Notre Dame puts football practice on hold due to virtual class change

first_img Google+ Facebook Twitter Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest Google+ By Know1one1 [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons The University of Notre Dame was hit for a third consecutive day with a big increase in positive COVID-19 cases.Athletic Director Jack Swarbrick made the decision to “pause football practice” on Wednesday, Aug. 19, for at least the day.Swarbrick said the school needed time to address team questions related to the decision to move all classes to online instruction for two weeks.Thursday’s practice might be cancelled, as well. The school announced another 73 positive tests on the campus Wednesday afternoon. CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Twitter By Tommie Lee – August 19, 2020 0 241 WhatsApp Notre Dame puts football practice on hold due to virtual class change Previous articleBristol man killed in motorcycle crash at S.R. 15 and U.S. 20Next articleStudy: Indiana fails at early education systems Tommie Leelast_img read more

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Fran Telles

first_imgFrancis W. Telles, age 91 of Batesville, died Friday, July 31, 2020 at St. Andrews Health Campus. Born October 5, 1928 in Batesville, he is the son of Rose (Nee: Lampe) and Jacob Telles. He married Mary Jane Wilhelm Thanksgiving Day November 25, 1965 at St. Joseph Church in St. Leon, Indiana. Fran served in the Army during the Korean War and was a member of the Ripley Co. V.F.W. Post #3083, the Prell-Bland American Legion Post #271, and St. Louis Church.His family already misses his shrewd sense of humor and the quiet consideration he had for those around him. The bountiful flower and vegetable gardens he so loved to nurture will never be the same. Owner of Telles Barber Shop, Fran was a hard-working man to the end, retiring in 2013 after sixty-nine years of “buzzes and comb overs.” Thus ended 108 years of Telles barbering in Batesville, his father having opened the barbershop in 1905.An enthusiastic and talented athlete, Fran made time to enjoy fishing and golf. He had been an avid baseball player in his younger years, boasting a famous uncatchable and unhittable knuckleball. He loved the game of basketball as well, having played through high school. Family folklore suggests he once offered Bob Knight coaching advice at an open practice in Bloomington. It is, however, a hard fact that a Sports Illustrated writer in 1997 consulted the regulars at Telles Barber Shop for their input when the publication featured a story on Indiana high school basketball. Fran coached Little League Baseball and the Biddi Basketball League (as well as serving as league President) with great success in his later years. More recently, Fran had taken to the sidelines enjoying his grandchildren in their various sports. He is survived by his wife Mary Jane; daughter Becky (Bob) Brown of Milroy, Indiana; sons Gary (Diana) Telles of West Chester, Ohio, Ted (fiancé Erin Gates) Telles of Batesville, Scott (Gina) Telles of Tucson, Arizona, Mark (Becky) Telles of Indianapolis, Tim (Olivia) Telles of Louisville, Kentucky; sister Carolyn Robinson of Indianapolis; brother Jim Telles of Cincinnati, Ohio and 13 grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he is also preceded in death by his sister Maggie Voegele; brother Paul Telles; half-sisters Adeline Mott, Florence Lewis, Mildred Pritchard, Gertrude Gillespie, Mary Wolf, and half-brother Rev. Jordan Telles.Visitation is Tuesday, August 4th, from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home. Funeral services follow at 1:30 p.m. at St. Louis Church with Rev. Stan Pondo officiating. Burial will follow in the church cemetery with military rites conducted by the Batesville V.F.W. and the Prell-Bland American Legion. The family requests memorials to St. Louis School or Oldenburg Academy. The current Governor’s mandate requires all attendees wear a facemask and observe physical distancing. The mask must cover the individual’s nose and mouth at all times.last_img read more

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County Football Final venue decided.

first_imgThe decider will be played next Sunday in Leahy Park, Cashel with a 1.30 throw-in. The County Senior Football final will take place next weekend in Cashel.Loughmore Castleiney will defend their title against Cahir following their respective semi-final wins over Aherlow and Thomas McDonaghs yesterday.Loughmore had 6 points to spare while Cahir emerged victorious by just 2 points.last_img

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Horse Racing Tips

first_imgIAMALLABOUTTHEBEST DEMOLITION BOY IAMALLABOUTTHEBEST IAMALLABOUTTHEBESTLEGENDARY PLEASURE LEGENDARY PLEASURE LEGENDARY PLEASURE LEGENDARY PLEASURECAMPESINO CAMPESINO #CAMPESINO CAMPESINOMOM’S STUDENT MOM’S STUDENT MOM’S STUDENT MOM’S STUDENT#SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLERUNAWAY GAL RUNAWAY GAL ZEPHYR RUNAWAY GALPROLIFIC PRINCESS #SWEET DIMENSION PROLIFIC PRINCESS PROLIFIC PRINCESS#ITALIANO ITALIANO ITALIANO ITALIANOLORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS #LORD EQUUSLOTTERY TICKET HONEY DARLIN HONEY DARLIN LOTTERY TICKETNUCLEAR AFFAIR NUCLEAR AFFAIR #NUCLEAR AFFAIR NUCLEAR AFFAIRBLUE DIXIE #SILVER CLOUD SMOKEY TOPAZ #SMOKEY TOPAZDEMOLITION BOY LEILANI IAMALLABOUTTHEBEST #IAMALLABOUTTHEBESTLEGENDARY PLEASURE LEGENDARY PLEASURE LEGENDARY PLEASURE LEGENDARY PLEASURECAMPESINO CAMPESINO #CAMPESINO CAMPESINO#MOM’S STUDENT #MOM’S STUDENT MOM’S STUDENT #MOM’S STUDENTFIX IT UP SOUND OF MIRACLE FIX IT UP SOUND OF MIRACLERUNAWAY GAL RUNAWAY GAL RUNAWAY GAL RUNAWAY GALPROLIFIC PRINCESS PROLIFIC PRINCESS PROLIFIC PRINCESS PROLIFIC PRINCESSITALIANO ITALIANO MIND SET ITALIANOLORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUSHONEY DARLIN LOTTERY TICKET HONEY DARLIN HONEY DARLIN#NUCLEAR AFFAIR #NUCLEAR AFFAIR #NUCLEAR AFFAIR NUCLEAR AFFAIRBLUE DIXIE SMOKEY TOPAZ SILVER CLOUD SMOKEY TOPAZDEMOLITION BOY DEMOLITION BOY #LEILANI IAMALLABOUTTHEBESTBATIDOR DE MUNDO PERSIAN BELLE LEGENDARY PLEASURE #WATER WAVECAMPESINO CAMPESINO CAMPESINO CAMPESINO#MOM’S STUDENT #MOM’S STUDENT MOM’S STUDENT MOM’S STUDENTSOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLECROWN PRINCESS RUNAWAY GAL ZEPHYR RUNAWAY GALPROLIFIC PRINCESS PROLIFIC PRINCESS PROLIFIC PRINCESS #DAYTON AFFAIRITALIANO MIND SET ITALIANO MIND SETLORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS #LORD EQUUS LORD EQUUS#LOTTERY TICKET LOTTERY TICKET HONEY DARLIN LOTTERY TICKETNUCLEAR AFFAIR #NUCLEAR AFFAIR NUCLEAR AFFAIR NUCLEAR AFFAIRKOBALT SMOKEY TOPAZ SMOKEY TOPAZ SMOKEY TOPAZIAMALLABOUTTHEBEST #DEMOLITION BOYLEGENDARY PLEASURE PERSIAN BELLE#CAMPESINO CAMPESINO#MOM’S STUDENT MOM’S STUDENTSOUND OF MIRACLE SOUND OF MIRACLERUNAWAY GAL RUNAWAY GALPROLIFIC PRINCESS PROLIFIC PRINCESSITALIANO SIR SOUTHLORD EQUUS LORD EQUUSHONEY DARLIN LOTTERY TICKETNUCLEAR AFFAIR NUCLEAR AFFAIRMERITONE #MERITONElast_img read more

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Energy Efficiency Incentives Need Updating

first_imgA broad coalition representing millions of Americans earlier this month urged Congress to modernize and extend expired energy efficiency tax incentives, touting the enormous, long-term benefits for both the industry and U.S. consumers. The coalition is comprised of environmental and efficiency groups, including the Natural Resources Defense Council, alongside leading manufacturers of windows, air conditioners, insulation, and other efficiency components that generate a significant number of U.S. jobs. (In total, energy efficiency supports 2.3 million U.S. workers.) Energy efficiency is generally considered the most effective solution for addressing climate change. But as the letter addressed to House and Senate leaders points out, three efficiency incentives expired on Dec. 31, 2017, leaving the tax code without any direct inducements to cut energy waste.RELATED ARTICLES‘All New Construction and Retrofits Must Be Carbon-Neutral’‘Always On’ Electronics and Appliances Waste BillionsA Fight Ahead For Solar Equipment Tax CreditsA (Potentially) Stronger Weatherization StimulusA Big Plan for Energy Retrofits in New York Meanwhile these incentives, as originally written, are outdated. They reference older building codes or efficiency thresholds, and offer dollar amounts that don’t reflect the current market prices for building technologies and high-efficiency equipment, the letter notes. For example, the incentive to buy a high-efficiency air conditioning system is capped at $300, which isn’t enough to meaningfully affect purchasing decisions on equipment and installation that often runs $10,000 or more. However, the letter says, this “glaring and urgent omission” also represents a golden, bipartisan opportunity. Not only would implementing efficiency credits significantly lower carbon emissions, it would also reduce energy costs for consumers, stimulate job creation, and promote economic opportunity. Tax credits have a proven track record of driving clean energy investments at minimal cost to taxpayers, so lawmakers should be eager to get on board. But because tax incentives have repeatedly expired and been reinstated, consumers, manufacturers, and contractors have found themselves uncertain about their availability, and unable to plan upgrades to the energy efficiency of their buildings accordingly. Thus, the letter also urges Congress to pass a “forward-looking, multi-year extension” that would offer a sense of security to get the most of out of the incentives. The letter calls for increased maximum credits for both new home construction under the Section 45L Energy Efficient Home Credit, as well as homeowner efficiency improvements under the Section 25C Nonbusiness Energy Property Credit for existing homes. It also supports a “modernized, forward-looking, multi-year extension” of the Section 179D incentive for commercial building efficiency improvements. Acting now will cut energy waste for decades Homes and buildings constructed or renovated today will still be in use 50 or 100 years from now; energy-intensive equipment like air conditioners and furnaces will be used for a decade or longer. Because the residential and commercial sector accounts for 40% of U.S. energy consumption, failing to update these incentives now guarantees unnecessary energy waste and carbon emissions for many decades to come. Improved efficiency, on the other hand, will save businesses and consumers hundreds of millions of dollars annually on energy bills, reduce the demand on the utility grid, and make the U.S. more economically competitive. The letter makes note of evidence showing that incentives are utilized more when they are set at meaningful dollar amounts. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, efficiency incentives for home improvements were increased, and nearly 7 million taxpayers claimed them in 2010. In the following years, that number fell to just 2.2 million in 2015, after the incentives dropped to pre-stimulus levels. Proposed changes Previously, the 45L Energy Efficient Home Credit provided builders up to $2,000 for homes that use 50% less energy than 2006 building codes for heating and cooling and a $1,000 tax credit for new manufactured homes that achieved 30% energy savings for heating and cooling or met Energy Star requirements. The proposed increase supported by the group would raise the maximum credit to $2,500 for new homes that meet requirements. Since 45L was enacted in 2005, the number of homes that qualified by using 30% to 50% less energy on heating and cooling rose from less than 1% to around 11%. Similarly, the 25C incentive previously provided a 10% tax credit for the purchase of certain nonbusiness energy-efficient measures up to $500. In 2015, more than $1.6 billion in tax credits were claimed by homeowners who invested in clean energy improvements, with over two-thirds of the benefits going to households with gross incomes under $100,000. The new proposal would raise incentives to provide a 15% tax credit up to $1,200, and also see some individual product category caps eliminated or raised, which would allow homeowners to do multiple projects. Efficiency tax incentives are especially crucial now, as the Trump administration continues its push for more climate-polluting fossil fuels while attempting to undermine the excellent and important progress on energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency reports that efficiency alone can account for at least 40% of the emissions reductions needed to meet global targets. Restoring and improving these incentives offers a bipartisan opportunity that would accomplish goals across the board. Lauren Urbanek is senior energy policy advocate in the Climate & Clean Energy Program of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Republished with permission from the NRDC.last_img read more

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Carl Lewis and Sir Richard Hadlee on Sports at India Today Conclave 2007

first_img“It takes sacrifice”Carl Lewis, Olympic ChampionCarl Lewis and Sir Richard HadleeBeing a champion is something special. I came from a wonderful family, my parents were both coaches and they always encouraged us. When I was growing up, I never thought I would be a champion athlete. I had two brothers,”It takes sacrifice”Carl Lewis, Olympic ChampionCarl Lewis and Sir Richard HadleeBeing a champion is something special. I came from a wonderful family, my parents were both coaches and they always encouraged us. When I was growing up, I never thought I would be a champion athlete. I had two brothers who were successful athletes. I learned at a young age what it was like to not be successful in sports. My mother told me I would be great in athletics and she always said it with her hands behind her back. And I used to wonder why till I realised her fingers were crossed behind her back. I never won races as a kid. But I always set goals for myself. I learned to focus on being the best you can be.As I got older I continued to study and work hard so I could get a scholarship. In my senior year in high school, I became a national champion and national record holder. I started to think, hey, I could be at the Olympics one day. At Houston University, when I met my coach, I looked him in the eye, and said, I am happy to be here. I want to run and be a great athlete. I want to be a millionaire and never have a real job. He said, if you focus on making money and fame, it is never going to happen. Focus on being the best, and you could be an Olympic champion.advertisementIt took hard work and discipline and focus. In my second year of college, I set my first world record. Then I went to a long jump competition where I was leading after three jumps. Though I wasn’t jumping that well, I was winning the competition. I wasn’t entirely focused because I was winning. The coach called me over and said, you are not jumping well. You do not need me, so take over. And he turned and walked out of the stadium. It hit me strongly because I realised that when you get to the top, it becomes even more difficult. You have to keep your focus. Being a champion means always being your best. When I was down with my next jump-I missed the world record by 1cm-he came running back and said, we have two more jumps, now we can set this record. I didn’t set the record that day, but it prepared me for later competitions. I won the long jump and 100 metres.I wondered what it was like for Jesse Owens-my idol- to win four gold medals. I wondered if I could ever do that, because I was a sprinter and did the same events. In 1981, I asked my coach what he thought about me trying to do all four events in 1984. He said, if you want to do it, we have to plan it out now. We set the plan, according to which I would add one more event each year. I was the world No.1 in 100m and long jump then, and I added the 200m next year. Then I added all three events. I had to focus 100 per cent on what I had to do. The events were totally different and I had different shoes for each. I concentrated all my energy according to whatever shoes I wore. It is important to believe in yourself, and surround yourself with people who have the same kind of motivation, attitude and focus as you.WHEN YOU GET TO THE TOP, IT BECOMES EVEN MORE DIFFICULT. BEING A WORLD CHAMPION MEANS ALWAYS BEING YOUR BEST. In 1983, I competed with nationals and I won all three events, but I didn’t go through the world championship. I didn’t do 200m. People wondered if I could compete in all four events. I had great seasons that year, and then they said, it is possible. The focus of the question shifted from can you do it, to what do you think will happen if you get only three. People asked me, would you be disappointed if you won only three golds? Going to the Olympics is a great thing. But hearing people say you would be disappointed if you won only three gold medals-I didn’t get that. That is how they were able to raise expectations. It was important to map out a plan and focus on winning the competition. One had to really stick to that plan. When I got to the Olympic trials, I realised, for the first time, after one of the events, that I could actually do it.advertisementWhen you go to the Olympic, it is altogether different. I went through the competition and I won the first one. I competed over a period of eight days, with just one day off. On the first day, when I won the 100m, the race ended at 7 p.m., and after drug testing and interviews, I went home at 11 o’clock. I had dinner and went to sleep, because at 10 in the morning, I had the long jump and I had to be up four behours early. I had just won the Olympic gold medal in 100m. and I didn’t have one second to celebrate. The minute the race was over, I was already thinking about tomorrow. This went on for the entire week, throughout which the foremost thing was staying focused, because one little slip could make you lose the race. Thus I went on to win four gold medals.Being a champion involves many elements-staying focused, working hard and having good team mates. People around you can help you succeed by telling you the truth when you are not doing what should do. Without the coaching, it would not have happened for me, and I feel fortunate about that. When I talk to kids I say this one thing: if life was easy everybody would be good at it; it isn’t supposed to be like that. So take on the challenge for being the best you can be. That is how you become successful. Oh, and one last thing-make sure you always look good on TV.”Think about destiny”Sir Richard Hadlee, New Zealand Ex-CricketerI served New Zealand cricket during the 1980s, when we remained undefeated at home in Test Series. When you look at what makes a champion, I believe it goes back to when you are young. I was fortunate to be brought up in a cricketing environment. My father captained New Zealand, my brothers had represented New Zealand. As a youngster, I had the gear, the equipment, the encouragement to play the game. I remember going into the garage at home and putting on my father’s cricket cap. I had a ball on a string and I hit that ball again and again, never got out and always scored a hundred. When I felt I had scored an imaginary Test hundred, I would lift my bat up and wave it to the imaginary crowd. Since my hand was too small to bowl a cricket ball, I bowled a golf ball. That was at the age of five. At 16, I helped operate the giant scoreboard at Lancaster Park. I looked over at the Test match in progress and said to myself, wouldn’t it be wonderful one day to be up there playing a real Test match for my country? Five years later, that dream became a reality. I learnt that talent only gets you so far; it needs to be converted into performance. And to do that you need skills. There is no room for complacency.advertisementMENTAL TOUGHNESS IS AS MUCH ABOUT WINNING AGAINST THE ODDS AS IT IS ABOUT BEING RUTHLESS WHEN IT IS TOO EASY. Now I tell you that I bowled 1,10,000 cricket balls during my first-class international career. I tried to perfect that skill to become clinically efficient, but I also tried to visualise things happening during my career. In 1988, I needed one more wicket to become the world record holder. I had visualised the next opportunity that I would get to bowl my next ball. It was at the Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore. I read up on the venue. I knew that a fellow called Kris Srikkanth was the Indian opening batsman. I knew his technique, I had got him out before and I knew he batted in a blue helmet. On November 12, 1988, things I had visualised were on track, until my dream was totally shattered. Srikkanth came out to bat in a white helmet. The other opening batsman was Arun Lal-I had never heard of him. I was distracted. I had be came too narrow minded. When you visualise, you need to have a wide picture. Arun Lal became a world record wicket and a few balls later, Kris Srikkanth did as well.I kept questioning whether I could go beyond what I thought I was capable of achieving. I was aiming for the English cricket county double-a double is capturing 100 first-class wicket during the season and scoring 1,000 runs in that same season. I had 20 matches to achieve this goal, so I worked out a budgeted calculation. Simply five wickets and 50 runs a game. But if I didn’t get five wickets in a game or didn’t get to bat or got out for naught, the budget and the goal changed, so I had to be flexible. I was on target for the wicket tally but I was always behind on the run tally. Nottinghamshire was to play Middlesex. We had bowled Middlesex out for 168 and when we batted we had lost 4 wickets for 17 runs. Captain Clive Rice said to me, “Go out there and score a double hundred.” I said, we are in trouble, you are out for naught and you are telling me to go there and score a double hundred against one of the best bowling attacks? He said, just go out there and do it. I walked up to bat and came back with 210 not out. Rice had put a thought in my mind that I had never considered before. One should go beyond what one thinks one is capable of achieving.Mental toughness comes when you improve your performance to win against the odds. But it is also about handling the situation when it is all too easy and having the ability to be ruthless and efficient. My job as a bowler was not only to get batsmen out, it was to destroy the opposition to help win games, and sometimes end the playing career of some players. I had a little card in my bag to keep me focused, with four words in it: rhythm, offstump, desire and Lillee. Bowling was about rhythm and coordination. It was about being relaxed. If I was stiff and tense, my body was not going to function. The offstump was my target area. My desire and my job was to get the batsmen out. Dennis Lillee, arguably the greatest fast bowler in the history of the game, was my role model.I was motivated by a number of things and what motivated me wouldn’t necessarily motivate other people. I was motivated by competition. I wanted to be the best. I was motivated by a determination to prove a point. And I have never forgotten what my father once said to me. He said, Richard, whatever you do, take pride in your performance. Do it to the best of your ability. I was also motivated by statistics and records, rewards and recognition. To quote from an unknown source, “We cannot choose to be born, we cannot choose our parents, we cannot choose our country, we cannot choose our history. But in a choiceless society, we can choose to live honourably or dishonourably. We can live courageously or in cowardice. We can live with purpose or drift. But in the end, forming your destiny is what ambition is all about.” DISCUSSIONQ. Carl, should India concentrate on sports that it thinks it can win medals in or is it better to go across the board? Lewis: I think you have enough people. You can do all of the sports. You really need people who set the tone. I refuse to believe that there is not someone who can be a world-class sprinter or marathoner somewhere amongst the billion people. What India would need is people with credibility.Q. Sir Richard, would you say that in a team sport like cricket, the focus is different from that in individual sports? Hadlee: Cricket is a team sport but it is also one of the greatest individual sports, because 11 people are going to take to the field to play. It is a one-on-one battle between the bowler and the batsman, skill against skill, and when you talk about the all-rounder, he has got to bowl and also bat. It is probably the hardest role to play. It takes a special person who will be able to handle the role and the pressure of that particular job. So, cricket is a bit different than many other sports.Q. Both of you said the two key ingredients for success are focus and mental strength. Are these hereditary traits or can they be developed? Hadlee: You can have all the skills and all the talent but it takes preparation, an attitude to do the right thing and sacrifices. If you miss any of those elements, you are a lesser performer. Lewis: When you have confidence- confidence comes from preparation and hard work and being ready-luck is made in lot of cases. Because you have to be ready for what is going to happen.Q. What keeps you motivated after you reach the 400th wicket or get the world record? Hadlee: When you achieve a goal it does not happen in one giant step. You find what goal-setting is all about. Once you have achieved that particular goal, you must look to find something to keep you going. Lewis: I never focused on a world record but only on performance. A lot of young people in sports will think of the end result first and I think there is a process to get to that end result and that is the training and preparation.Q. Carl, you came to the system with talented athletes- Willie Gault, Emmitt King and Calvin Smith. What was the difference between you and them? Lewis: I have always felt that my coach was the best. But I guess at the end of the day, some of it is talent, some of it is drive. I wanted to be the best I could be. I was not afraid of trying things. Most people do not try to compete in four events.Q. Should sportsmen look more towards money than towards sports? Cricket, at least, is now more about money. Hadlee: Money is the end result of performance. When young people burst on the sports scene, they want the cars, the contracts, the endorsements, the fees and all the extras before they have even earned it. And if you perform well over a period of time, the rewards take care of themselves. A lot of youngsters have got it all back to front in their attitude and approach to sports.last_img read more

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10 days agoBlythe Spartans winger Cal Roberts targets Premier League return

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Blythe Spartans winger Cal Roberts targets Premier League returnby Paul Vegas10 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Newcastle United winger Cal Roberts retains hope of returning to the Premier League.Roberts, 22, signed for Blythe Spartans this season.He told the Evening Chronicle: “When I first came it was good, and the reception I got when I signed the contract made us feel special and part of the club.”I’ve never felt like this at a club before, you feel like you’re wanted there and happy. I’ve never been happier at a football club than I am at the minute.”Roberts added: “I set my standards very high, and I always want to better myself. The aim is still to play in the Premier League.”At the minute I’m very happy playing at Blyth, but the club and the gaffer knows I want to play at the highest level.” last_img read more

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2 days agoFerdinand: Man City winger Sterling among world’s top five players

first_imgFerdinand: Man City winger Sterling among world’s top five playersby Paul Vegas2 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveRio Ferdinand says Manchester City winger Raheem Sterling is one of the top five players in football.The 24-year-old netted his first Champions League hat-trick in Tuesday’s 5-1 win over Atalanta.”We are running out of great words to say about him,” England and Manchester United legend Ferdinand said on BT Sport.”He is a young English player who has played a lot of games. He is still improving and adding more to his game. He has a striker’s nose to get into certain areas.”He is in the top five players in the world now. Definitely! I don’t care who you mention. The effect he is having, the goals he is scoring, it is impossible to keep him out.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Philpott commits to spending more on child welfare calling it a humanitarian

first_img(Jane Philpott addressing the AFN SCA Wednesday in Ottawa. Photo: Mark Blackburn/APTN)Paul BarnsleyAPTN NewsThe Minister of Indigenous Services has pledged to spend millions more on the First Nations child welfare issue in the coming budget to address what she called a “humanitarian crisis.”Jane Philpott was the third federal cabinet minister to address the chiefs when she spoke to the Assembly of First Nations Wednesday.Philpott, now three months into the job of heading a newly-created federal department, touched on a number of topics but she led off with the story she’d heard of a First Nation woman she called Laura.Laura was in care her entire life. She became pregnant at age 16. Merely because she had been in contact with the system, her first child was apprehended at birth by child and family services workers, the minister said. Her second and third children were likewise seized at birth.When Laura became pregnant for the fourth time, she went to the First Nation family advocate in her region.“She asked if she could just spend one whole day with her baby before it was taken,” Philpott said. “But when the child was born, it was seized. Laura did not get her wish.”The minister said she’s heard many such stories. She called the child and family services (CFS) situation for First Nations people a “humanitarian crisis.”The minister has called for an emergency meeting on CFS issues for next year. She said First Nation children make up 7.7 per cent of all Canadian children in the zero to 14-year-old age group, but make up 52 per cent of children in care.“And in some regions, it’s as high as 90 per cent,” she said. “That is absolutely unacceptable.”Noting that $635 million had been targeted for First Nation child welfare initiatives in the 2016 federal budget, Philpott acknowledged that the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal has said that “much more must be done” by the federal government.The minister committed that there would be additional funding coming in Budget 2018 but would not say how much. She also committed to listen to and work closely with First Nation leaders in her search for a solution.“This must be fixed,” she said. “We have the opportunity to have a nation-to-nation direct conversation on this. We all know it’s going to take more than just money. It’s going to require systemic reform.”Later, during a media scrum after her address, Philpott made one additional point. She said social workers should not remove children from their families simply because they were low income.“I want to be on the record saying poverty should never be a reason to remove children,” she said.Memo to cabinet on education in the worksThe minister said she “was pleased to hear” that the chiefs had approved a resolution that would see First Nation control of First Nation education the day before. The resolution sought to open up access to large pool of money targeted at improving on-reserve education. The First Nation initiative sought to remove government controls and allow local governments to use the cash to tailor their education system to their own local needs.Philpott told the chiefs there was a memo to cabinet being prepared by her officials that would propose legislation that would enable just that.“This is the first memo to cabinet entirely co-developed by First Nations,” she said. “And yes, I will confirm, education is a treaty right.”S-3 poised to become law (A number of chiefs and delegates stood to challenge Philpott on how the government is dealing with First Nation communities. Photo: Mark Blackburn/APTN)Philpott told the chiefs that getting more First Nations people job skills and employment would bring $27.7 billion a year into the economy.She said that could be accomplished if the government and First Nations can repair their fiscal relationship.“There have been nine attempts since 1983 to do that so I can understand your skepticism,” she said. “To prove we’re serious a working group report recommendation to establish a permanent advisory committee has been accepted,” she said.The committee will be in operation by March of 2019, she added.The minister is looking to eliminate barriers to economic activity on reserve.“The excessive reporting burden needs to be addressed,” she said.She said government approaches with First Nations up to now have been “patronizing, punitive and regressive.”Rather than have hundreds of reports required for First Nations to account for federal program dollars, she proposed a United Nations model which looked at key economic indicators to assess the how effectively the money was being used.She also said the government was planning “10-year grants” to replace the current short-term funding agreements and added First Nations “would report to their own community members” rather than the federal [email protected] (AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde at the AFN SCA in Ottawa. Photo: Mark Blackburn/APTN)“There are going to be more status Indians,” National Chief Perry Bellegarde told the chiefs Wednesday morning as they awaited the arrival of Philpott.Bellegarde was talking about the results of a vote in favour of an amendment to a bill that originated in the Senate. It moved through the legislative process but was stalled when Senator Lillian Dyck insisted on the amendment that would extend the reach of the bill – designed to eliminate discrimination against women in Section 6 of the Indian Act – all the way back to Confederation. The government was proposing to limit the reach of the new legislation at 1951, a year when extensive changes were made to the Indian Act.Section 6 of the Indian Act was thrown out by a BC judge in the 2009 McIvor decision and the court gave the federal government a deadline to replace Section 6. Eventually, the government passed legislation addressing the court ruling.But three Abénakis people from the Odanak First Nation in Quebec, Stéphane Descheneaux, Susan Yantha and Tammy Yantha, believed the government’s response did not go far enough. They went back to court and won in a case that has become known as the Descheneaux case.S-3 will restore status to women who were treated differently than men in certain situations.As with Bill C-31, the government’s first attempt to eliminate gender discrimination in the Indian Act which was passed in 1985, chiefs are worried that more status Indians will not necessarily mean more funding, which would result in a net loss for most on reserve residents.“It’s a good thing you’re ending discrimination,” the national chief said. “But will there be sufficient resources?”And Bellegarde pointed out that money is not the only consideration.“The crown, they’re making half a treaty Indian,” he said. “Where’s the land?”He said the treaties all called for so many acres per person or family and adding more people should mean adding more land.“First Nations currently have 0.2 per cent of the land,” he added.Permanent advisory committee to be createdlast_img read more

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Eldorado shares fall as it cuts production guidance at Kisladag mine in

first_imgTORONTO – Shares in Eldorado Gold Corp. fell more than 10 per cent in late-morning trading after the gold miner cut its guidance for gold production from its Kisladag mine in Turkey.The stock was down 49 cents or about 18 per cent at $2.24 on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The company says gold recovery from the leach pad at the operation has lagged internal expectations.Eldorado says it now expects production from Kisladag this year to be 170,000 to 180,000 ounces at cash costs of $500 to $550 per ounce. It also placed its guidance for 2018 and beyond under review.The revised guidance was down from an estimate of 180,000 to 210,000 ounces in June and the company’s original 2017 guidance for 230,000 to 245,000 ounces.Eldorado, which has operations in Turkey, Greece, Canada, Romania, Serbia and Brazil, calls Kisladag its flagship gold mine.last_img read more

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