New York state surpasses 1,000 coronavirus deaths

first_imgThe virus has torn through New York City and its suburbs with frightening speed. Most of the deaths have happened in a span of just a few days. New York City reported in the evening that its toll had risen to 776. The total number of statewide deaths isn’t expected to be released until Monday. But with at least 250 additional deaths recorded outside the city as of Sunday morning, the state’s total fatalities was at least 1,026. NEW YORK (AP) — New York has surpassed 1,000 deaths from the coronavirus outbreak, less than a month after the first case was detected in the state. read more

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Falcao blow for United

first_imgLouis van Gaal’s selection problems deepened on Thursday after it emerged Manchester United striker Radamel Falcao will be out for at least a fortnight because of a new injury. Van Gaal said initial tests on the player’s left knee proved inconclusive and he will undergo another scan the week after next to determine how long he would be out for. The United boss said: “He has a brace on his knee and 10 days’ rest and then we have to make another scan and then we can say more about his injury. “It is not so bad as the doctor thought after the match but it shall be a long story, I believe, but not six months or something like that. Blind was one of five United players injured on international duty. Luke Shaw felt a tight hamstring and groin while away with England. “Shaw is a question mark,” Van Gaal added. Michael Carrick also suffered a groin problem on international duty, and he will be assessed before Van Gaal decides whether to include the player in the squad for the game at the Emirates. “I have to wait for how he reacts in training, but I expect that he is also ready to play,” Van Gaal said. There was better news about Angel di Maria and David de Gea, who suffered foot and finger injuries while away with Argentina and Spain respectively. “Di Maria has trained today normally so I don’t think that is a question mark,” Van Gaal said. “David De Gea is good, no problem.” Van Gaal’s squad was already hit by injuries to key players before the international break. Phil Jones, Marcos Rojo, Jonny Evans, Rafael and Radamel Falcao all missed the 1-0 win over Crystal Palace two weeks ago, and it looks like they will miss Saturday’s game against the Gunners too. When asked whether any player who missed the Palace match was available for this weekend, Van Gaal seemed to suggest it would be highly unlikely. “It’s difficult to say if anyone is back because we have to wait for tomorrow’s training session to decide if players are coming back,” he said. “But the players are not coming back in the squad – that’s a different thing. My philosophy is that you have to train at least one week with the squad, but better two.” Danny Welbeck will face his boyhood club for the first time on Saturday since his £16million move. Welbeck has scored 10 goals for Arsenal and England since leaving Old Trafford. Van Gaal, who said in September that he sold Welbeck because of his poor scoring record, thinks the 23-year-old is benefittng from an extended run of first-team matches at his new club. “I think that a player always who is playing mostly fixed in a team, he develops always better,” he said. “So he takes all the benefit that he plays every week. That was a question mark with Manchester United. So it’s very good to see him doing what I thought.” Falcao has had a difficult start to life at the club since his dramatic deadline-day loan move from Monaco. The 28-year-old, who is among the top earners at Old Trafford, has scored only one goal so far and he is yet to play 90 minutes for the Red Devils. Falcao has not played for United for a month because of a calf problem and he has now suffered another setback, the club confirmed on Thursday afternoon. “Van Gaal tells #MUTV that @Falcao “has a new injury” and is at least two weeks away from a first-team return. #mufc,” a post from the United’s official Twitter account read. “I am getting better, I feel well and I hope to come back to the pitch soon,” Falcao told United’s website. “It is disappointing that I can’t play but I have to be calm and recover because that is important to help the team when I return to the games.” The Colombian frontman said reports that he was struggling for fitness because of a knee injury he suffered last season were “pure speculation”. Even if Falcao had been fit, Van Gaal would still be facing a severe shortage of players for Saturday’s crucial match against Arsenal. The Dutchman could be without seven players after a damaging international break. The biggest casualty was midfielder Daley Blind, who came off in the 20th minute of Holland’s 6-0 win over Latvia with a knee injury. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Zuma, Charlize Theron discuss HIV

first_img29 July 2013President Jacob Zuma met with Academy Award-winning actor and activist Charlize Theron in Pretoria on Monday. The two discussed South Africa’s response to HIV/Aids and Theron’s role in the fight against the disease.In 2008, the United Nations named South African-born Theron as its Messenger of Peace, tasked with promoting efforts to end violence against women.Following their meeting on Monday, Zuma said Theron’s UN humanitarian role continued to give South Africa’s fight against HIV a big boost.Representing South Africa“She has been a pillar of strength in promoting our programmes,” Zuma said. “Today has been a very special day with this good citizen of ours joining us, she is representing South Africa in many respects.“We believe the education of young people goes a long way to prevent any escalation of the disease. That’s what Charlize has been doing,” Zuma said.Flanked by Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi and UNAids executive director Michel Sidibe, Zuma said South Africa could play a leading role in the fight against HIV on the continent.“We believe the successes we make in South Africa will have a big impact on the continent.”HIV prevention: ‘keep conversation going’Theron urged youngsters in South Africa not to stop the conversation on HIV prevention.“We can never stop talking about this disease,” she said. “If we don’t feel safe in our environment to talk about it, we cannot combat it. We have to create the environment through which the youth of South Africa can talk about this and ask any question.“It’s always very special to return home and when I’m able to lend my support,” Theron added. “We have come so far in this country with our HIV programme. We have the highest number of people who are on HIV treatment, but we still have challenges … Young girls should be empowered enough to protect themselves … The school environment should be safe for that to happen.”Motsoaledi said that since South Africa’s new voluntary counselling and testing campaign was launched in 2010, the stigma surrounding the virus in the country had dropped dramatically.“You can go to any clinic. People are no longer ashamed to say, ‘I’m on ARVs’.”Africa Outreach ProjectTheron is recognised for her grassroots work focusing on social issues, particularly in South Africa, where she helps to drive the Africa Outreach Project, which provides funding for a mobile health and computer clinic that visits high schools in rural communities affected by HIV/Aids.The project has provided about 5 000 students in remote communities with access to counselling and testing for HIV and other health issues, as well as computer training and health education, with a special focus on preventing HIV.Theron has also participated in a series of public service announcements in support of the Cape Town Rape Crisis Centre, urging no tolerance for rape and domestic violence.Theron won the 2004 Oscar for best actress for her role in the Hollywood drama Monster, in which she played Aileen Wuornos, a serial killer whose youth was characterized by abuse.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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South Africa’s role in clean energy discussed at Mining Indaba

first_imgProduction will start at South Africa’s first fuel cell component plant by December, it was announced at the Investing in African Mining Indaba. Fuel cells use platinum, and the country is the world’s leading platinum producer.Production will start at South Africa’s first fuel cell component plant by December 2017. The plant will have a role to play in making clean energy vehicles. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterFuel cell components and using platinum as a catalyst was one of the hot topics at the Investing in African Mining Indaba this week. The annual conference took place from 6-9 February 2017 at the Cape Town International Convention Centre.The indaba is dedicated to the capitalisation and development of mining interests in Africa. It was announced during the conference that production would begin at Africa’s first fuel cell component plant by December.What are fuel cells?Fuel cells are eco-friendly; use hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuel, such as natural gas, biogas, and methanol, and oxygen; and they reduce harmful emissions.Fuel cells also generate electricity and heat from the electrochemical reaction between hydrogen, platinum and oxygen.The fuel cell component plantAfrica’s first fuel cell component plant using platinum as a catalyst would start production by December this year, Reuters reported.The announcement comes after Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies launched a R15-million feasibility study a year ago. The Isondo Precious Minerals study is to identify particular components that can be manufactured for fuel cell units.It was intended to accelerate mineral beneficiation and localisation of fuel cell manufacturing in South Africa.The fuel cell component plant – a first in Africa – aimed to take advantage of rising demand for clean energy cars, said officials from Isondo Precious Metals.The group has secured a licence from the American company Chemours Technology to gather components for fuel cells using platinum, which has mainly been used in catalysts to clean up car emissions.The new plant will be located in a special economic zone either in Johannesburg or Durban.Fuel cell activity in South Africa:A hydrogen economyThe organisations partnering in fuel cell technology are HySA Catalysis, HySA Systems and HySA Infrastructure. They all fall under HySA (Hydrogen South Africa). HySA was initiated by the Department of Science and Technology, in its research, development and innovation strategy. It was launched in 2008.HySA Catalysis is co-hosted by the University of Cape Town and Mintek; HySA Systems is hosted by the University of the Western Cape; and HySA Infrastructure is hosted by North West University and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research.The parent company’s focus areas include the use and displacement of strategic minerals, and ways of harnessing South Africa’s mineral endowments to promote the hydrogen economy and renewable energy use.HyPlat is a spinoff company of HySA Catalysis. “Essentially HyPlat is a success story of HySA Catalysis. The technologies developed by HySA Catalysis have been licensed to HyPlat making HyPlat the commercialisation arm of HySA Catalysis,” said HyPlat’s chief executive officer, Dr. Sharon Blair.“HyPlat sells customised platinum-based fuel cell components in South Africa. These products are sold to foreign customers and exported globally. South Africa has very little fuel cell activity; that’s why most of the customers are companies from abroad.”Structures that use fuel cellsIn the Chamber of Mines building, a 100kW fuel cell produces 70% of the organisation’s electricity. The fuel cell runs on platinum and natural gas.Explaining the use of South African platinum in the fuel cell, Chamber of Mines spokesperson Charmane Russel said: “The platinum used is the catalyst in an electrochemical process. The platinum is a once-off amount that is never used up.“However, after about 10 years, the platinum membrane becomes warped and it is then smelted and reapplied in the same fuel cell,” she said. “The platinum reacts with hydrogen to produce electricity – 35kW of heat and 5l of water per hour as a by-product.”The source of the hydrogen in the chamber’s fuel cell was low pressure natural gas, and it used 420GJ of gas a month, said Russel.Watch South Africa’s first hydrogen fuel cell forklift and refuelling station at work at Implats:The fuel cell forklift prototype and its refuelling station had been running since November 2015, said Fahmida Smith, the fuel cell co-ordinator at platinum group metals mining house Impala Platinum (Implats). “It’s operating very well.”South Africa’s first prototype hydrogen fuel cell forklift and refuelling station, it is installed at Impala Refining Services in Springs, Gauteng. Over the past three years, Implats has spent R6-million with HySA Systems in developing the prototype. The miner plans to use hydrogen fuel cell technology as its main source of energy for material handling and underground mining equipment.“We are looking at a wider industry collaboration on commercialisation of this. This is a very early stage and we still need to develop a formal commercialisation strategy,” said Smith.The fuel cell forklift was refuelled once a week, she explained. “Where this unit is different from a normal battery forklift is in its availability. A pure battery system can operate between four to six hours pending battery size and load.“It takes at least eight hours to recharge before it can be used again. The fuel cell forklift has a higher availability rate and takes less than 10 minutes to refuel.”Investments in fuel cell vehiclesAnglo American Platinum was investing $4-million (R53.764m) to help reduce the delivered costs of hydrogen, the mining company said on its website. The investment promised to support the development of hydrogen refuelling stations for fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) in the north-east corridor of the United States.FCEVs are powered by hydrogen and have the potential to revolutionise transport. FCEVs are fuelled with pure hydrogen gas stored directly on the vehicle. They will only produce water and heat.Furthermore, the mining house’s investment in United Hydrogen Group, a hydrogen production and distribution business in the United States, was aimed at bolstering the demand for platinum, it said.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

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TNT acquires Onwubere as Phoenix makes moves

first_imgStronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Next QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Sidney Onwubere was picked eighth in the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netTNT continued to retool in preparation for the upcoming season as it is set to acquire versatile rookie Sidney Onwubere from Phoenix.Sources close to the situation confirmed that the 23-year-old, who was picked eighth overall in the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft, was shipped to the KaTropa in exchange for Jon Gabriel and Justin Chua from the Fuel Masters.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Fernandez knows ‘underdog’ San Beda will come out big vs Lyceum LATEST STORIES Onwubere will be a welcome addition for TNT as coach Nash Racela will have the luxury of trotting out the hardworking Fil-Nigerian out of Emilio Aguinaldo College this coming season.Meanwhile, Gabriel, the 11th overall pick in the recent rookie selection, and seldom-used Chua will both be banked on to reinforce Phoenix’s lean frontline.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Fuel Masters also continued to make moves in the offseason, trading big man Michael Miranda to the rebuilding NLEX.In exchange, the Road Warriors sent TNT’s 2018 second round pick in the deal. MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

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Dharun eyes medal at Asian Championships

first_imgBy Amit Kumar Das New Delhi, Sep 5 (PTI) Brimming with confidence after winning a silver at the Asian Games, India’s 400m hurdler Dharun Ayyasamy has set his eyes on winning a medal at the Asian Championships next year. “My next immediate target is to win a medal at Asian championship. I don’t know what medal it would be but I’m confident of returning with a medal. Also there is World Championship (also in Qatar) and I want to do well in that also,” said Dharun who had clocked 48.96 seconds in Jakarta. “I am targeting 48.50 next year. If I can do that and keep improving and produce 48.2 or 48.1 in 2020 Olympics, it will be good enough to get into the final. In track and field, getting into the final is a big achievement. So that is the target now,” said the 21-year-old, who hails from a village called Ravuthampalayam in Tiruppur district in Tamil Nadu. Dharun lost his father to tuberculosis when he was eight years old. He was in class IV then. It was his mother, a school teacher, who supported him and his sister, once a budding volleyball player, with a meagre salary of Rs 14,000. “I don’t know where I would have been if it was not for my mother. She always gave me the freedom to follow my dreams. I am trying for a job. Now I have a few offers from Army, Navy and Railways but nothing is confirmed yet,” said Dharun, a TY Human Resources student at Alva’s College of Arts at Moodabidri in Karnataka.advertisement Talking about his Asian Games silver, Dharun said: “After qualification round I felt confident. I was in second position. Before the final, I was targeting the bronze. I knew beating the Qatar runner will be difficult and also there was a Japanese who would run below 49 sec, but during the race I had a lot of energy and I managed to get silver.” Dharun, who represented his state in kho-kho before switching to athletics, burst onto the national scene when he won the 400m hurdles gold at the 2016 South Asian Games in Guwahati with a time of 50.54 seconds. He was a part of the Rio Olympics 4×400 relay team. His journey to Asian Games silver has been a tough one. “After the Olympics, I was injured for a year. It was a shin bone injury and then six months I had to go through rehabilitation. It was difficult to make a comeback,” said Dharun. Ahead of the Asian Games in May, Dharun was in Poland for a five-week training exposure tour but he injured himself there. “After reaching Poland, I had a hamstring injury after a week. I took rest for 10 days but there was still pain when I stated training. So I told my coach that I need to take 20 days rest and ran straight in competition,” said Dharun, who created a new meet record at the National Inter-State Athletics Championship in June in Guwahati. Dharun, who had broken Joseph Abraham’s 400m hurdles national record with a timing of 49.45 sec at the Federation Cup in March, also went for a training camp in Czech Republic. “Czech Republic was good for me as there was training and competition also. And European countries are suitable. We could work hard and recover also. I ran in 4-5 competition and executed a few things. That experience was good for me. It boosted my confidence as I went from Asian Games,” he said. The government felicitated the athletes with cash awards Tuesday night and Dharun said he wants to buy a sports bike for himself. “I want to buy a sports bike and keep a little for myself, rest I will give to my mother,” said Dharun, who is suffering from an infection below his left eye. PTI ATK PDSPDSlast_img read more

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Eldorado shares fall as it cuts production guidance at Kisladag mine in

first_imgTORONTO – Shares in Eldorado Gold Corp. fell more than 10 per cent in late-morning trading after the gold miner cut its guidance for gold production from its Kisladag mine in Turkey.The stock was down 49 cents or about 18 per cent at $2.24 on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The company says gold recovery from the leach pad at the operation has lagged internal expectations.Eldorado says it now expects production from Kisladag this year to be 170,000 to 180,000 ounces at cash costs of $500 to $550 per ounce. It also placed its guidance for 2018 and beyond under review.The revised guidance was down from an estimate of 180,000 to 210,000 ounces in June and the company’s original 2017 guidance for 230,000 to 245,000 ounces.Eldorado, which has operations in Turkey, Greece, Canada, Romania, Serbia and Brazil, calls Kisladag its flagship gold mine.last_img read more

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NTSB El Faro probe highlights maritime safety issues

first_imgWhile fateful decisions made by the captain of the doomed freighter El Faro were instrumental in the ship’s sinking, federal investigators spread plenty of blame around and highlighted multiple safety issues in the maritime industry that contributed to its demise.It was a confluence of factors that contributed to the sinking of the El Faro in the fury of Hurricane Joaquin on Oct. 1, 2015, which killed all 33 people on board, the National Transportation Safety Board announced. The report concluded a 2-year investigation into the worst U.S. maritime disaster in modern history.Among its findings the NTSB cited Tuesday the El Faro captain’s unwillingness to listen to his crew’s suggestions to change course from the path of a raging hurricane; a weak corporate safety culture that left crewmembers ill-prepared to deal with heavy weather. It also blamed an old ship with outdated lifeboats, open to the elements and a vessel inspection system that allowed older ships in poor condition to continue operating.The board issued 53 safety recommendations, which investigators hope will be adopted by the industry, maritime safety inspectors and weather forecasters to make the seas safer for future generations.The El Faro, which means “lighthouse” in Spanish, sank between Jacksonville, Florida, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, after losing engine power in the Category 3 storm. The NTSB retrieved the ship’s voyage data recorder, or “black box,” from the sea floor near the Bahamas, 15,000-feet (4,570 metres) under the surface. The device held 26 hours of data, including audio of conversations on the ship’s bridge as the frantic crew struggled to save the ship and themselves.Larry Brennan, a maritime law professor at Fordham Law School and retired U.S. Navy captain, said the NTSB’s meeting highlighted major safety problems in the entire shipping industry, including the Coast Guard and so-called “classification societies” like the American Bureau of Shipping, or ABS, that are in charge of inspecting vessels for safety.“El Faro was a worn, aged ship which succumbed to heavy weather in large part because of multiple unseaworthy conditions, poor leadership and bad decisions by the captain, ABS, the owners as well as inadequate surveys and inspections by the U.S. Coast Guard,” Brennan said.While the board found no fault with El Faro Capt. Michael Davidson’s decision to leave port in Jacksonville, they did blame his reliance on an emailed weather forecasting system that contained hours-old data, rather than online updates from the National Hurricane Center. Investigators believe, based on his decisions and recorded comments, that he wasn’t aware of the delay in the data and that instead of skirting the storm, he sent the El Faro on a collision course with the hurricane.“Although up-to-date weather information was available on the ship, the El Faro captain did not use the most current weather information for decision-making,” NTSB investigator Mike Kucharski said at the meeting, held in Washington, D.C.The board also criticized the “weak safety culture” of ship owner TOTE Maritime, Inc., including the lack of employee training for dealing with heavy weather situations and flooding. A hatch had been left open, allowing water from the roiling sea to flood an interior hold; this led to the ship tilting, disrupting the flow of oil to the engines. Once the freighter lost engine power, it was at the mercy of battering swells.In a statement, TOTE said it will study the NTSB and Coast Guard investigative reports thoroughly. “We as a company intend to learn everything possible from this accident and the resulting investigations to prevent anything similar from occurring in the future,” Darrell Wilson, a company spokesman, said.El Faro’s wind gauge, called an anemometer, was broken and the 40-year-old freighter’s open-top lifeboats would not have protected the crew, even if they had been able to launch them. The El Faro was legally allowed to carry lifeboats that expose people to the elements — just like the lifeboats on the Titanic and the Lusitania — due to safety-rule exemptions for older ships.Whether the crew could have survived Joaquin’s punishing winds and high seas had the El Faro been equipped with the closed-top lifeboats used by newer ships is unknown, but NTSB safety investigator Jon Furukawa said it could have helped crewmembers fighting for their lives.“We believe that would’ve been the best method of departing the vessel under these conditions. It is still challenging, and we don’t know if they would’ve survived,” Furukawa said.The board is not only recommending closed-top boats for all merchant ships, but also that the entire industry require crewmembers to carry personal locator beacons to better locate them during marine emergencies.The El Faro had an older emergency position-indicating radio beacon, or EPIRB, which did not transmit global position system co-ordinates, and that made locating the ship more difficult for search-and-rescue crews. Given the heavy weather, rescuers probably couldn’t have reached the ship any sooner, but the board believes the new requirement would help in future sea accidents.“I hope that this tragedy at sea can serve as a lighthouse to guide the safety of marine transportation,” said Robert Sumwalt, the board’s chairman.___Follow Jason Dearen on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/JHDearenlast_img read more

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Fort St John Schools taking part in Classroom Champions Program

first_img“During the holiday season, giving back is often top of mind. We are so thankful for the ongoing investment and generosity of PETRONAS Canada and our athletes as they continue to invest in helping local kids get better and better through the Classroom Champions program.”Canadian Olympic skeleton racer, Mirela Rahneva, is paired with four elementary schools in Fort St. John and Hudson’s Hope to virtually mentor students and to inspire them in areas like goal setting, perseverance, teamwork and giving back to the community.Over the past six years, Classroom Champions has mentored over 35,000 students across North America. Athletes use video lessons, live video chats and social media to develop social-emotional skills through Classroom Champions’ Scaled Mentorship program which makes a measurable difference with students, teachers, classrooms and mentors.For more information on this program, you can visit classroomchampions.org FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Classrooms from across Fort St. John are teaming up with elite athletes for the Classroom Champions Program.Classroom Championships, in partnership with PETRONAS Canada, is dedicated to partnering with teachers to connect low socio-economic students with world-class athlete mentors to support students in academic, social and emotional learning.Steve Mesler, Olympic Gold Medalist and Co-Founder & CEO of Classroom Champions, says he is grateful for the continued support from PETRONAS Canada and the athletes in providing this program to local school children.last_img read more

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Ohio State womens soccer advances to 2nd round in doubleovertime victory over

OSU sophomore forward Sammy Edwards (19) during a game against Minnesota on Sept. 17 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Sam Harris / For The LanternOhio State women’s soccer forward Sammy Edwards had been searching for her chance all night at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in the first round of the NCAA tournament. The sophomore came out firing on Saturday night against the Butler Bulldogs, but her game-high three first-half shot attempts all came up short.Frustration was building up, but Edwards would finally get her shot at redemption, even if it came after nearly 107 minutes of playing time. In the second overtime, Edwards pushed the frustration to the back of her mind and the net, sending her team to the second round with a goal in the 107th minute for the 2-1 victory.“As (the players’) frustration was going up, they had to get their communication higher and just continue to press and believe that the more opportunities we create, one of them has got to fall,” OSU coach Lori Walker said.OSU (12-6-3) immediately went on the offensive as soon as the game commenced, eager for a postseason victory. Buckeye junior forward Lindsey Agnew attempted the team’s first shot in the 13th minute off of a Nichelle Prince corner kick. Agnew’s shot was blocked, but Edwards countered with an attempt from 12 yards which sailed just over the top of the goalpost.“To have that kind of possession and to have the opportunities we did in the first half and then not feel like we converted, it’s very easy to fall into a level of frustration,” Walker said.The Buckeyes contained the game to Butler’s (16-7-1) side of the field for a majority of the first half. Prince continued to create shots on goal with her heads-up crosses to her forward counterparts. Edwards also had another early opportunity at breaking the deadlock, but she missed over the top on a volley from eight yards out.It was the relentless three-headed attack consisting of Prince, Agnew and Edwards that continually pushed the Buckeyes downfield. The selfish style of play by Prince, who led the Buckeyes with 77 shot attempts entering the tournament, kept the home team on track despite the threat of frustration building up.Both the Buckeyes and the Bulldogs had opportunities to enter halftime with a lead. Strikes on goal by OSU senior midfielder Michela Paradiso at the 35th minute and Butler sophomore defender Maria Collica at the 37th minute nearly changed the course of the game. The Buckeyes took an 8-5 shot lead into the half, although Butler held a slight 2-1 edge with shots on goal.“I was just beating myself up over the misses in the first half, but I didn’t let it get to my head too much,” Edwards said.Although OSU seemed in control throughout the first 45 minutes of play, Butler opened the half with the same aggression that the Buckeyes began the contest with. The OSU women did not fold, answering with a few subsequent trips downfield that nearly resulted in scores.Prince decided to get in on the assertive Buckeye action after playing the distributor role in the first half, attempting shots from six and eight yards out at the 52nd and 62nd minute marks, respectively. However, OSU continued to be inches away from moving the scoreboard.It was not until redshirt junior defender Morgan Wolcott, who had entered Saturday’s game having taken just two shots on goal for the season, recorded possibly the most important goal of her career. Wolcott broke the nil-nil game in the 86th minute with a tap that pushed the ball just inside the right post.“To get a goal that helps us advance further in the NCAAs is big time,” Wolcott said.Minutes later, the energy was almost completely taken out of the Buckeye women. Seconds away from moving on to the second round, Butler senior midfielder Sophia Maccagnone squeezed a free kick just past OSU redshirt junior goalie Jillian McVicker inside the right post.“It’s just similar to our entire season,” Maccagnone said. “We don’t want to stop fighting.”Thinking that they were about to capture the most important victory of the season, the Buckeyes would need to come together on the field and in their minds to prevent Butler from stealing a win.“We kind of all just took a deep breath and reengaged in what we had to do,” Edwards said. “We have been through so much adversity, so just throwing that at us is just another thing we can handle.”That opportunity came in the second overtime when Edwards followed up a miss at the 103rd minute with the game-winner with less than four minutes to go in the final extra period.“I’m very proud of my team and the energy they found in overtime to find a way to win,” Walker said. “We’ve certainly been in overtime many times this year, and I think that gave us a little confidence to get the job done.”The Buckeyes are next scheduled to play the fourth-seeded Virginia Tech Hokies (15-3-2) in the second round of the NCAA tournament on Friday at 3 p.m. in State College, Pennsylvania. read more

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