CAFAmerica to distribute royalities from Bob Dylan’s Christmas album to Crisis

first_img Royalties from Bob Dylan’s new Christmas album, ‘Christmas in the Heart’, will be donated to UK charity CRISIS through the channel of a ‘Donor Advised Fund‘ (DAF) administered by CAFAmerica.A DAF allows donors in the US to support and manage philanthropic initiatives outside the USA and to give tax-effectively across borders.Columbia/Epic, a label of Sony Music Entertainment, have opened a DAF for the purpose of donating royalties from Dylan’s new album to make grants to CRISIS. CAFAmerica will also help Bob Dylan to support other charities outside the US. Advertisement CAFAmerica to distribute royalities from Bob Dylan’s Christmas album to Crisis Howard Lake | 14 December 2009 | News Royalties from the album will be donated to charity in perpetuity. ‘Christmas in the Heart’ has already raised $125,000 for charity.CAFAmerica CEO Susan Saxon-Harrold said: “CAFAmerica is delighted to find a charitable solution to assist Bob Dylan and his record company in supporting the causes they are committed to globally”.Bob Dylan announced that royalties in perpetuity from sales of his first ever Christmas album will be donated to US nonprofit Feeding America, as well as CRISIS and the World Food Programme.CRISIS estimates that the initial proceeds of the donations will provide 15,000 meals for homeless people in the UK over Christmas, as well as 500,000 meals for schoolchildren in the developing world.Bob Dylan said: “The problem of hunger is ultimately solvable, which means we must each do what we can to help feed those who are suffering and support efforts to find long-term solutions.”The music video for Bob Dylan’s song ‘Must Be Santa’ was directed by Nash Edgerton.[Original video was published in Flash so has been removed]. Tagged with: Celebrity Charities Aid Foundation christmas Tradingcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis4  165 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis4 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Long hours hit accountants’ careers

first_img Comments are closed. Long hours hit accountants’ careersOn 27 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Accountancyfirms’ working practices have come under the spotlight following research whichreveals that four out of 10 accountants are fed up with their long hours.Thestudy, published by the Institute of Chartered Accountants this month, finds thatregular working in the evenings and at weekends is common. Atotal of 57 per cent of respondents said they often work evenings, 37 per centwork at weekends and 27 per cent fail to take leave entitlements.Thestudy forms the first phase of the institute’s workplace initiative to tackleskills shortages in the profession.KathrynBritten, chairwoman of the initiative said, “The first phase of the researchreflects a real concern that failing to comply with the stereotypicaloffice-based, long-hours culture is detrimental to the individual’s career.”Thefindings, which also cover HR managers, show that flexible working practicesare spreading. Allfirms surveyed offer part-time/reduced hours working and study leave and 80 percent provide secondment opportunities and career breaks.However,many respondents are unaware of all the flexible provisions offered by firms. Only12 per cent of respondents said it was easy to find out about work-life supportprogrammes in their organisations.CarmenBurton, HR manager for the accountancy firm the Norton Practice, told PersonnelToday that her firm was reviewing its working hours.Shesaid, “From a personal point of view, we don’t like employees to work weekendsbut evening work is up to the employee. “Weare looking at flexible working practices but our partners have reservationsabout this – it’s an issue of trust.”Burtonagrees with the survey’s findings that chartered accountants under 30 are mostlikely to regard working long hours as unacceptable. She said, “I’ve noticedtrainees are less adaptable to long working hours.”Theresearch was conducted by the Umist school of management and ManchesterMetropolitan University, which received 670 responses from charteredaccountants.www.icaew.co.ukByKaren Higginbottom Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Systems to be put in place for athletes’ COVID-19 screening – Jones

first_imgBy Clifton RossDIRECTOR of Sport (DoS), Christopher Jones, said communication between the local sports associations and the National Sports Commission (NSC) is crucial with regard to athletes travelling abroad, adding that measures will be put in place to properly screen Guyana’s sportspersons.Jones, in an exclusive with Chronicle Sport gave updates on the current situation surrounding the country’s curfew extension to June 17 which directly affects the local sports facilities as well as plans to help screen and protect the country’s top and upcoming sportsmen who are slowly being called back out to battle in the middle of the pandemic.Regarding the local venues used to house sports events and such, Jones said those places will remain closed until rules are further relaxed. The country’s top sport venues such as the National Gymnasium, Colgrain Pool, National Racquet Centre, Cliff Anderson Sports Hall, the National Stadium among other popular facilities, have been closed and under quarantine for almost 3 months since the pandemic.Jones said when the government commenced its mandate to have those facilities sterilised and kept under lock back in March, the process has been a continuous one which has been going smoothly thus far.The DoS pointed out that every other day the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) workers have been ensuring that the facilities are properly fumigated with limited, restricted access to persons in and out of the relevant sites.More importantly, with the floodgates of live sports seemingly on the open again with a number of regional and international tournaments set to recommence in the near future, Jones said it was important for the local sports associations to work along with the NSC in order to properly manage the welfare/health of its athletes, especially those who are international stars.Guyana has been one of the main bread-baskets of sports over the past 7 years, with more and more Guyanese athletes across all sports making regional or/and international headlines.From cricket, mainly, to athletics, local sportsmen and women have been doing their part in putting Guyana on the map with regard to sports and the director pointed out that it was for that very reason the various sport entities and the NSC needed to work closely, ensuring the well-being and health of Guyana’s top athletes amidst the pandemic.“We will definitely have to put a system in place in order to screen our athletes, especially if they will be travelling to one of pandemic’s hotspots, to represent our country sometime in the future,” said Jones.The NSC has gained the support of all the local sports bodies since the COVID-19 regulations took effect almost 3 months ago. Although the local scene has been quiet because of the lockdown, teamwork among NSC, parents of athletes, athletes themselves and their respective sports associations has been crucial in combating the spread of the virus as well as keeping the public heavily educated about the current state of things.As such, Jones said this relationship needs to continue especially with the wheels turning again and Guyana being one of the Caribbean countries with a number of international sports figures, who are constantly overseas as ambassadors for their nation.Regarding athletes travelling abroad in the future, communication between the entities is crucial as measures will need to be put in place, in order to allow that aspect of representation to flow smoothly again.“If our athletes are travelling, we will need to have that detailed bit of information presented to the MOPH by the respective sports association. That’s why they (sports associations) and NSC will have to work together so we can ensure the safety of all our athletes and Guyanese alike going forward,” Jones ended.last_img read more

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SCRAMBLE FOR TICKETS STARTS AS DONEGAL ALLOCATED 16,088 PASSES FOR BIG GAME

first_imgCOUNTDOWN TO CROKER: The scramble is now officially on for All-Ireland tickets after it was announced last night that Donegal has received a total of 16,088 tickets for the big game.All-Ireland tickets will be hard to come by yet again for Donegal fans.A total of 13,518 of these tickets or 84% have been allocated to clubs across Donegal for distribution to members for the September 21st clash against Kerry at Croke Park.However, it has now been revealed that membership to clubs locally has jumped by a whopping 51% since the scramble for tickets when Donegal last appeared in the final in 2012. This means that each adult member of a club is entitled to 1.2 tickets.When that is broken down it will mean that there will be less surplus tickets for children affiliated to clubs because of the huge jump in membership.The actual percentage of tickets allocated to club’s this year is the same as it was for the 2012 final.It is unclear where exactly the remaining 2,570 tickets outside of the club allocation will go to in the county. There does not to be any further ticket allocation despite the fact that the Donegal minor team will also be appearing in the All-Ireland Final showcase.No other details of the ticket allocation was announced on the county’s official website donegalgaa.ie.Fans will be hoping that a further ticket allocation may be forthcoming from GAA headquarters.If Kerry clubs and fans get a similar allocation, this will mean that there is approximately 50,000 tickets will be distributed throughout the rest of the country.Clubs across the county have been urging members to contact their committees to get their names in so a fair distribution of tickets can be arrived at. SCRAMBLE FOR TICKETS STARTS AS DONEGAL ALLOCATED 16,088 PASSES FOR BIG GAME was last modified: September 9th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:all-irelandallocationClubsdonegalfinalticketslast_img read more

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Do ES Stem Cells Prevent Heart Disease?

first_imgThe promise of stem cells, whether embryonic or adult, is in their power to differentiate into any type of somatic cell.  Although adult stem cells have racked up an impressive number of therapeutic successes,* embryonic (ES) stem cells have only been promised to do so – until now.  In Science Oct. 8,1 Cornell scientists coaxed embryonic stem cells to prevent a fatal heart defect in mouse embryos, but in an unusual way: they did not differentiate into heart tissues at all, but locally (in the blastocyst) and “from a distance” (via the mother’s circulatory system) secreted factors that stimulated the embryo to trigger the formation of its own cardiac cells.  Three UC San Diego scientists, in the same issue,2 explain:Unlocking the therapeutic potential of embryonic stem (ES) cells has remained a tantalizing but elusive goal.  In this new era of “regenerative medicine,” the central experimental game plan has been predicated on driving the differentiation of ES cells along specific cell lineages (for example, neural, cardiac, endocrine), expansion and purification of the cell type of interest, and in vivo repopulation of damaged or degenerating organs by ES cell-derived differentiated cells.  However, there are numerous hurdles to using ES cells as therapeutic tools.  These include the need for reliable ES cell differentiation protocols for different cell lineages, purification techniques for the differentiated progeny, as well as ways to circumvent the immunological rejection of transplanted cells.  Given the complexity of these multiple steps, it is not surprising that there are few clear examples of in vivo ES cell therapy for treating disease-related phenotypes. On page 247 of this issue, an exciting new study by Fraidenraich and co-workers1 expands the potential therapeutic repertoire of ES cells.  These investigators provide direct evidence that ES cells can rescue otherwise lethal cardiac defects in mouse embryos.  Intriguingly, the rescue effect is not subject to the differentiation of ES cells into the cardiac cell lineages that are normally associated with heart regeneration.  Rather, the therapeutic effect of the transplanted ES cells depends on their secretion of defined factors that act either locally within the embryonic heart, or at a distance via the maternal circulation, to trigger fetal myocyte proliferation in utero.Stem cells from an embryo face rejection because they do not belong to the individual being treated and are seen as invaders.  In addition, they have a tendency to produce deformed embryos when injected into a blastocyst.  Adult stem cells from the patient’s own tissues do not have the rejection problem, and undergo differentiation as expected.  So while adult stem cell therapies have already demonstrated the differentiation of cells into other types, these ES cells in this study did not – they merely secreted substances that caused a mutated mouse embryo, which otherwise would have died before birth, to grow its own cardiac cells.  In essence, the secreted factors only stimulated the mouse’s own genes to supply missing ingredients caused by the mutation.  Since stem cell differentiation was not involved, and the stem cells did not get incorporated into the mouse tissues, what kind of benefit does this study promise for human therapies?Given the potential of ES cells to induce the formation of teratomas (defective embryonic tissue), these findings do not necessarily suggest that administering ES cells to pregnant mothers will become a new therapeutic approach for treating congenital heart disease.  However, given that a subset of maternal factors can cross the placenta, there remains a possibility that a subset of embryonic cardiac defects could be partially corrected by the careful delivery of the necessary proteins in the maternal circulation.  Increasingly, congenital heart defects can be diagnosed accurately in utero with noninvasive imaging technology.  In addition, ES cell-based assay systems may ultimately allow for the identification of likely candidate maternal factors that could correct a subset of severe human congenital heart defects.The potential benefits of this study, therefore, appear tentative at best, while adult stem cells have a proven track record without ethical concerns.*For examples, use the Search box with the phrase adult stem cells.1Fraidenraich et al., “Rescue of Cardiac Defects in Id Knockout Embryos by Injection of Embryonic Stem Cells,” Science, Science, Vol 306, Issue 5694, 247-252, 8 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1102612].2Chien, Moretti and Laugwitz, “ES Cells to the Rescue,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5694, 239-240, 8 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1104769].Big Science wants ES stem cell funding, and they jump on any tentative success with excitement unwarranted by the facts.  If the ES cells do not differentiate, and only treat an prenatal condition that otherwise would be fatal, then they not only hold promise for living children or adults, but instead provide a reason for not aborting the embryo, because the stem cells might save it.  Would the political liberals who support ES stem cell research want that?    In tonight’s second presidential debate, John Kerry dodged questions on both of these moral issues.  In one case, he was asked point blank why, if adult stem cells already show success, we need embryonic stem cell research (see article on WorldNetDaily).  He patronized the questioner with phony compassion about the deep moral convictions that motivated her question, then proceeded to ignore it.  The only reason he gave for supporting federal funds for ES stem cell research was that Big Science says it wants it, and he wants to be a president that supports “science”  (see 08/11/2004 editorial).  President Bush, in rebuttal, reiterated the principle that guided his difficult decision on stem cells: a life should not be created to be destroyed, even to assist another life (see 09/03/2004 headline).    In another case, a questioner asked what Kerry would say to a voter who did not want her tax dollars used to support abortion.  Again, he patronized the questioner but dodged the question.  He said although he personally disliked abortion because he is Catholic, he cannot as a legislator impose his moral values on others.  That was not what she asked.  She asked why others’ moral values should be used to force her to pay her tax dollars on something that violates her moral values.  For the questions Kerry should face without bluffing or dodging, read this article by Steven Ertelt on on LifeNews.com    Kerry also dodged the issue of his vote against the partial-birth abortion ban (six times), passed by both houses of Congress and signed by the President, but overruled by a federal judge.  He said he had to oppose it, because it did not contain a provision for the life of the mother, in spite of the fact that the carefully-worded law specifically made that provision (see ACLJ website for documentation and history of the bill).  The claim that the bill needed a provision for the “health of the mother” is a huge loophole.  Health could mean anything – mental health, hangnails or a cold – and there is never a health reason for the grisly practice of sucking the brains out of a baby halfway born.    So this is the kind of “science-friendly” president the liberals are promoting, for less than moral reasons (see 09/27/2004 headline).  Science and baloney do not go together.  They are supposed to be opposites.(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Energy Efficiency Incentives Need Updating

first_imgA broad coalition representing millions of Americans earlier this month urged Congress to modernize and extend expired energy efficiency tax incentives, touting the enormous, long-term benefits for both the industry and U.S. consumers. The coalition is comprised of environmental and efficiency groups, including the Natural Resources Defense Council, alongside leading manufacturers of windows, air conditioners, insulation, and other efficiency components that generate a significant number of U.S. jobs. (In total, energy efficiency supports 2.3 million U.S. workers.) Energy efficiency is generally considered the most effective solution for addressing climate change. But as the letter addressed to House and Senate leaders points out, three efficiency incentives expired on Dec. 31, 2017, leaving the tax code without any direct inducements to cut energy waste.RELATED ARTICLES‘All New Construction and Retrofits Must Be Carbon-Neutral’‘Always On’ Electronics and Appliances Waste BillionsA Fight Ahead For Solar Equipment Tax CreditsA (Potentially) Stronger Weatherization StimulusA Big Plan for Energy Retrofits in New York Meanwhile these incentives, as originally written, are outdated. They reference older building codes or efficiency thresholds, and offer dollar amounts that don’t reflect the current market prices for building technologies and high-efficiency equipment, the letter notes. For example, the incentive to buy a high-efficiency air conditioning system is capped at $300, which isn’t enough to meaningfully affect purchasing decisions on equipment and installation that often runs $10,000 or more. However, the letter says, this “glaring and urgent omission” also represents a golden, bipartisan opportunity. Not only would implementing efficiency credits significantly lower carbon emissions, it would also reduce energy costs for consumers, stimulate job creation, and promote economic opportunity. Tax credits have a proven track record of driving clean energy investments at minimal cost to taxpayers, so lawmakers should be eager to get on board. But because tax incentives have repeatedly expired and been reinstated, consumers, manufacturers, and contractors have found themselves uncertain about their availability, and unable to plan upgrades to the energy efficiency of their buildings accordingly. Thus, the letter also urges Congress to pass a “forward-looking, multi-year extension” that would offer a sense of security to get the most of out of the incentives. The letter calls for increased maximum credits for both new home construction under the Section 45L Energy Efficient Home Credit, as well as homeowner efficiency improvements under the Section 25C Nonbusiness Energy Property Credit for existing homes. It also supports a “modernized, forward-looking, multi-year extension” of the Section 179D incentive for commercial building efficiency improvements. Acting now will cut energy waste for decades Homes and buildings constructed or renovated today will still be in use 50 or 100 years from now; energy-intensive equipment like air conditioners and furnaces will be used for a decade or longer. Because the residential and commercial sector accounts for 40% of U.S. energy consumption, failing to update these incentives now guarantees unnecessary energy waste and carbon emissions for many decades to come. Improved efficiency, on the other hand, will save businesses and consumers hundreds of millions of dollars annually on energy bills, reduce the demand on the utility grid, and make the U.S. more economically competitive. The letter makes note of evidence showing that incentives are utilized more when they are set at meaningful dollar amounts. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, efficiency incentives for home improvements were increased, and nearly 7 million taxpayers claimed them in 2010. In the following years, that number fell to just 2.2 million in 2015, after the incentives dropped to pre-stimulus levels. Proposed changes Previously, the 45L Energy Efficient Home Credit provided builders up to $2,000 for homes that use 50% less energy than 2006 building codes for heating and cooling and a $1,000 tax credit for new manufactured homes that achieved 30% energy savings for heating and cooling or met Energy Star requirements. The proposed increase supported by the group would raise the maximum credit to $2,500 for new homes that meet requirements. Since 45L was enacted in 2005, the number of homes that qualified by using 30% to 50% less energy on heating and cooling rose from less than 1% to around 11%. Similarly, the 25C incentive previously provided a 10% tax credit for the purchase of certain nonbusiness energy-efficient measures up to $500. In 2015, more than $1.6 billion in tax credits were claimed by homeowners who invested in clean energy improvements, with over two-thirds of the benefits going to households with gross incomes under $100,000. The new proposal would raise incentives to provide a 15% tax credit up to $1,200, and also see some individual product category caps eliminated or raised, which would allow homeowners to do multiple projects. Efficiency tax incentives are especially crucial now, as the Trump administration continues its push for more climate-polluting fossil fuels while attempting to undermine the excellent and important progress on energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency reports that efficiency alone can account for at least 40% of the emissions reductions needed to meet global targets. Restoring and improving these incentives offers a bipartisan opportunity that would accomplish goals across the board. Lauren Urbanek is senior energy policy advocate in the Climate & Clean Energy Program of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Republished with permission from the NRDC.last_img read more

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This Should Be Keeping You Up At Night

first_imgIt’s okay to ask your client the question, “What’s keeping you up at night?” It’s not the most powerful question you might ask. It assumes your client is concerned about something they don’t know how to resolve themselves.Two things are generally true right now. First, if your client was worried about something to the point they can’t sleep, they’d be doing something about it. Second, you wouldn’t likely be the first salesperson to try to discover the source of their dissatisfaction in hopes of making a sale.In this case, a statement is better than a question. That statement is this: “This is what should be keeping you up at night!”Keeping You Up At NightOne of the most difficult challenges for sales people and sales organizations today is developing dormant dissatisfaction. It’s tough to move your dream client to the point that they are compelled to change. If they knew that the status quo were untenable and believed they could do something about it, then your prospective dream client would already be making changes, wouldn’t they?If your prospects knew they needed to change and how to do it, you wouldn’t have a difficult time gaining an appointment. And you wouldn’t have a difficult time creating a new opportunity. But these things are difficult to do, especially in a complex, business-to-business setting.If you want your client to be compelled to act, discover what should already be compelling.What are the trends that are going to have the biggest impact on your dream client’s business in the next couple of years?What are the challenges they are almost certain to face? What are the root causes of those challenges, and how should your clients be addressing those challenges now?What are the opportunities that your dream clients are going to use to create new opportunities that your prospects could benefit from were they to act?These are the things that should be keeping your prospective clients up at night. If you wait for them to discover these things for themselves, you may allow them to be harmed by their lack of insight or inaction. This makes you reactive. If you get in front of these issues and trends and help your clients do something about them, you are proactive. Your choice here defines you as a salesperson, or as a strategic partner, trusted advisor, consultative salesperson, or consigliere.last_img read more

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States lose push to force Trump to restart health subsidies

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – A U.S. judge on Wednesday rejected a request from 18 states and the District of Columbia to force the Trump administration to resume paying “Obamacare” subsidies right away and scolded the coalition for claiming health care costs would rise without federal help.State attorneys general, all Democrats and led by Xavier Becerra of California, argued that the monthly payments are required under former President Barack Obama’s health care law and cutting them off will harm consumers. The payments reimburse insurers for providing lower-income people with discounts on out-of-pocket costs.U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria, an Obama appointee, said the states had devised workarounds to the lost subsidies that would give millions of lower-income people even better health care options.That means the emergency order the states sought would be “counterproductive,” the judge said.The states should stop “yelling about higher premiums” and “focus instead on communicating the message that they have devised a response … that will prevent harm to the large majority of people while in fact allowing millions of lower-income people to get a better deal on health insurance in 2018,” Chhabria said.The states had asked Chhabria to order the government to keep making the payments while their lawsuit works its way through the courts, which will take months. Becerra said he will continue to press the case.“The fight for affordable health care moves forward,” he said in a statement after the ruling. “The actions by the Trump Administration undermine critical payments that keep costs of health care affordable for working families.”President Donald Trump announced earlier this month that he will cut off the payments, saying Obama’s law is imploding and criticizing the subsidies as insurance company bailouts. The White House says the government cannot legally continue paying them because there is no formal authorization from Congress.The judge said in his ruling that the Trump administration had the stronger legal argument, though he cautioned that the question of whether Congress had permanently set aside money for the subsidies was “close and complicated.”Chhabria hammered an attorney for the state of California at a hearing this week over how the change would affect consumers.Gregory Brown, who represented California, said the decision was creating “uncertainty and chaos” that could lead insurance companies to opt out of the health law. Brown also said it would “spook consumers.”Chhabria wasn’t buying the argument. He said California and other states had anticipated the subsidies would end and found a way to ensure consumers would not pay more for insurance.The states limited the plans for which insurers could hike premiums and ensured that many people will get more tax credits for their health insurance purchases, the judge said.In his ruling, Chhabria cited an October press release by California’s health care marketplace, which said the premiums of nearly four of five consumers will stay the same or decrease after surcharges tied to the lost subsidies are factored in. The judge said dozens of other states also have accounted for the end of the subsidies.The payments reimburse insurers for the costs of lowering copays and deductibles, which they are required to do for low-income customers who buy coverage through the health care marketplaces created by Obama’s law.The states joining California in the lawsuit are: Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Washington, along with the District of Columbia.last_img read more

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Snowfall warnings remain in place and expand into Alberta and Fort Nelson

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The snowfall warning issued Friday for the B.C. Peace and Pine Pass remains in place, but has also been expanded into Alberta and Fort Nelson.Fort St. John and the rest of the B.C. Peace is expected to see heavy snow today with total amounts ranging from 10 to 15 cm.A low-pressure system will cross the region today. Heavy snow is expected to develop early this morning.  The wind will gust up to 60km/h Saturday afternoon causing temperatures to feel more like minus 26. Fort Nelson is expected to receive 5 cm today as the heavy amounts remain to the south. The snow will ease this afternoon as the low moves into Alberta.The Pine Pass could see up to 25 cm of snow.Before you head out on area highways, visit www.drivebc.ca or 511.alberta.ca for current road conditions and highway cameras.For more information on weather warnings where you live, click here.last_img read more

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Ohio State womens soccer advances to 2nd round in doubleovertime victory over

OSU sophomore forward Sammy Edwards (19) during a game against Minnesota on Sept. 17 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Sam Harris / For The LanternOhio State women’s soccer forward Sammy Edwards had been searching for her chance all night at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in the first round of the NCAA tournament. The sophomore came out firing on Saturday night against the Butler Bulldogs, but her game-high three first-half shot attempts all came up short.Frustration was building up, but Edwards would finally get her shot at redemption, even if it came after nearly 107 minutes of playing time. In the second overtime, Edwards pushed the frustration to the back of her mind and the net, sending her team to the second round with a goal in the 107th minute for the 2-1 victory.“As (the players’) frustration was going up, they had to get their communication higher and just continue to press and believe that the more opportunities we create, one of them has got to fall,” OSU coach Lori Walker said.OSU (12-6-3) immediately went on the offensive as soon as the game commenced, eager for a postseason victory. Buckeye junior forward Lindsey Agnew attempted the team’s first shot in the 13th minute off of a Nichelle Prince corner kick. Agnew’s shot was blocked, but Edwards countered with an attempt from 12 yards which sailed just over the top of the goalpost.“To have that kind of possession and to have the opportunities we did in the first half and then not feel like we converted, it’s very easy to fall into a level of frustration,” Walker said.The Buckeyes contained the game to Butler’s (16-7-1) side of the field for a majority of the first half. Prince continued to create shots on goal with her heads-up crosses to her forward counterparts. Edwards also had another early opportunity at breaking the deadlock, but she missed over the top on a volley from eight yards out.It was the relentless three-headed attack consisting of Prince, Agnew and Edwards that continually pushed the Buckeyes downfield. The selfish style of play by Prince, who led the Buckeyes with 77 shot attempts entering the tournament, kept the home team on track despite the threat of frustration building up.Both the Buckeyes and the Bulldogs had opportunities to enter halftime with a lead. Strikes on goal by OSU senior midfielder Michela Paradiso at the 35th minute and Butler sophomore defender Maria Collica at the 37th minute nearly changed the course of the game. The Buckeyes took an 8-5 shot lead into the half, although Butler held a slight 2-1 edge with shots on goal.“I was just beating myself up over the misses in the first half, but I didn’t let it get to my head too much,” Edwards said.Although OSU seemed in control throughout the first 45 minutes of play, Butler opened the half with the same aggression that the Buckeyes began the contest with. The OSU women did not fold, answering with a few subsequent trips downfield that nearly resulted in scores.Prince decided to get in on the assertive Buckeye action after playing the distributor role in the first half, attempting shots from six and eight yards out at the 52nd and 62nd minute marks, respectively. However, OSU continued to be inches away from moving the scoreboard.It was not until redshirt junior defender Morgan Wolcott, who had entered Saturday’s game having taken just two shots on goal for the season, recorded possibly the most important goal of her career. Wolcott broke the nil-nil game in the 86th minute with a tap that pushed the ball just inside the right post.“To get a goal that helps us advance further in the NCAAs is big time,” Wolcott said.Minutes later, the energy was almost completely taken out of the Buckeye women. Seconds away from moving on to the second round, Butler senior midfielder Sophia Maccagnone squeezed a free kick just past OSU redshirt junior goalie Jillian McVicker inside the right post.“It’s just similar to our entire season,” Maccagnone said. “We don’t want to stop fighting.”Thinking that they were about to capture the most important victory of the season, the Buckeyes would need to come together on the field and in their minds to prevent Butler from stealing a win.“We kind of all just took a deep breath and reengaged in what we had to do,” Edwards said. “We have been through so much adversity, so just throwing that at us is just another thing we can handle.”That opportunity came in the second overtime when Edwards followed up a miss at the 103rd minute with the game-winner with less than four minutes to go in the final extra period.“I’m very proud of my team and the energy they found in overtime to find a way to win,” Walker said. “We’ve certainly been in overtime many times this year, and I think that gave us a little confidence to get the job done.”The Buckeyes are next scheduled to play the fourth-seeded Virginia Tech Hokies (15-3-2) in the second round of the NCAA tournament on Friday at 3 p.m. in State College, Pennsylvania. read more

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