Miracle ball lands as Wellington edge rivals in NPC Round 3

first_imgFriday Aug 23, 2019 Miracle ball lands as Wellington edge rivals in NPC Round 3 Wellington hung on to edge rivals Canterbury 23-22 in a thrilling Mitre 10 Cup game in the capital on Friday. After conceding a well-taken try midway through the half, the home side struck back just before the break after Vince Aso got on the end of a stunning flick pass by Pepesana Patafilo.ADVERTISEMENTPatafilo beat three before flinging a no look ball out the back door, which Aso gratefully gobbled up to allow him to beat another man then dive over in the corner.Canterbury scored two late tries after trailing 23-10, but came up short in the end. Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Great Tries Related Articles 26 WEEKS AGO Incredible athleticism for sensational try… 26 WEEKS AGO ARCHIVE: Suntory score amazing try to upset… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: All 12 tries from EPIC Bristol-Clermont… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Mike Tyson lectures Wilder on how to reclaim his glory against Fury

first_img Loading… “He’s feeling like he’s given up, ‘Oh my life is over, I made £72million so far but my life is over, oh lord, oh God, I wanna die’. “Grow up man, let’s just keep going through this until it’s really over.” Tyson Fury’s first name was inspired by Iron Mike and asked for his thoughts on his namesake, the elder Tyson added: “His father named him after me. “How the fact somebody can name someone after you and this guy becomes heavyweight champion. “He just wanted to name him to be a tough guy. “He’s really different, 6ft 10in but really elusive, he’s a boxer and, man, I just wish him the best of luck.” Earlier this week, Mike Tyson revealed his sick past of paying for orgies and having sex with “everybody”. Read Also:Tyson emotionally discusses how he wasted money And he also said his dream fight would have been against Floyd Mayweather Jr who he would have “fought dirty” against. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 The Gypsy King battered the Bronze Bomber in their February bout leaving many wondering why Wilder is bothering with fight number three. Speaking in an Instagram interview with rapper Fat Joe on Friday night, Tyson said: “Listen, he didn’t fight the same fight he fought the first fight. “The first fight he fought with confidence like he could win. The second fight he fought like he didn’t have no zest, no life in him. “I just don’t think he was the same fighter after the first fight. He couldn’t rise to that occasion again.” Pressed on whether he expected another walk over from Fury, Tyson replied: “No there’s always a chance. Everyone always has a chance. “It just depends on how much they want to give in to it. If he wants to dedicate his life to really winning this fight, anything can happen. “Wilder can still make a lot of money. He shouldn’t feel sad or discouraged. He should continue to go out there and fight with a lot of zest and confidence. Iron Mike Tyson has told Deontay Wilder how to beat Tyson Fury in their trilogy clash on October 3. Promoted ContentWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do This9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes20 Facts That’ll Change Your Perception Of “The Big Bang Theory”Here Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!Which Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?You’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeThe 18 Most Visited Cities In The WorldBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?last_img read more

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Wellington police notes: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

first_imgWellington Police notes for Tuesday, July 23, 2013:•7:21 a.m. Benjamin C. Ledesma, 20, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with disobeying a stop sign.•9 a.m. June Hearlson, 82, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with four counts of dogs at large.•9:54 a.m. Roy K. Branam, 33, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with disobeying a stop sign.•11:50 a.m. Officers took a report of found property of jewelry in the 1200 block N. Plum, Wellington.•11:52 a.m. Officers took a report of children in need of care in the 900 block W. Lincoln, Wellington.•12:30 p.m. April L. Grizzle, 34, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with dog at large.•12:40 p.m. Officers investigated a theft in the 400 block S. C, Wellington. •2:20 p.m. Officers investigated possession of marijuana by a known suspect in the 1100 block W. Harvey, Wellington.•2:20 p.m. Juvenlie male, 14, Wellington was referred to juvenile court for possession of marijuana.•2:42 p.m. Officers investigated burglary and theft in the 300 block W. Botkin, Wellington.•4:09 p.m. Christopher D. Pruett, 26, Wellington was arrested, charged and confined with domestic violence battery, criminal damage to property/domestic and obstruction of law enforcement.•4:20 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a ladder in the 1000 E. 16th, Wellington.•7 p.m. Officers investigated burglary, theft and criminal damage to property in the 900 block N. Woodlawn, Wellington.last_img read more

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Matriliny, border dispute may keep some Garos out of NRC

first_imgA sizeable number of people belonging to the Garo tribe are expected to be excluded from Assam’s updated National Register of Citizens to be published on August 31. The reasons: their matrilineal culture and Assam-Meghalaya boundary dispute.Most of matrilineal Garos inhabit the western half of Meghalaya. Some inhabit two districts of western Assam — Goalpara and Kamrup — in villages along the border with Meghalaya.“In our society, the men come to live with their in-laws after marriage. Some men from Meghalaya wedded into families in Assam could not get pre-1971 documents from the government or the nokmas [village chieftains]. They are expected to miss out on the NRC,” Thengsil Sangma, general secretary of the United Garo Autonomous Council Movement Committee (Assam), told The Hindu.March 24, 1971 is the cut-off date for considering a person’s citizenship in Assam.Mr. Sangma, based in Goalpara, said more than 60% of Garos living in Assam made it into the NRC published on July 30, 2018. Half of the remaining 40% comprise those who relocated or came to Assam from Meghalaya after marriage and have documents to get into the citizens’ list. Some of the Garos in Kamrup district to the east of Goalpara have faced a similar issue. But matrilineal complications have not played as big a part in their exclusion as has as an inter-State boundary dispute.Disputed areasThere are 12 disputed areas along the Assam-Meghalaya border, an outcome of Meghalaya challenging the Assam Reorganisation Act of 1971 after being carved out of Assam in 1972. One of the disputed areas is Langpih, which Meghalaya claims is in its West Khasi Hills district. Assam calls the village Lampi and claims it is in Kamrup district. “We don’t have the data yet, but we have estimated that at least 20% of the people in the border areas are likely to be excluded from the NRC for not submitting their legacy data in time. This should work out to 5,000 people,” Anindra Marak, the president of Garo National Council’s Kamrup district unit said.There are more than 130 Garo-inhabited villages and hamlets in Kamrup district. Most of these are within 5 km from the Assam-Meghalaya border.Some members of the community, Mr. Marak said, did not apply for the NRC because of their belief that they belong to Meghalaya and not Assam. Many Garos resent being left out of Meghalaya at the time of the creation of the State because of lack of development and alleged neglect by the local authorities in Assam.last_img read more

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Gundappa Vishwanath: A profile of the prolific batsman

first_imgVishwanath in action aganist the English attack: ‘Cricket is a funny game’The little master of Indian cricket, Gundappa Vishwanath made a remarkable comeback last month after almost slipping from the pinnacle of fame into a has been.After a bad patch lasting nearly two years, the five-foot-four-and-a-half-inch vice-captain of the Indian,Vishwanath in action aganist the English attack: ‘Cricket is a funny game’The little master of Indian cricket, Gundappa Vishwanath made a remarkable comeback last month after almost slipping from the pinnacle of fame into a has been.After a bad patch lasting nearly two years, the five-foot-four-and-a-half-inch vice-captain of the Indian team bounced rich harvest of runs in the Test matches held at New Delhi and Madras, silencing his critics who were making strident calls for bis removal from the Indian Test squad. A glorious knock of 107 in New Delhi last December squashed all doubts about his flagging form. Although he followed this knock with a duck in the Calcutta Test, the 32-year-old Vishwanath came into his own with a ferocious double century in Madras last fortnight, the highest ever made by any Indian player against England and also his highest score in Test cricket. Mused a contented Vishwanath: “Cricket is a funny game. Even if you are on top, if you don’t make runs, you come down.”Vishwanath’s cricketing career stretching through 80 Tests, the highest ever by an Indian, has always been one of constant fluctuations. When he made his Test debut on November 15. 1969 at the Kanpur Test against Australia, he was out for a shameful zero in the first innings: “Though it was my first Test, all I had was a zero when I went into bat in the second innings. After a couple of runs I went on playing and in no time I saw 100 on the board,” reminisced Vishwanath modestly. advertisementVishwanath with his wife, Kavitha: ‘He is basically shy and quiet’But for many cricket lovers it was one of the greatest innings ever played by an Indian batsman. “It was simply out of this world,” remarked a sports correspondent. Vishwanath tore apart a genuine Australian pace attack to join the select of Indian cricketers who have scored centuries on their maiden appearance in Test cricket.Undaunted: But in the same manner as he blazed into Indian Test cricket, he was almost snuffed out by Iris own glory. After his marvellous debut, Vishwanath failed miserably when India toured the West Indies and England in 1971. It was only when England toured India, the next year, that Vishwanath regained his true form, ironically in Kanpur again. In the first innings of that Test, after he scored a measly 25 runs, a selector told him that he was being dropped from the team for the next Test. Undaunted Vishwanath went on to make a classic 75 not out. He was immediately reinstated at the next Test in Bombay where he carved out a scintillating century. Vishwanath had. at last, broken the. myth that those who score a century in their debut in Test cricket do not shine again. It had happened to Kripal Singh and Abbas Ali Baig.At the start of the current series against England, the Lilliputian from Karnataka knew that he had to score well in order to salvage his reputation and a place on the team. “The century in New Delhi against England was the greatest innings I have played so far,” he told India Today, “it was my most fluent innings especially at a time when 1 needed runs and was extremely tense in the beginning.”Vishwanath’s rise to cricket’s hall of fame began in humble surroundings. His father, Gundappa Ranganath, was a stenographer at the State Electricity Board in Bangalore. Vishwanath got his inspiration to play cricket from Jagannath, his elder brother, who represented the state’s junior team. Initially, Vishwanath learnt the rudiments of the game in the corridors of his house playing with his neighbour.The ‘little master’ Rankcd by his parents, Ranganath and SavithrarnmaRamakrishna. Imaginary wickets were drawn on the wall and Vishwanath invariably asked Ramakrishna to bat first because his own batting would usually last for hours. Even at such an early age he was already being nicknamed ‘tennis-cricket’s’ Bradman. Vishwanath considers this period of his cricket training as a vital part of his learning process. Says he: “Tennis-cricket played a big role because it had a lot of bounce off the field. I always had to play down as even getting caught on the first ball was out.It taught me to play all along the ground, something which I do till now.” It also helped him perfect the stroke for which Vishwanath is now famous – the square cut. Because of his low stature, he also learnt to play off the backfoot which is the hallmark of most great batsmen because it gives them a split second more to play their strokes.advertisementDisguised Blessing: From here Vishwanath graduated to his school team, where he not only kept wickets but also became the captain. Perhaps his greatest disappointment in life was that he never played tor the state school team, generally considered a prestigious stint for any aspiring cricketer. Vishwanath was not selected for the strangest of reasons: a selector felt he was too short. Six years later Vishwanath had not grown any taller but he had made it to Test cricket.His failure to secure a place in the state school squad would in fact prove to be a blessing in disguise. For he was immediately picked up by a local cricket club called the Spartans and made to play straightaway in the senior division league. Spartans’ Managar, B.N. Chandrashekar. encouraged Vishwanath right from the outset and even presented him with his first bat. Vishwanath fondly recalls how ‘”that was a great moment for me.’For the present, Vishwanath is right in the thick of it all, and withthe kind of panache he has displayed in the current series, he has along way to go before he can hang up his bat.’At last, I had a bat I could call my own and take home with me”. Another incident which left a deep impression on him was his visit to the Chepauk grounds in Madras to watch his first Test match. As he and his brother could afford only gallery seats, they had to go to the stadium at 2.30 in the morning to secure the best vantage point. Jagannath remembers how Vishwanath watched with rapt attention every ball that was bowled in that match. Says Vishwanath: “I don’t think I could get so involved in a Test match now as I did during that match. I thought to myself, I must be in the middle one day.” His premonitions proved right.But if Vishwanath’s ambition was to become a cricketer, his parents” dreams lay elsewhere. Says Ranganath. his father: “I was keen that he finish his degree at least, so that he could get a respectable job.” As if sensing the fame that would descend on him someday, Vishwanath told his mother, Savithramma: “Don’t worry about my studies. even without it, I will be respected one day.”Sure enough, as soon as he passed his intermediate examination. Vishwanath had thrown his books away, grabbed his bat, and played as much cricket as he could. In 1967 he made his memorable Ranji Trophy debut playing against Andhra Pradesh in Vijayawada where he hit a whopping 230, his highest ever. The ‘little master’ had arrived.Wrist-work: If his Test debut was even quicker, he owes it to Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi, the former Indian captain. It was Pataudi who first noticed Vishwanath’s talent when he scored 60-odd runs in a Ranji match against Hyderabad. Pataudi had advised him to exercise with dumb-bells. Vishwanath heeded it and today he hits the ball with apparent ease to the boundary with just a delicate flick of his wrist. Though Vishwanath was not selected for the first Test against Australia in 1969, Pataudi insisted on his inclusion for the second Test match.advertisement Vishwanath found himself making his debut when he was 20 years old. The rest is history. In retrospect, the duck in the first innings at Kanpur has had a profound impact on Vishwanath’s attitude to batting. “When I go out to bat, the first thing I think of is that I should not get out for zero. Only when I get it am I relaxed,” he confesses. Does that mean that he is tense when he is out in the middle all the time? “I am always tense before I go into bat for whatever type of match I am playing, but once I get there in the middle I leave my tension behind in the dressing room. I am calm. If you become tense while batting, you can’t move your feet well. For me it does not matter if we are zero for 32 or two for 32,1 just go there and play my cricket. I play my natural game. I don’t know what pressure is.”Vishwanath is considered to be one of the greatest stroke players in the world and even Gavaskar admits that Vishwanath is superior to him in this department. “He is a genius, an absolute genius,” raved well-known cricket critic Rajan Bala, sports editor of Decern Herald, “there has been no batsmen like Vishwanath earlier, he is one batsman who transcends technique. He is the most natural player I have seen in decades. He keeps the basics aside, that is his success. He varies and improvises. He plays blatantly across the line and hits fantastic shots. Even Kallicharan does not have his silent touch. When he gets set, it is a challenge for any captain to place a field for him. Vishy is always finding gaps with the most incredible shots.”It is the ability to improvise his shots and rip apart the best bowling that distinguishes Vishwanath from Gavaskar who is undoubtedly the most scientific player in India.Greatest Knock: One of his greatest innings was in Madras again, against the fiery West Indian pace attack spearheaded by Andy Roberts in 1974-75. While other Indian wickets fell like ninepins, Vishwanath rescued India out of trouble with an exhilarating 97 not out. He was so aggressive that the only way Roberts could prevent him from taking a run was to bowl a bouncer. Vishwanath does not use brute force when he plays but caresses the ball to the boundary. Wrote a sports critic: “Watching him in full flow is like listening to Bach: each note, each stroke part of an overall plan yet somehow distinct.” His childhood hero was that great Australian batsman. Neil Harvery whom Vishwanath only read about but never saw.It is perhaps ironical that the two little masters of Indian cricket, Vishwanath and Gavaskar, should constitute the backbone of the team, and even stranger, be related. It was in March 1978 that Vishwanath married Kavitha Gavaskar, the skipper’s younger sister. They met when Sunil once took Vishwanath to his home in Bombay.For Kavitha, love is not only keeping his cricket bat clean-as a poster drawn by her in their tastefully decorated living room in Bangalore indicates -it is providing the much-needed moral support that Vishwanath craves for, especially when he fails to score. She also does his shopping which he hates to do himself. Vishwanath has this peculiar habit, Kavitha thinks, of buying all the available colours in shirts of a particular design he likes. Explained the Test star nonchalantly: “I find shopping tiring and if I like the design why should I go elsewhere to shop? 1 buy the whole lot.”Greatness, it is said, comes in a cloak of humility. It is the same mantle that drapes Vishwanath. for even to this day, he remains as humble as when he started: a trait he attributes to his upbringing. Says Kavitha: “He is basically shy and quiet. He opens out only when he is with friends. He is an extremelycool person, nothing ruffles him unless I try to get under his skin.” Exudes B.S. Chandrashekhar, India’s former spinning wizatd who has seen Vishwanath right from the start: “He is a fantastic man. In his heart, he is a genuine person.” Gavaskar once observed that Vishwanath was the only player both his team-mates and opponents liked. Asked what he thinks of himself, Vishwanath replied unassumingly: “I am Vishwanath. I play cricket,” and added with a twinkle, “I am an easy-going person.” It is his accommodating nature that makes him perhaps the best vice-captain India has had. But he would never make a good captain. As a sports critic remarked: “He is easier led than leading.”A day in the life of Vishwanath usually begins with a game of badminton. He plays in the same court where Prakash Padukone trained himself to be a champion. After a quick shower and breakfast he goes to the State Bank of India where he works as an officer, a far cry from the clerk’s post he was given 13 years ago. He works in the bank till 3.30 p.m. and then puts in at least two hours at the nets. He spends evenings either with Kavitha or simply visiting friends. Vishwanath hates films and books, likes music but has no favourites and loves watching cricket on video. His favourite food is steak but he is not fussy about his eating habits. Because of his aversion to shopping, he does not buy anything when he goes abroad except tooth brushes, says Kavitha. “I am not a fancy person,” he says with a shrug.Devotee: Religion plays a fairly important role in Vishwanath’s life. He is an ardent devotee of Sai Baba and worships the famous Lord Venkateshwara temple at Tirupati. He visits Tirupati before the start of every season. After his century at Delhi, he had vowed that if he did well in Madras he would pay his respects to the temple again. Immediately after his double century, he rushed to Tirupati to fulfil his vow. In fact he is so religious that he wears a ring having an image of Lord Venkateshwara carved on it and a necklace with two charms attached to it, one given by Sai Baba and the other by his mother-in-law. Before he plays every ball he peers down his shirt at the image of Sai Baba on his chain. Vishwanath’s philsophy of life is not to take success or failure too hard but to just carry on. It is the same with his cricket. If he gets out cheaply, he feels bad for the moment but is soon cheerful again by telling himself that all this is part of the game. Asked what it is he likes about cricket, he replied: “I like getting runs. There is nothing like getting runs in Test cricket.”Traits: Characteristic of a man who has started clear of all controversies in the game. another of Vishwanath’s traits is his sportsmanship. He walks back to the pavilion if he thinks he is out even before the umpire raises his lingers. Asked why he does this, Vishwanath’s surprising answer was: “I don’t know why I do it. It all happens on the spur of the moment. I don’t like to stay in the middle when I think I am out. But when I am halfway back to the pavilion I wonder why I walked out without waiting for the umpire’s decision. Now with so many unfair decisions. I am slowly learning. I don’t think I would be able to walk away like I used to do before.”Vishwanath is also learning to wear a protective helmet which he once scorned saying: “I only wear a helmet when I ride a scooter.” Now he says that if the bowling is really fierce then the helmet gives him confidence.Vishwanath’s recent return to form was preceded by his failure in two consecutive cricket seasons which he attributes to his faulty technique. Moreover, he felt he was slower than before. Last year he got himself toned up, losing eight kg of weight by playing badminton. He now weighs a decent 61 kg with the necessary changes in technique, the vintage Vishwanath with all his grace and aggression was back.But Vishwanath’s critics think he is a spent force. Says one of them: “He is on the decline: age has taken its toll. His reflexes have decreased. The quickness is gone. He can no more play a charismatic and dramatic innings.” But Vishwanath hotly denies that he is facing a downward trend. Said he candidly: “Age has definitely not slowed me down. I am just 32, I am fitter than what I used to be a year ago. I still feel I have a lot of cricket in me. Reaching the peak means getting going all the time and I should be doing this by next season.”At the end of the Madras Test, Vishwanath had. crossed the century mark 14 times in his career and hit 5,672 runs in Test cricket averaging an impressive 43.63 runs. No doubt, for the present Vishwanath is right in the thick of it all and with the kind of panache* he had displayed in the current series, he has a long way to go before he can hang up his bat.last_img read more

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Lateral traction

first_imgDefinitionLateral traction is a treatment technique in which weight or tension is used to move a body part to the side or away from its original location.InformationTraction can be used to treat or reduce any joint dislocation by applying tension to the leg or arm with weights and pulleys to realign the bone. For example, it may be used to help keep a dislocated hip within the hip socket while it heals.Traction as a treatment involves the amount of tension or force used, the length of time the tension is used, and the means used to maintain the tension. Lateral traction can also be used to treat some broken bones.ReferencesRosipal CE, Wirth MA, da Silva Leitao IC, Rockwood CA Jr. Shoulder: Injuries to the sternoclavicular joint in the adult and child. In: DeLee JC, Drez D Jr, Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drez’s Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2009:chap 17, section B.Review Date:4/16/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.last_img read more

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5 things to watch for between Ohio State and Western Michigan

OSU junior running back Ezekiel Elliott (15) falls to the ground after a carry in a game against Northern Illinois on Sept. 19 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 20-13. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead / Photo EditorComing off another rather unconvincing win against Northern Illinois, Ohio State will have a chance to redeem itself on Saturday against Western Michigan. Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m. at Ohio Stadium.Here are five things that The Lantern’s sports editors Ryan Cooper and Kevin Stankiewicz will be on the lookout for during the game. Check back after the game to see how these points played out.The discombobulated offense’s turnover problemsThrough three games, OSU has turned the ball over a total of eight times. In all of college football, there are only eight teams that have more turnovers than the Buckeyes.Coach Urban Meyer expressed his concern with that statistic during the week, calling the rate at which his team has turned it over “alarming.”Against Virginia Tech, OSU had three of them — two fumbles and an interception by redshirt junior Cardale Jones. The Hokies scored on each of the ensuing possessions, totaling 17 points.The Buckeyes didn’t cough it up against Hawaii in Week 2, but against NIU the turnover problems reappeared as OSU had five.But unlike against VT, points off turnovers were less of an issue as the Huskies only managed 10 points because twice OSU’s defense forced an NIU to turn the ball over on the ensuing possession.Meyer said the coaching staff will focus during the week on fixing the issue of turnovers.It will be interesting to see if the Buckeyes were able to address the problem enough during practice, as a team on a quest to repeat as national champions cannot afford to be giving opponent’s extra possessions, especially with Big Ten play on the horizon.Will Elliott’s explosiveness reappear?Junior running back Ezekiel Elliott has rushed for over 100 yards in all three contests in 2015 but the preseason Heisman Trophy hopeful has yet to look like the same player who carried OSU on his back during last year’s postseason games by running for over 200 yards thrice.The only hint of that player came on his first run of the season by way of an 80-yard touchdown. But other than that one play, Elliott’s explosiveness has been kept in check.Sans the 80-yarder, the St. Louis native’s season long rush is only 13 yards.With Elliott, it is more of question of when — not if — he regains his form from 2014. Fortunately for the Buckeyes, this weekend might be a good chance for him as Western Michigan’s run defense has been dreadful.WMU ranks 109th in the nation in run defense. Opponents have been torching the Broncos on the ground. Michigan State had 196 yards in Week 1, but that pales in comparison to the 413 Georgia Southern racked up the following game.So, as for when Elliott’s explosiveness will resurface, Saturday could be the day. Who will Jones be able to throw the ball to?Three.That’s the number of receptions the players on OSU’s roster listed as wide receivers and not named Michael Thomas have this season.While the redshirt junior Thomas has done his part despite getting the defense’s top assignment with 10 catches for 158 yards and two scores, the Buckeyes have had an extremely tough time finding any other options.Redshirt senior Corey Smith has two catches for 15 yards and redshirt freshman Johnnie Dixon has a 29-yarder.Beyond that, receivers such as redshirt freshmen Parris Campbell and Terry McLaurin have given Meyer nothing in terms of catching the ball. Campbell, who had two drops in the opening game, is also expected to miss at least a week with a leg injury suffered early against Northern Illinois.When sophomore Noah Brown went down with a broken leg before the season, many speculated about how thin OSU’s receiving corps might be.This has to be considered worse than imagined, however, and is a big reason for the offensive struggles thus far.While players like sophomore H-back Curtis Samuel and redshirt senior tight end Nick Vannett have kept the offense clinging to life, a true wideout not named Thomas stepping up could be the only true remedy.Can Braxton find his early effectiveness?After an electrifying start to the season for H-back Braxton Miller, the redshirt senior has seen his usefulness dwindle each week.Against VT, Miller caught two passes for 78 yards and a score and ran six times for 62 yards and another touchdown. He was undoubtedly the offensive star of that contest, and his spin move around a defender on his rushing touchdown was the highlight of the week.The following week against Hawaii, Miller actually had more touches, but with much less effectiveness. Meyer had his rushes come out of direct snap runs, and his catches came mostly on shovel passes across the middle. In all, he finished with two catches for 16 yards and eight runs for 57 yards, but did not find the end zone.Then last week against NIU, Miller had just seven yards on four carries. He was targeted once by Jones, but a miscommunicated route led to the interception that caused Meyer to pull Jones out of the game.As discussed above, the OSU offense is struggling to stay afloat from a major lack of playmakers. Miller could be the answer to Meyer’s prayers, but whether it’s because of the learning curve of a new position or just not being used correctly, he has not been a big help in OSU’s two home games. Before beginning Big Ten play next week, the Buckeyes will need the former quarterback to rediscover his playmaking abilities.Who wants the sack lead?OSU’s defensive line is arguably the best in the nation, with nine different players already being involved in at least one sack. But with only so many hits on the quarterback to go around, no one is off to a huge individual start.Three players — redshirt sophomore linebacker Darron Lee, redshirt freshman defensive end Sam Hubbard and redshirt sophomore defensive end Tyquan Lewis — have 2.5 sacks each to tie for the team lead.Lewis paced the way early with 1.5 sacks against VT, Lee pulled in the season-high of two sacks against Hawaii and Hubbard was credited with 1.5 against NIU.Lurking in the wings as well is junior Joey Bosa. The defensive end was suspended for the opener, had his first sack of the year called back due to penalty against Hawaii and combined with Hubbard for a sack last week.While Bosa commands double teams on every play — and quite often triple teams — it is hard to rule out a guy who had 13.5 sacks last year for putting his name in the sack-lead hat. At the very least, Bosa’s presence makes it easier for other players to get through the offensive line, something Hubbard said Bosa does not let him forget. read more

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