The QPR v Stoke City quiz

first_imgStoke City visit Loftus Road this weekend for a vital match for QPR. Test your knowledge of the history between the clubs by seeing how many of these five questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-6]Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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Things to know: Sharks center is getting his first ‘big test’

first_imgNASHVILLE, Tenn. — No one downplayed or sidestepped the truth Tuesday morning: the Sharks are about to receive their first big test of the season.After controlling the play in eight straight games, the Sharks (4-3-1) are about to find out if their game holds up against the reigning President’s Trophy winners. The Nashville Predators (7-1) are entering Tuesday’s game in Music City holding the most points in the NHL (14) and the league’s best goals-against average (1.88).The Sharks, who rank …last_img read more

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Mars Has Global Warming: Manufacturers At Fault?

first_imgMars appears to be coming out of an ice age and into an era of global warming, reports Space.Com.  Whether the Kyoto treaty can be extended to the red planet remains to be seen.  Environmentalists are not sure if human influence is to blame; the closest thing to an SUV on Mars is the leftover Pathfinder Rover.OK, OK, we won’t press the point.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img

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Cost of Renewable Energy Continues to Fall

first_imgWhy We Still Need to Discuss Grid DefectionOn-Site Storage Is the Great EqualizerRethinking the Grid Green Building in the Cheap Energy EraSolar Picture Is Brighter Than It Appears Strong interest in Saudi ArabiaThe Saudis are the world’s largest exporter of oil, but by the end of the year the government will invest as much as $7 billion to develop solar and wind energy, The New York Times said. Renewables currently make up a minuscule amount of the energy used in the country, but the government officials hope solar and wind could make up 10% of the country’s energy mix by 2024.Last June the country burned an average of 680,000 barrels of oil per day to run the air conditioners that make its climate habitable. But Saudi Arabia has plenty of oil, so why would it care about developing solar and wind?Any oil that it burns at home is oil it can’t sell abroad, and that would have amounted to some $47 million a day last summer. So renewable sources of energy is one way of making the government’s bottom line look better. Developing a robust renewables industry also would help the government create new jobs for young people in an economic sector that essentially doesn’t exist now.The solar project announced this week will be built in Sakaka, in the northern part of the country, at a wholesale price of between 2 cents and 3 cents per kWh, The Times said. That’s below the cost of electricity generated by fossil-fuel power stations. In an energy auction in Mexico last fall, the Italian energy conglomerate ENEL was reported to have submitted the lowest ever bid for supplying solar electricity — just $17.70 per megawatt hour, or 1.77 cents per kilowatt hour. It turns out the bid actually was for wind-generated power, not solar, but the initial reporting error didn’t change the underlying fact: the cost of both wind and solar electricity is sinking fast.In reporting on the energy auctions, Electrek said the record low bid was among four from ENEL totaling 682 megawatts of electricity. The price was slightly lower than the 1.79-cents per kWh recorded in Saudi Arabia last October, leading the Electrek writer to predict prices of 1 cent per kWh by next year, if not sooner.In Colorado, Xcel Energy received bids from potential suppliers of wind and solar power that will allow it to build and operate new plants for less than it would cost to keep its coal-burning power plants on line, according to an op-ed piece published in The New York Times this week.Even Saudi Arabia, the biggest oil producer in the world, is diving into renewables with immediate plans for a $300 million solar farm capable of powering as many as 200,000 homes. A much bigger campaign to develop renewables is in the making. In Colorado, coal is on the ropesIn Colorado, Xcel Energy has proposed closing two of its coal-fired power plants and replacing them with a mix of solar, wind, and natural gas, according to The Denver Post. At a public hearing last month, some speakers suggested that projected savings look so good that it makes sense for the utility to close all of its Colorado coal plants.Last year, the utility said it would need 450 megawatts of additional power and solicited bids from potential providers. The median price for wind-only bids was 1.8 cents a kWh; the median price for solar was 2.95 cents. Those prices are very low, but The Post said the most surprising thing was that wind with battery storage was now cheaper than coal power generation, and solar plus storage was cheaper than about 75% of Colorado’s coal generation.The median price for solar with storage was 3.6 cents per kWh, and wind with storage was 2.1 cents per kWh.“As far as we know, these are the lowest renewables plus storage bids in the U.S. to date,” Carbon Tracker senior utilities and power analyst Matt Gray told the newspaper then. “The previously lowest known solar plus storage bid price was $45/MWh [4.5 cents per kWh] in Arizona in May 2017.”Xcel had agreed last year to close the two coal plants as long as the move would save ratepayers money. Supporters said savings could reach $175 million — but that was before the “shockingly low” bids for renewable energy were reported last month.Critics of the plan say it’s foolhardy to close the two coal plants in Pueblo because they could operate for many more years. Renewable energy bids, however, have been so low that advocates think that a complete transition away from coal has more promise.Anita Seitz, a Westminster City Council member who testified at last month’s hearing, put it this way, according to The Post: “We feel the proposal to close old and inefficient coal plants more quickly and expand renewables in Colorado just makes sense. Shifting from coal to renewable energy creates jobs, saves money on everyone’s electric bills and helps clean up our air.”The The New York Times op-ed piece notes that low bids received by Xcel benefit from federal subsidies that eventually will be phased out. But even when they’re gone, wind and utility-scale solar projects will still be competitive with fossil-fuel plants in much of the country. Xcel Energy expects more than half of the electricity it sells in its eight-state service area will come from renewable sources by the mid 2020s.Nationally, the U.S. Energy Information Administration projected this week that renewable energy would more than double between 2017 and 2050 with an average annual growth rate of 2.8%, Utility Dive said.center_img Mexico’s fall power auctionThe initial press release from the Centro Nacional de Control de Energía last November cited the price for the record low bid, but not the source of power. That led to the original reporting mistake. But the details of the auction showed bid prices on more than a dozen wind and solar projects all hovering in the 2 cents-per-kWh range. While ENEL’S wind bids were the lowest of the lot, the average bid price on the 2.3 gigawatt total from both wind and solar was 2.05 cents per kWh.The projects are due to come on line in 2020.Worldwide, Electrek reported, solar prices have fallen from a record of 8.3 cents per kWh in 2013, to 5.84 cents in 2014, 4.97 cents in 2015, to a low of 2.42 cents per kWh in 2016. The bids were recorded in the U.S., the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia.Electrek noted at the time: “When the bids of 2.42¢/kWh hit last summer in 2016, much of the world suggested this was a bottom that was unique and couldn’t be passed without financial loss by the owners. When Saudi Arabia hit 1.79¢/kWh just a few weeks back — the narrative was that these prices were impossible elsewhere in the world because nowhere else in the world has Saudi Arabian oil money, sunlight, and control of all levels of government.”Then came Mexico, leading Electrek writer John Fitzgerald Weaver to predict a solar project would cross the 1-cent line in 2019. RELATED ARTICLES last_img read more

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Waistcoat sales up as Gareth Southgate sets trend at World Cup

first_imgFor years, football fans have been able to emulate the look of their idols with replica shirts, but this World Cup something different is happening: supporters are rushing to buy replicas of Gareth Southgate’s England waistcoat.Marks & Spencer, which has been the official suit supplier to the England team since 2007, said demand for waistcoats has risen 35% thanks to what they say is “the Gareth Southgate effect”.A full replica suit will set fans back £265. For an additional £25, fans can also pick up the red, white and blue tie that the England manager has been wearing during the tournament in Russia.The suits, which were unveiled to little fanfare back in May, are made of merino wool woven by the Alfred Brown mill in Yorkshire which also supplied the fabric for England’s 2014 World Cup suits, and for the Team GB uniform for the 2012 London Olympics.The trend for adopting more formal wear has been described as “reverse casualisation” – a reaction by a younger generation to their parents opting to wear casual leisurewear into their forties and fifties.The look may not be ideal, however, if the UK’s heatwave continues. Before England’s match with Panama in the heat of Nizhny Novgorod, Southgate joked in an interview that the light-blue shirt he wears on the touchline might be very revealing of just how much he was sweating.The popularity of Southgate’s waistcoat has sealed his reputation as one of the more stylish managers at the 2018 World Cup – although he has not escaped some fashion criticism. The bottom button on a waistcoat is traditionally left undone – apparently a style adopted in deference to rotund monarchs being unable to fasten them – but Southgate has been pictured with all his buttons done up.Despite that, Southgate has greatly improved on his previous highest profile fashion moment for England. The much-maligned “grey” away kit that England wore for the first time in a competitive match at their Euro96 semi-final has become synonymous with the image of a dismayed Southgate after he missed the crucial penalty kick against Germany. World Cup Share on WhatsApp Since you’re here… Gareth Southgate World Cup 2018 Men’s fashion England’s Gareth Southgate bows his head after missing from the spot during the Euro96 semifinal. Photograph: Lynne Sladky/AP Twitter The grey kit was designed by Umbro in that colour, specifically to go well with blue jeans. With the Southgate-inspired resurgence of the waistcoat, we wait to see what effect this trend may have on future England kit designs. … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Topics Share on Facebook Marks & Spencercenter_img Support The Guardian Pinterest Facebook Retail industry Reuse this content Share on Pinterest Share via Email Share on LinkedIn news England Share on Messenger Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Mahindra inaugurates its first automotive assembly plant in Sri Lanka

first_imgNew Delhi: Auto major Mahindra & Mahindra (M&M) on Saturday announced the inauguration of its local automotive assembly plant near Colombo, Sri Lanka . “Christened Mahindra Ideal Lanka Pvt. Ltd. this assembly plant is in collaboration with Ideal Motors of Sri Lanka. The assembly plant today rolled out its first product, the compact SUV, KUV100 and will roll out a slew of products over the next 3 years,” the company said in a statement. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal “Inauguration of this automotive assembly plant is a significant milestone for Mahindra’s foray into the Sri Lanka market. Sri Lanka is a key strategic market for us and we are now fully equipped to deliver products customised to local needs, on time,” Mahindra & Mahindra Managing Director Pawan Goenka said. Mahindra Ideal Lanka will assemble KUV100, with a production capacity of 5,000 units per annum. The company will localise four components — battery, tyres, seats and exhaust. The plant is expected to provide employment to 200 people directly and indirectly over the next two years, the statement added.last_img read more

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