Office conversions help drive auction to highs not seen since banking crisis

first_imgLeading auction house Allsop says its most recent auction raised £71m, the highest for a September event since the financial crisis hit in 2008.The record breaking event was helped – it says – by enthusiasm among bidders for offices with permitted development rights (PDR) for conversion to residential use.“The impact of the recent extension of PDR to the light industrial sector will be interesting,” Gary Murphy, Partner and Auctioneer at Allsop (pictured, right).“We expect to be offering an even broader choice to developers at forthcoming sales. Watch this space.”This month’s event, which took place on 14th September at The Cumberland Hotel in London’s Mayfair, featured 240 lots 13 of which were sold after the auction, 25 sold prior and 40 withdrawn.The auction, which ranged from a £3.2m investment property in Brighton to a £3,000 vacant freehold site in Stafford, raised £12m more than Allsopp’s September event last year.The £3.2 million investment property was an office building (pictured, left) offered with PDR conversion to 17 flats, which had a guide price of £2.5m.But Allsopp says the highlight of the day was a house offered by Devon & Cornwall Housing Association with a guide price of £625,000 in St Ives, but that went on to achieve £1.44m.The unmodernised, three-bedroom property (pictured, right) overlooks Porthmeor Beach and was listed as a potential ‘holiday let’.“Despite all that’s been thrown in the path of buyers over the past year, the market is anything but inactive,” says Gary.“We’re experiencing some very healthy competition in our rooms and it’s encouraging to see that bidders are not shy of the higher value lots.“At each successive Allsop sale, the multi-million-pound stock is emerging as the biggest crowd puller. As ever, our challenge is to match reserves to buyer sentiment. But get that right and the sky’s the limit.”“Permitted development has been a very active area for us” said Murphy. “Our buyer base has been extremely receptive to office to residential opportunities.”Gary Murphy Allsop September 21, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Office conversions help drive auction to highs not seen since banking crisis previous nextOffice conversions help drive auction to highs not seen since banking crisisAuctioneer Allsop says its latest day clearing 240 lots at The Cumberland Hotel saw £71m raise, the highest amount since 2008.Nigel Lewis21st September 20170493 Viewslast_img read more

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Press release: Homes England reveals ambitious pipeline of development opportunities

first_imgThe government’s national housing agency today publishes its latest Land Development and Disposal Plan, which details the nationwide portfolio of sites it plans to market for development.For the first time an interactive map is available alongside the Development and Disposal plan allowing users to identify sites geographically and to view site-level details, including red-line plans, online.To support its ambitious disposal plans, Homes England will provide improved technical packs and site information as well as a standard Building Lease to ensure a consistent approach across the country. These will incorporate clear approaches to the pace of build-out, Modern Methods of Construction, design and quality of place and tenure mix.Stephen Kinsella, Executive Director – Land at Homes England, said:“As part of Homes England’s expanded remit, we will be much more active in the land market, using our increased resources to ramp up the acquisition of land opportunities and developing new ways to partner other government departments to bring forward more sites more quickly. We are ambitious about our disposals for the year ahead so we’re really keen to talk to developers about the opportunities in our latest plan.”The publication of the Land Development and Disposal Plan follows the news that Homes England is launching a new framework that will help speed up the delivery of new homes, which will be in place in the autumn. The procurement of a new Multidisciplinary and Technical Services Frameworks will broaden the technical and design services available to support Homes England and other public bodies to accelerate the supply of new homes, with the frameworks providing direct access to the professional, technical and design services needed to prepare land for housing development.Sites listed in the Land Development and Disposal Plan will be disposed of on a competitive basis through Homes England’s Delivery Partner Panel (DPP3), through a private treaty sale, bespoke OJEU process or auction.EndsFor further media information, contact Patsy Cusworth – [email protected] Tel: 079677 2328Notes to EditorsHomes England is the new housing delivery organisation that has been created to adopt a more commercial approach to respond to the long term housing challenges facing this country. The new, expanded agency will play a far bigger role in investing in supply and intervening in the market to help deliver 300,000 homes a year by the middle of the next decade.Homes England will act differently from its predecessor, bringing together money, land, expertise and planning and compulsory purchase powers to accelerate the supply of new homes and address affordability issues in areas of highest demand.For more information visit: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/homes-england.last_img read more

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Intelligent and Elastic Compute Will Drive Future Edge Innovations

first_imgHardware acceleration4G → 5G, programmable networksSD-WANWI-FI and cellular convergence (5G, CBRS) Future Edge Usage Models and Architectural Shifts:With the dramatic growth in data as well as edge devices, the current edge infrastructure doesn’t scale well for extreme collaboration environments in the future. The next generation usage models around real-time content sharing, gaming, AR/VR, autonomous vehicles, drones and robotics are driving highly collaborative environments where information will be stored, distributed and analyzed across the end devices and the network edge. For example, users watching a game or concert in a stadium want to share locally captured content in real-time with other users. Distributed consumers want to collaborate using online gaming combined with virtual reality (VR) capabilities. This will leverage peer-to-peer communication and embedded AR/VR capabilities in the client devices. Autonomous vehicles, drones and robotics will take the edge information processing and direct device-to-device communication to next level.The figures below show this evolution from today’s Edge-to-Cloud architecture to future Intelligent & Elastic Compute Architecture.Current Technology Enablers: Co-Author: Liam Quinn, SVP / Senior Fellow, Client Solutions Group, Dell TechnologiesImagine a framework where devices can share computing resources and services seamlessly with other devices and leverage programmable network capabilities to optimally analyze the data and deliver business outcomes. IoT, social media and new edge deployments enabled by 5G and AI/ML (Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning) are driving cloud applications to move to distributed edge. Future usage models will require new architectures that enable highly collaborative data processing environment with intelligent and fluid sharing of compute resources and mobility of applications across devices. We believe new architectures and rapid industry innovations are required to enable seamless collaboration and data sharing at the edge.Current Edge Use Cases and Technology InnovationsCurrent edge use cases are moving data processing closer to end devices. For example, content distribution moves data from cloud to edge and leverages content delivery networks (CDN)  for caching of content closer to the end users. IoT and social media use cases lead to consuming and generating data at the edge. This data is analyzed at the end devices or an edge-cloud to deliver the right outcome. Edge-cloud may be on-prem, a co-location facility or offered “as-a-Service” by a service provider. The use cases and deployment scenarios vary across industry verticals that includes home automation, ADAS, smart factories, retail, oil and gas, agriculture and enterprises.Growth in number of IoT devices, cost of data transport and mission critical use cases drove this shift to move processing of data from cloud to edge. The enabling technologies are summarized below.High-Performance Client Devices: Client devices have CPU cores and hardware acceleration capabilities to process data locally and execute ML inferencing models. New embedded sensors and sensor fusion is driving continuous improvement in intelligence, location and context-aware capabilities. This combined with AI/ML is creating client/edge ready and agile applications.Network Edge-Cloud: Cloud applications and data processing is moving to network-edge and edge-clouds to process data closer to end devices at lower latency. Improvements in compute performance/watt is enabling increased processing capabilities. Data management control planes have an important role in decision on where optimized data processing will occur.AI/ML and Accelerators: AI/ML frameworks and low-power hardware accelerators are emerging to enable inferencing at the edge, while compute intensive operations of training are performed at the centralized cloud. These accelerators are embedded in smart end devices and network edge platforms. The trained ML model is delivered at the edge to enable inferencing close to the point of data generation.5G Cellular Network: The emerging 5G network enables high speed wireless network pipes and lower latency for diverse workloads, leveraging existing and new spectrum. Virtualization of RAN (vRAN) enables radio processing to shift from custom devices at cell towers to standard x86 servers with hardware accelerators for aggregated RAN processing. It enables performance scaling for large number of micro-cells, seamless mobility and billions of end-devices.Network Slicing: The growth in number of edge applications and distribution of processing between cloud and edge is driving next level of innovation in network-slicing capabilities. This enables connectivity with guaranteed SLA between an end-device and a backend application. The application may be running at Telco network edge or in the cloud.Programmable Networks: Programmable networks are emerging to enable seamless mobility of users and re-configuration of network slices. They also enable moving an application seamlessly from cloud to edge, along with the associated networking and security services.SD-WAN: Software Defined WAN has emerged to enable edge to cloud connections with multiple quality of service options. Data is distributed across these WAN connections to deliver optimal application performance.Wi-Fi and Cellular Convergence: Requirements around seamless end-user mobility is driving innovation in Wi-Fi and cellular convergence with next generation Wi-Fi and Private-LTE / CBRS (Citizen Broadband Radio Spectrum). New Dell Edge devices with embedded sensors and smart antenna/radio switching are key elements to enabling this seamless experience based on workload applications and usage models.Dell Technologies is innovating in each of the above areas and collaborating with Telcos, Service Providers and Cloud providers to deliver critical capabilities to end users. The edge and data center infrastructures are designed to scale with smart client devices, high performance PowerEdge servers, Hyper Converged Infrastructure (HCI), and dense GPU Platforms.Dell Technologies recently announced innovations that highlight these capabilities:PowerEdge XE2420 servers offer dense compute and robust security for edge deployments.Modular Data Center Micro 415 brings data center to far-reaching and rugged environments.Dell EMC iDRAC9 software brings remote access for a uniform, more secure server management experience from the edge to the core to the cloud.Dell EMC Streaming Data Platform stores and analyzes edge data.Network Slicing Capabilities enable software on client devices to configure network slices all the way from user applications to network edge or cloud for guaranteed performance. Future Technology Enablers:AI-enabled elastic computeDevices with system on chips modules, micro-AIMulti-tenant network slicingDecentralized/trusted compute and data fabricIntelligent arbitration across peer-to-peer devices The future architecture will build on the capabilities of current high performance client devices, AI/ML, and network edge, but will also require a new range of innovations to deliver highly intelligent devices, elastic compute environment and decentralized storage infrastructure that adapts to demands of next generation workloads. There are various industry efforts underway to drive these innovations and Dell Technologies is developing solutions for AI-driven Elastic Compute.Intelligent Client Devices: Highly integrated “system-on-chip” modules are emerging that will serve as the building blocks in client and edge devices including wearables, video surveillance, industrial and automotive systems. These ASICs enable highly intelligent devices with right amount of compute, memory, storage and AI/ML capabilities. System-on-chip modules are integrating micro-AI and micro-Accelerators with software frameworks to enable ease of AI application development. These silicon, power advancements and software frameworks will enable an environment where device capabilities will be treated as virtual. Think of an “elastic model” where devices and network collaborate to deliver the experience requested by an end user, and it leverages collective capabilities across peer devices and network edge.Decentralized Data Fabric: Storage architecture will become decentralized enabling the end users and edge clouds to contribute storage capacity. The data will be distributed across locations based on geo-awareness, performance, security and regulatory policies (e.g. GDPR).Multi-tenant and Trusted Compute: Trusted computing frameworks are emerging to enable optimal placement of application execution and associated data. Processor vendors are embedding security features (e.g. Intel SGX, AMD SEV, ARM TrustZones) to create a trusted execution environment for applications in multi-tenant environments.Data Center Disaggregation and Memory Fabrics: Enterprise infrastructure is evolving to a disaggregated composable architecture where in CPU, memory, IO, accelerators are disaggregated using a memory-based fabric. This enables a software defined infrastructure where in compute nodes are dynamically composed to adapt to the workload needs. Some technology innovations in this area are GenZ and CXL for future memory fabrics, persistent memory (PMEM) for high speed storage and high-bandwidth memory (HBM) for future embedded memory.vRAN and Dynamic Network Programmability: vRAN (Virtual RAN) and programmable networks will evolve to enable guaranteed SLA on peer-to-peer connections across devices and applications.AI/ML driven Resource Optimization: The streaming telemetry from client and enterprise infrastructure will leverage distributed analytics for real time reconfiguration of infrastructure and applications.These technology innovations will enable a grid-like elastic compute environment. The opportunity is to make intelligent use of distributed resources, network transports and mobile connectivity to enable a collaborative environment, where in device capabilities and applications are treated as virtual entities and peer-to-peer architectures enable elastic composition of services. AI/ML will serve as the centralized brain to orchestrate applications across secured and distributed resources. Companies that lead this innovation will succeed in the next generation of AI-driven elastic and decentralized edge. Dell Technologies is driving these innovations across its solution offerings, industry standardization efforts and engaging with partners to both innovate and integrate technologies in Dell platforms.last_img read more

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Legends holds focus group for Saint Mary’s students

first_imgLegends of Notre Dame is a restaurant, bar and club that serves as a gathering place for the Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross communities. On March 8, the Legends marketing team held a focus group at Saint Mary’s for students to voice their opinions and concerns. Catherine Flatley, a Notre Dame junior and marketing research manager of Legends, is in charge of coordinating focus groups. “We try to get a better insight to specifically what students want to see at Legends,” Flatley said. “Focus groups and surveys are held for Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students so that we can find ways to better serve our customers’ needs.” By holding a Saint Mary’s focus group, Flatley hoped to learn how Saint Mary’s students looked at Legends differently from Notre Dame and Holy Cross students, she said. “By acknowledging the needs of the Saint Mary’s students, we will be able to modify the experiences they have at Legends to make it more enjoyable,” Flatley said. JoLynn Williams, Saint Mary’s senior and Legends’ branding manager, also assisted Flatley in holding the Saint Mary’s focus group. “I am the only Saint Mary’s student on the marketing team at Legends, so we felt that my presence in this focus group would be very important to maintaining our goals,” Williams said. “A big part of my job is to make sure we can extend the olive branch to Saint Mary’s students and remind them that while Legends is on Notre Dame’s campus, we cater to the whole community of students.” Over the past four years, Williams noticed there has only been one promotion driven by handing out flyers, as opposed to posting them in dorms, for a Legends event on Saint Mary’s campus. “There are usually three to four members of the marketing team on campus [Notre Dame] who hand out promotions for our events happening each weekend,” Williams said. “Saint Mary’s has not seen this much.” Williams said this type of promotion can help bring people to events. “The one time I saw this type of promotion for an event at Legends, it struck me so much that I actually went to the event and enjoyed myself,” Williams said. By holding the Saint Mary’s focus group, Flatley and Williams hoped to gain constructive criticism to make changes where needed. “We use more of guideline questions to steer our focus groups so that the participants have a chance to get the dialogue really flowing without being pushed in different directions,” Flatley said. “This is what leads to the constructive criticism, which is what we are looking for.” When building the focus group, the participants tended to be juniors and seniors, Flatley said. “The most common thing we heard was Legends being compared to other bars around town and the differences between Legends and other go to places in the community,” she said. To maintain the constant input from Saint Mary’s students, Williams hopes the marketing team at Legends will have at least one or two students from Saint Mary’s on future teams. “I know there have been Saint Mary’s students on the team in the past, but currently I am the only one on the marketing team,” Williams said. “It would be truly beneficial to maintain a working relationship between Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and Holy Cross students in the future.” Contact Jillian Barwick at [email protected]last_img read more

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ND student government offers opportunities for first years

first_imgO’SNAP, a late-night ride home. It’s On Us, a national campaign against sexual assault. Comedy on the Quad, the beginning-of-the-year big-name stand-up show. An annual report on a student issue to the Board of Trustees. Notre Dame’s student government is responsible for many of the initiatives, events and even policies on campus – it aims to be, said student body vice president Rebecca Blais, “a direct line of communication between students and the administration.” Blais said she hopes freshmen will be involved in student government, whether by participating in its initiatives or joining the administration. She said she and student body president Corey Robinson will visit sessions of the Moreau First Year Experience and encourage freshmen to visit the student government office. “It’s a totally free-flowing environment, full of ideas,” she said. “It’s an awesome way for students to get involved.” As president and vice president, Robinson and Blais oversee the executive cabinet, a series of topic-based departments which, along with the hall-elected Student Senate, work on specific issues and projects by topic and make reports, resolutions and recommendations to the University administration. One of those departments, the First Undergraduate Experience in Leadership (FUEL) is geared directly to freshmen, allowing them to help with or develop student government projects. Dan Hopkinson, who was a member of FUEL as a freshman and now serves as the department co-director, said FUEL is a “stepping stone” for students who want to be involved in policymaking at Notre Dame.  FUEL members each join an executive department — for example, Academic Affairs or Gender Issues — and work on projects with that department, in addition to developing their own, Hopkinson said. Hopkinson said he and co-FUEL director Nabila Mourad hope to involve freshmen more in student government’s decision-making, as well as connect them to volunteer opportunities, host a retreat and set up a networking fair with other student government members.“We’re really hoping to give people hands-on experience in being a part of a project in student government, to implement their requests and meet with administrators and get people to see what student government can do, so they’re more inclined to be a part of it,” Hopkinson saidThe point, he said, is to give first years an “in” in student government — nearly half of last year’s FUEL members continued with student government in some way. “It’s a way for a dedicated and motivated student to get their foot in the door in student government and learn about it, and then hopefully move up in student government in whatever way that may be, whether Senate, Executive Cabinet or SUB,” Hopkinson said. SUB — Student Union Board — is a programming arm of student government, along with Class Councils. SUB is responsible for many campus events, including Comedy on the Quad; Acousticafe, a weekly student concert; and AnTostal, a week of festivities before spring finals. SUB executive director Louis Bertolotti said students often get involved in the organization as freshmen, joining various planning committees, but they did not have space of their own. FY SUB, a new program geared specifically towards freshmen, will introduce first-years to each other and bring in students to speak about SUB’s departments and leadership, junior Madi Purrenhage said, who is running the program. “It’s to introduce them to SUB, to prepare them to enter whatever club they want to go into, give them real skills they can use and let them have fun and know that SUB is like a family and they can find their place in there,” Purrenhage said. Other than FUEL and SUB, student government is expansive. The class council of the class of 2020 will elect members from their residence halls this fall to plan events and programs for their year, while the upperclassmen classes elect an executive board for their class, who then select their own councils. The Judicial Council oversees student government elections and ethics and recruits from all classes. Residence hall councils often invite freshmen to meetings, and other councils and boards manage clubs and finances. Bertolotti, who has been involved since his own freshman year, said student government offers opportunities to make change for students with a variety of interests. “The big thing I can say is that as a first year, you’re a small fish in a big pond,” he said. “It’s hard sometimes to believe you can make a difference, but you can, and it’s through student government.” Tags: Freshman Orientation 2016last_img read more

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Panel discusses post-graduate service opportunities

first_imgOn Monday evening, a panel featuring former and current members of AmeriCorps, Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE), Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC), JVC Northwest and the Peace Corps was held in the Student Center at Saint Mary’s to discuss pursuing service as an option after graduation. The panel, titled “Discerning Your Future: Is Post-graduate Service Right For You?” was co-sponsored by Office for Civil and Social Engagement and the College Career Crossings office. The panelists discussed discernment and their own personal journeys deciding if doing service and volunteer work was the path for them.“I vividly remember my discernment process and how incredibly overwhelmed and nervous I was,” Anna Herrmann, a recruiter with JVC, said. “Something that was helpful to me in my discernment process was to learn to start from a space of positivity, a space of gratitude and being able to decide what was best for me, to have options. To understand what a privilege it was to want to do something that not everyone really has the ability to do.”JVC is a post-grad service program that has placements around the country and world. The program currently runs in 37 cities and six countries. Herrmann said her discernment process led her to the JVC because it answered her questions about her place in the world and how best to serve people. “How could I best serve the world, knowing what I know about myself?” Hermann said. “Knowing that I want to be in a space of community, knowing I’m at my best when I’m serving communities, so I wanted a program that emphasized that. Knowing that I wanted to continue to grow in my faith outside of the university setting, which had really helped me to foster that. Knowing that I really wanted to work with diverse populations but I didn’t have the experience yet to say that was something I wanted to do. I wanted an experience to help me grow personally and professionally.”For Itzxul Moreno, associate program director for ACE Teaching Fellows and a 2017 Saint Mary’s alumna, discernment really boiled down to where her “greatest joy and [her] greatest hunger met.”“When I was an upperclassman at Saint Mary’s, I started thinking about, what is discernment for me, and where would I like to go from here,” Moreno said. “When it came time to look inward for what it was that I wanted and what I wanted to do, I knew it had to be something around helping others and being in fellowship with others.”Chris Suriano, recruitment coordinator for JVC Northwest, said his path to service was discovered on an “alternative spring break trip” his senior year of college that opened his eyes to volunteer work. Regarding discernment, Suriano said to “take your time, do your research, really, really think about what’s important to you, what you want to learn and where you want to make it because the opportunities are available to you.”Andrea Tiller, a recruiter for the Peace Corps, a federal independent agency that work in sustainable development projects in 61 countries worldwide, said her own personal discernment came a little bit later than most Peace Corps volunteers.Tiller worked in law enforcement in Michigan for 20 years before she had a “call in her heart to serve.”“I think an important thing to ask yourself and when you’re talking to your folks, is thinking about why life is more than just a job, right?” Tiller said. “The call in my heart was about 10 years in the making, so I was feeding that, kind of scratching that itch, going to different countries, staying for a couple weeks, helping out, living with a family, learning the language, doing cultural exchange. Then come back to my office, and it just wasn’t enough. For 10 years I’d been doing this, putting a band-aid on, when I knew what I really wanted to do. Which was go somewhere for a substantial amount of time, not just a hot-minute study abroad. I wanted to build relationships that were deeper.”After hearing stories of people answering the call to serve after college, students attending the panel then began to share their own personal discernment.“I’m a Spanish and secondary education major,” said senior Lupe Garcilazo when discussing her motivation to pursue service. ”I want to teach but I kind of want to get a little bit more experience, like in another country, or with people that speak other languages or have other cultures different from mine.”Junior Mary Blake said she is also discerning a post-graduate service experience.“I’ve always enjoyed helping people, and spending my time in a meaningful way,” junior Mary Blake said. “And people say if you’re not quite ready to jump into an office, or a career, this is a great way to spend some time in between.”Tags: ACE, Alliance for Catholic Education, Career Crossings Office, Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Office for Civic and Social Engagement, Peace Corps, Post-graduate servicelast_img read more

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Vermont gets $18 million to help establish Affordable Insurance Exchanges

first_imgStates across the country have more flexibility and resources to implement the Affordable Care Act, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced today. Vermont today joins 12 other states receiving grants to help establish Affordable Insurance Exchanges ‘ one-stop marketplaces where consumers can choose a private health insurance plan that fits their health needs and have the same kinds of insurance choices as members of Congress.  Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin said in a statement: ‘This was great news from Washington because the $18 million federal grant will enable us to create an easy-to-use web-based system to help people find health care benefits, plan for affordable benefit packages for Vermonters, and more. This grant will move us further along the path toward a single-payer health care system in Vermont that controls skyrocketing costs threatening Vermont families and businesses.’ The Vermont Health Benefit Exchange will vastly simplify health insurance purchasing and enrollment in Vermont’s public health care programs for many Vermonters, beginning in 2014. The federal Exchange Implementation Grant funds received today will assist Vermont to build state-of-the-art information technology system for the Exchange. The state will be able to use the same system for running the single-payer plan, Green Mountain Care. For example, the Exchange funds will build an interactive website to allow Vermonters to compare insurance plans on an apples to apples basis, similar to the way travel sites can be used to find the right time and date to take a plane trip. Today’s awards bring to 29 the number of states that are making significant progress in creating Affordable Insurance Exchanges.  These Exchanges were created by the Affordable Care Act and are designed to take the guesswork and confusion out of buying health insurance. Nearly $220 million in Exchange grants was awarded to States today. The Vermont Agency of Human Services will receive more than $18 million in funding to further its planning, development, and design of the Vermont Health Benefits Exchange. The State will work with consumers and other stakeholder groups to continue health insurance market reforms, and development of new information technology systems. The funds will also fund a number of staff positions. Vermont intends to continue moving forward in the design of an Exchange that will coordinate  with other government health care programs in the State, and a platform for the evolution of the single-payer health care system envisioned in Vermont statute. HHS also released several Frequently Asked Questions providing answers to key questions States need to know as they work to set up these new marketplaces. Critical among these is that States that run Exchanges have more options than originally proposed when it comes to determining eligibility for tax credits and Medicaid.  And States have until June 2012 to apply for ‘Level One’ Exchange grants. ‘We are committed to giving States the flexibility to implement the Affordable Care Act in the way that works for them,’ Secretary Sebelius said. ‘And Exchanges will give consumers more choices and make it easy to compare and shop for insurance plans.’ In the new Exchanges, insurers will provide new information such as an easy-to-understand summary of benefits and costs to consumers. The level of detail will sharpen competition between carriers which will drive costs down. HHS is also releasing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) in anticipation of State legislative sessions beginning in January. Answers will help advance State policy development for Exchanges.  For example, they clarify that Exchange grants can be used to build a State Exchange that is operational after 2014; that State-based Exchanges will not be charged for accessing Federal data needed to run Exchanges in 2014; and that State insurance rules and operations will continue even if the Federal government is facilitating an Exchange in the State.   HHS will also allow greater flexibility in eligibility determinations, allowing, for example, a State-based Exchange to permit the Federal government to determine eligibility for premium tax credits.  Of the 13 States awarded grants today, 12 are receiving Level One grants, which provide one year of funding to States that have already made progress using their Exchange planning grant.  The 13th State, Rhode Island, is receiving the first Level Two grant, which provides multi-year funding to States further along in the planning process. Forty-nine States and the District of Columbia have already received planning grants, and 45 States have consulted with consumer advocates and insurance companies.  Thirteen States have passed legislation to create an Exchange.  States have many opportunities to apply for funding. To accommodate State legislative sessions and to give States more time to apply, HHS also announced a six month extension for Level One establishment grant applications. Applications now will be accepted until June 29, 2012 (the original deadline was December 30, 2011). For more information on the State receiving grants, visit http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/2011/05/exchanges05232011a.html(link is external) For FAQs, visit: http://cciio.cms.gov/(link is external) For more information on Affordable Insurance Exchanges, visit http://www.HealthCare.gov/law/features/choices/exchanges/index.html(link is external).last_img read more

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Trail Mix | October 2017

first_img Northern Lights This Pale Fire 3:10 Workin On My Protest Song Bob Bradshaw 3:53 Granny Smith Lost Bayou Ramblers 2:45 4:27 2:37 Make it Me Max Gomez 3:40 4:09 3:59 3:34 Falling Out Of Love Lydia Loveless Sundress The Alternate Routes Denver Girls Gill Landry 3:40 6:23 1972 Christian Lopez It Makes No Difference (The Band) Misner And Smith April and May Chris Barron Embed Gasoline King Cardinal 3:28 This Old Main Drag Is About To Drag Me Down Ryan Koenig 2:16 The folks doing right by country music today do so by tuning in to the echoes of yesteryear.Vintage country sounds have made a comeback in recent years, and Whitney Rose, an Austin, Texas based songstress, is a leading female voice in the movement. Her brand new record, Rule 62, drops this week, and it resonates with old country twang. Rose is dusty dance hall two steppin’ instead of modern country bling and glitz, and her songs fall easy on the ears. Get your Texas boogie on with “Can’t Stop Shakin’” on this month’s mix.Christian Lopez is another artist doing country right these days. Blessed with a crooner’s voice and devilish good looks, Lopez writes songs that hearken back to younger years spent listening to the likes of Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, and Waylon Jennings.  Lopez found inspiration in his International Harvester Scout in the song “1972,” from the brand new record Red Arrow, which we feature this month.From time to time, an artist pops back on to the radar after a long time away and the thought arises that, yeah, I used to dig what this guy does. Such was this case recently with Chris Barron, former front man of 90s pop hit makers The Spin Doctors. Barron returns with a solo record this month, Angels and One Armed Jugglers, and the mix is excited to feature the tune “April & May” this month.This month’s mix also features the return of some spectacular songwriters, including Gill Landry, Lydia Loveless, and J.D. McPherson, as well as a new track from long time favorites Turnpike Troubadours. Trail Mix is always happy to welcome back old friends.Brand new tracks from Ranky Tanky, Max Gomez, Silver Torches, Ragged Union, Lost Bayou Ramblers, Swimming Bell, The Alternate Routes, Bob Bradshaw, Ryan Koenig, Monocle Band, Misner & Smith, and This Pale Fire await your perusal.And please tune in to the Trail Mix blog this month. Chats with Billy Strings, Flat Duo Jets, and King Cardinal are all on tap.Download and stream this month’s mix. Take it on your next outdoor adventure. Tell a friend or a stranger, and then get out there and grab some records or concert tickets. Give back to these outstanding musicians who give freely to us. 3:53 4:24 Copy and paste this code to your site to embed. Let It Be A Dream Silver Torches 4:09 Lora Lee The Monocle Band Leaving Louisville Ragged Union 1:32 3:32 Turmoil & Tinfoil Billy Strings The Housefire Turnpike Troubadours LUCKY PENNY JD McPherson Ranky Tanky Ranky Tanky Audio PlayerLost Bayou RamblersGranny SmithUse Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.00:000:00 / 4:24 3:55 Pink Gardenia Flat Duo Jets Can’t Stop Shakin’ Whitney Rose 3:07 Ealing Common Swimming Bell 4:21 6:13 last_img read more

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The definition of differentiation: Doing something your competition will not copy

first_imgCredit union marketers are notorious for R & D (rip off and duplicate) as evidenced by the proliferation of “shiny happy people’ on their websites and me too products and pricing. Most credit unions will say their differentiation is their service, which, if you think about it – cannot be if everyone else is saying the same thing. Very seldom these days does a credit union brand stand out. Great brand names have been dropped for synthesized non-words that mean nothing. For the most part, we’ve become pretty generic. But today I read an article that made my heart sing. The article is titled “O Bee Credit Union’s pub-themed branches might just be a sneaky genius.” I knew about O Bee Credit Union from having lived in the Pacific NW most of my life. I even had the pleasure of speaking at an All Staff Day several years ago. So I know they have a fun spirit and respect and honor their past. And their past is beer.The Olympia Brewing Company was founded 122 years ago in Tumwater, Washington. Through a series of consolidations, it was acquired by Pabst Brewing Company and the Tumwater brewery was closed in 2003. Most credit unions would merge, change their name, run from their heritage in an effort to tell the world that now “Anyone in Washington can join.” O Bee changed their charter so that anyone in the state could join, but they did not change who they are, and where they came from. Instead, they cranked it up. In 1955, Ted McGill, a worker in Bottle House “A” heard about credit unions and thought it was a good idea so he persuaded his co-workers to form The Olympia Brewing Company Employees and Family Credit Union. Ted was afraid he would have to write out that long name so he called it O Bee. In the early years, Ted WAS the credit union. He would walk around the brewery and accept deposits and put them in his shirt pocket. When he got home and his wife Vi would sit at the kitchen table and post the books and make the deposits. Their modest dining room served as the first branch of O Bee until 20 years later when they opened their first physical branch. So back to the article I read, O Bee credit union opened a new branch that is basically a museum to their founders. The branch features local brewery beer taps and brass railings along the teller counter and windows. Wooden hop barrels, brick walls, hand-painted murals and historical images of a brewery, along with a chalkboard menu with “specials,” are design elements to give the feel of a tasting room.This is part of a growing trend in banking to try and make branches look like something other than branches. Branches are being tricked up with living room furniture, fireplaces, coffee stations……but in the spirit of R & D soon that will be the norm and everyone continues to be the same. Not O Bee Credit Union. Only they can claim their history and they are smart to use this as a differentiator. No one will copy it! Too many times I will go to a credit union website and not even see a tab for the history. And even more often I’ll see an “About US” tab only to read the boring “We are a not-for-profit financial institution serving people who live, work or worship in blah blah blah…..who cares? It’s so important that we do not forget our history and tell the story and honor those hard working individuals that made the credit union possible. Today many credit unions “stories” talk about historical growth, a number of branches, added products and services. That’s not a story, that’s a financial statement. O Bee Credit Union made a big statement, that the work that Ted did still matters and Tumwater Washington would not be what it is today without the brewery. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Denise Wymore Denise started her credit union career over 30 years ago as a Teller for Pacific NW Federal Credit Union in Portland, Oregon. She moved up and around the org. chart … Web: www.nacuso.org Detailslast_img read more

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Blizzard Watch Issued for Long Island, Foot of Snow Possible

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Island will be under a blizzard watch starting Saturday morning as the first major winter storm of the season barrels toward the region.The National Weather Service’s advisory warns that the impending Nor’easter could dump up to a foot of snow on the Island. Strong winds and the heavy snow are expected to limit visibility to ¼ mile or less. The blizzard watch will be in effect until Sunday afternoon.“Extremely dangerous travel due to heavy snowfall and strong winds with whiteout conditions likely,” the weather service said in a statement. “Secondary and tertiary roads may become impassable. Strong winds may down power lines and tree limbs.”A blizzard watch means there is a potential for falling and/or blowing snow with strong winds and extremely poor visibility, making travel dangerous, the agency explained.Forecasters are expecting 35 mph winds and 50 mph gusts Saturday. The current forecast has snow arriving Saturday afternoon, followed by periods of rain, snow and sleet. The snow could be heavy at times, forecasters said.Up to a foot of snow is possible across Long Island over the weekend. (Photo credit: Accuweather)Dubbed “Jonas” by The Weather Channel, the powerful storm could impact up to 15 states with blizzard conditions as south as Washington D.C. and Maryland.Officials on Long Island are warning residents to use caution while traveling.“The message from the Suffolk County Police Department today is please be careful with the storm coming this weekend…Be prepared,” Deputy Commissioner Tim Sini told reporters during a press conference Wednesday.The department already has equipment and people in place throughout the county to ensure road safety, Sini said.“If you can stay off the roads, stay off it,” he said. “And if you have to travel, please use caution. Speed is your enemy.”At a press conference Thursday morning, Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano echoed Sini’s warnings, urging residents to stay off the roads if travel isn’t necessary. The county has more than 200 employees at the ready and more than 28,000 tons of salt available to treat roadways, Mangano noted.Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state is preparing to allocate resources to localities caught in the storm’s path.“This storm could have a significant impact in communities throughout the downstate area–so I am directing all relevant state agencies to be on alert and ready to respond as the weather develops,” Cuomo said in a statement. “We will be closely monitoring storm conditions throughout the weekend, and deploying resources and equipment as necessary.”PSEG Long Island is conducting logistics and system checks ahead of the Nor’easter to “ensure the availability of critical materials, fuel and other supplies.”“While snow and wind normally don’t pose a serious problem to the electric system, icing on lines and trees can increase the possibility of downed wires and power outages,” PSEG LI’s John O’Connell said in a statement.Forecasters expect highs of 32 and 36 degrees Saturday and Sunday, respectively.Friday is expected to be dry and chilly. The forecast calls for a high of 22 with wind chill values as low as 15.last_img read more

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