Driftpile, Sucker Creek, and Ermineskin First Nations in Alberta to form the Wanska Energy Alliance.APTN National News reporter Larissa Burnouf traveled to the Onion Lake Cree Nation, and has the story.last_img

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NTSB El Faro probe highlights maritime safety issues

first_imgWhile fateful decisions made by the captain of the doomed freighter El Faro were instrumental in the ship’s sinking, federal investigators spread plenty of blame around and highlighted multiple safety issues in the maritime industry that contributed to its demise.It was a confluence of factors that contributed to the sinking of the El Faro in the fury of Hurricane Joaquin on Oct. 1, 2015, which killed all 33 people on board, the National Transportation Safety Board announced. The report concluded a 2-year investigation into the worst U.S. maritime disaster in modern history.Among its findings the NTSB cited Tuesday the El Faro captain’s unwillingness to listen to his crew’s suggestions to change course from the path of a raging hurricane; a weak corporate safety culture that left crewmembers ill-prepared to deal with heavy weather. It also blamed an old ship with outdated lifeboats, open to the elements and a vessel inspection system that allowed older ships in poor condition to continue operating.The board issued 53 safety recommendations, which investigators hope will be adopted by the industry, maritime safety inspectors and weather forecasters to make the seas safer for future generations.The El Faro, which means “lighthouse” in Spanish, sank between Jacksonville, Florida, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, after losing engine power in the Category 3 storm. The NTSB retrieved the ship’s voyage data recorder, or “black box,” from the sea floor near the Bahamas, 15,000-feet (4,570 metres) under the surface. The device held 26 hours of data, including audio of conversations on the ship’s bridge as the frantic crew struggled to save the ship and themselves.Larry Brennan, a maritime law professor at Fordham Law School and retired U.S. Navy captain, said the NTSB’s meeting highlighted major safety problems in the entire shipping industry, including the Coast Guard and so-called “classification societies” like the American Bureau of Shipping, or ABS, that are in charge of inspecting vessels for safety.“El Faro was a worn, aged ship which succumbed to heavy weather in large part because of multiple unseaworthy conditions, poor leadership and bad decisions by the captain, ABS, the owners as well as inadequate surveys and inspections by the U.S. Coast Guard,” Brennan said.While the board found no fault with El Faro Capt. Michael Davidson’s decision to leave port in Jacksonville, they did blame his reliance on an emailed weather forecasting system that contained hours-old data, rather than online updates from the National Hurricane Center. Investigators believe, based on his decisions and recorded comments, that he wasn’t aware of the delay in the data and that instead of skirting the storm, he sent the El Faro on a collision course with the hurricane.“Although up-to-date weather information was available on the ship, the El Faro captain did not use the most current weather information for decision-making,” NTSB investigator Mike Kucharski said at the meeting, held in Washington, D.C.The board also criticized the “weak safety culture” of ship owner TOTE Maritime, Inc., including the lack of employee training for dealing with heavy weather situations and flooding. A hatch had been left open, allowing water from the roiling sea to flood an interior hold; this led to the ship tilting, disrupting the flow of oil to the engines. Once the freighter lost engine power, it was at the mercy of battering swells.In a statement, TOTE said it will study the NTSB and Coast Guard investigative reports thoroughly. “We as a company intend to learn everything possible from this accident and the resulting investigations to prevent anything similar from occurring in the future,” Darrell Wilson, a company spokesman, said.El Faro’s wind gauge, called an anemometer, was broken and the 40-year-old freighter’s open-top lifeboats would not have protected the crew, even if they had been able to launch them. The El Faro was legally allowed to carry lifeboats that expose people to the elements — just like the lifeboats on the Titanic and the Lusitania — due to safety-rule exemptions for older ships.Whether the crew could have survived Joaquin’s punishing winds and high seas had the El Faro been equipped with the closed-top lifeboats used by newer ships is unknown, but NTSB safety investigator Jon Furukawa said it could have helped crewmembers fighting for their lives.“We believe that would’ve been the best method of departing the vessel under these conditions. It is still challenging, and we don’t know if they would’ve survived,” Furukawa said.The board is not only recommending closed-top boats for all merchant ships, but also that the entire industry require crewmembers to carry personal locator beacons to better locate them during marine emergencies.The El Faro had an older emergency position-indicating radio beacon, or EPIRB, which did not transmit global position system co-ordinates, and that made locating the ship more difficult for search-and-rescue crews. Given the heavy weather, rescuers probably couldn’t have reached the ship any sooner, but the board believes the new requirement would help in future sea accidents.“I hope that this tragedy at sea can serve as a lighthouse to guide the safety of marine transportation,” said Robert Sumwalt, the board’s chairman.___Follow Jason Dearen on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/JHDearenlast_img read more

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Ohio State womens soccer advances to 2nd round in doubleovertime victory over

OSU sophomore forward Sammy Edwards (19) during a game against Minnesota on Sept. 17 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Sam Harris / For The LanternOhio State women’s soccer forward Sammy Edwards had been searching for her chance all night at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in the first round of the NCAA tournament. The sophomore came out firing on Saturday night against the Butler Bulldogs, but her game-high three first-half shot attempts all came up short.Frustration was building up, but Edwards would finally get her shot at redemption, even if it came after nearly 107 minutes of playing time. In the second overtime, Edwards pushed the frustration to the back of her mind and the net, sending her team to the second round with a goal in the 107th minute for the 2-1 victory.“As (the players’) frustration was going up, they had to get their communication higher and just continue to press and believe that the more opportunities we create, one of them has got to fall,” OSU coach Lori Walker said.OSU (12-6-3) immediately went on the offensive as soon as the game commenced, eager for a postseason victory. Buckeye junior forward Lindsey Agnew attempted the team’s first shot in the 13th minute off of a Nichelle Prince corner kick. Agnew’s shot was blocked, but Edwards countered with an attempt from 12 yards which sailed just over the top of the goalpost.“To have that kind of possession and to have the opportunities we did in the first half and then not feel like we converted, it’s very easy to fall into a level of frustration,” Walker said.The Buckeyes contained the game to Butler’s (16-7-1) side of the field for a majority of the first half. Prince continued to create shots on goal with her heads-up crosses to her forward counterparts. Edwards also had another early opportunity at breaking the deadlock, but she missed over the top on a volley from eight yards out.It was the relentless three-headed attack consisting of Prince, Agnew and Edwards that continually pushed the Buckeyes downfield. The selfish style of play by Prince, who led the Buckeyes with 77 shot attempts entering the tournament, kept the home team on track despite the threat of frustration building up.Both the Buckeyes and the Bulldogs had opportunities to enter halftime with a lead. Strikes on goal by OSU senior midfielder Michela Paradiso at the 35th minute and Butler sophomore defender Maria Collica at the 37th minute nearly changed the course of the game. The Buckeyes took an 8-5 shot lead into the half, although Butler held a slight 2-1 edge with shots on goal.“I was just beating myself up over the misses in the first half, but I didn’t let it get to my head too much,” Edwards said.Although OSU seemed in control throughout the first 45 minutes of play, Butler opened the half with the same aggression that the Buckeyes began the contest with. The OSU women did not fold, answering with a few subsequent trips downfield that nearly resulted in scores.Prince decided to get in on the assertive Buckeye action after playing the distributor role in the first half, attempting shots from six and eight yards out at the 52nd and 62nd minute marks, respectively. However, OSU continued to be inches away from moving the scoreboard.It was not until redshirt junior defender Morgan Wolcott, who had entered Saturday’s game having taken just two shots on goal for the season, recorded possibly the most important goal of her career. Wolcott broke the nil-nil game in the 86th minute with a tap that pushed the ball just inside the right post.“To get a goal that helps us advance further in the NCAAs is big time,” Wolcott said.Minutes later, the energy was almost completely taken out of the Buckeye women. Seconds away from moving on to the second round, Butler senior midfielder Sophia Maccagnone squeezed a free kick just past OSU redshirt junior goalie Jillian McVicker inside the right post.“It’s just similar to our entire season,” Maccagnone said. “We don’t want to stop fighting.”Thinking that they were about to capture the most important victory of the season, the Buckeyes would need to come together on the field and in their minds to prevent Butler from stealing a win.“We kind of all just took a deep breath and reengaged in what we had to do,” Edwards said. “We have been through so much adversity, so just throwing that at us is just another thing we can handle.”That opportunity came in the second overtime when Edwards followed up a miss at the 103rd minute with the game-winner with less than four minutes to go in the final extra period.“I’m very proud of my team and the energy they found in overtime to find a way to win,” Walker said. “We’ve certainly been in overtime many times this year, and I think that gave us a little confidence to get the job done.”The Buckeyes are next scheduled to play the fourth-seeded Virginia Tech Hokies (15-3-2) in the second round of the NCAA tournament on Friday at 3 p.m. in State College, Pennsylvania. read more

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Mens Basketball Ohio State moves up to No 13 in AP Top

Ohio State senior forward Jae’Sean Tate (1) drives the lane in the second half of the game against Maryland on Jan. 11 in the Schottenstein Center. Dakich made three of four three point attempts in the first half aiding Ohio State to a 91-69 win. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorOhio State continued to ascend up the Associated Press Top 25 Poll, moving from No. 22 to No. 13 Monday. The Buckeyes have not been ranked this high in the AP poll since Dec. 15, 2014, when they were the No. 12 team in the nation.Ohio State is one of four Big Ten teams ranked, joining No. 3 Purdue, No. 6 Michigan State and No. 25 Michigan.Head coach Chris Holtmann extended his unbeaten streak to start conference play to eight games, leading his team to wins versus Northwestern and Minnesota, the former on the road and the latter at a neutral site. Ohio State’s win against Minnesota was the team’s 17th victory this season, matching the total from all of last season. Overall, the Buckeyes are 17-4.With the 8-0 record in the conference, Holtmann has the longest undefeated start in a Big Ten coach’s first season since Sam Barry began his Iowa coaching career with an 11-0 start in 1923. The record is Wisconsin’s Walter Meanwell, who went 12-0 to begin Big Ten play in 1912.The Buckeyes will hope to begin Holtmann’s tenure 9-0 when they host Nebraska at 8 p.m. Monday at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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