Funerals held as 157 victims of the genocide in Rwanda…

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] The recently discovered bodies of 157 victims of the Rwandan Genocide have been laid to rest in a former Anglican Church, alongside the bodies of 36,700 victims already buried there. On April 15, 1994, more than 25,000 people seeking refuge and sanctuary at the Ruhanga Episcopal Anglican Church were slaughtered. The church is now a memorial for the victims. The scenes at Ruhanga were repeated at other churches across Rwanda. While several of them have been turned into memorials, Ruhanga is the only Anglican church that has become a memorial site.Read the entire article here. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Posted Apr 18, 2018 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Africa, Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Funerals held as 157 victims of the genocide in Rwanda buried in Ruhanga memorial Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

Read More →

4 funding opportunities: for housing, road safety, youth bereavement, & cash access projects

first_imgCAF Venturesome launches housing fund for community groupsCAF Venturesome is launching a housing fund that aims to empower community groups to plan and build a thousand affordable homes in local communities across the country.Since 2008, CAF Venturesome, the social investment arm of the Charities Aid Foundation, has provided more than £5m in social investment to build 190 affordable new homes, with 470 in the pipeline through their Community Land Trust Funds. Its new CLF Fund plans to support up to 1,000 more.CAF Venturesome’s Holly Piper said:“We launched this new fund in response to the increasing demand from community groups to deliver affordable housing. People want to live in a community where they have easy access to family support, good employment opportunities and where house prices are affordable for locals. Too often, that’s not the case.” Advertisement Community Access to Cash Pilots initiative launchesCommunities across the UK are encouraged to apply to participate in the new Community Access to Cash Pilots, launched to help test solutions to local access to cash needs, with the goal of developing scalable solutions that can inform national policy.The independent scheme launched this month to help communities retain free access to cash as the UK shifts to an increasingly cashless society, and is chaired by Natalie Ceeney CBE, author of the 2019 Access to Cash Review.The Review found that 17% of the UK population rely on cash, with vulnerable communities, including the poor and those in rural areas, at particular risk from reduced access.Ceeney is asking for communities to volunteer to take part in the Community Access to Cash Pilots. Successful applicants will work alongside the payments and customer experts to develop solutions that will help them to adapt to the changing payments landscape.Solutions will be developed by and with local communities, to meet local needs. The aim is to create new approaches to current challenges, which include helping local shops to give cashback, supporting groups to become more comfortable making digital payments or developing solutions to help small businesses continue to bank cash.To join the pilot, communities must complete an application form and submit it by midnight on Friday 1 May 2020. The scheme will then work with the pilot communities over the course of 2020, first to understand local needs and develop possible solutions, and then to implement agreed solutions. While this is an independent initiative, funding will come from the banking and finance industry with the Board deciding which communities to support, and how funding is allocated. Tagged with: Funding Funding available for road safety projectsThe Road Safety Trust has launched its 2020 Grants Programme, and is inviting public and private organisations, charities and other not for profits to apply.The Road Safety Trust funds research and practical interventions committed to reducing the number of people killed or injured on UK roads. Since it was established in 2014, the Trust has awarded grants worth £2.7m to 35 different projects.  Grants are available for up to two or three years depending on the programme, and can range from £10,000 up to £200,000.Sally Lines, Chief Executive of Road Safety Trust said:“Developing and emerging technologies have a huge impact on the way that we live.  We want to use the 2020 grant scheme to really explore and benefit from the use of technology to improve road safety and in turn help us work towards our vision of zero deaths and serious injuries on UK roads.“We would like to see a focus on the innovation that is happening throughout the UK and help fund in-vehicle, infrastructure or new technological applications or tools. We want to see funding applications that address a specific road safety problem and explain why it has been identified.”The Major Grants Programme will be open for applications until 14 May. More information and applications are via the website.  381 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 Melanie May | 21 February 2020 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 4 funding opportunities: for housing, road safety, youth bereavement, & cash access projects Here are four funding opportunities, covering the launch of a housing fund from CAF Venturesome, money for road safety projects from the Road Safety Trust, the launch of the Community Access to Cash Pilots, and funding for youth bereavement projects from Co-op Funeralcare and Co-op Foundation. Funding launched to help young people going through bereavementCo-op Foundation has partnered with Co-op Funeralcare to deliver £50,000 of funding for youth bereavement projects.Organisations across the UK can now apply for grants of up to £10,000 for projects that help young people support each other during bereavement.Grants are available through the Co-op Foundation’s #iwill Fund. The Foundation expects to make about five grants in total and organisations have until 12pm (noon) on Friday 3 April to apply at http://bit.ly/iwill-bereavement.Successful applicants should use funding for social action projects that equip young people with the skills they need to provide peer support. Grants could also help young people to use their experiences as a way to speak up and recommend how local services can help other bereaved young people.Co-op Funeralcare’s involvement is in direct response to findings from its ‘biggest ever survey’, which surveyed over 30,000 people to understand the nation’s experiences and attitudes towards death, dying and bereavement.It found that 16 to 29-year-olds are the age group most likely to bottle up grief, with just under a quarter (24%) saying they ‘kept it to themselves’ when suffering a bereavement. Young people were also most likely to be left out of social arrangements because of bereavement.The Co-op Foundation’s #iwill Fund supports the aims of the #iwill campaign that wants to make social action a part of life for as many 10 to 20-year-olds as possible.  380 total views,  2 views today According to CAF Venturesome, research data collected by Homes England shows that more than 16,000 community-led homes are currently in the pipeline with the 2019 Helping Communities Build report identifying one barrier holding back further investment as lack of access to early stage finance for community groups.The CLH Fund is open for applications for loans, standby facilities and grants (in England only) at every stage of the project. Power to Change, the charitable trust which supports community businesses, has contributed £500,000 to offer cash grants as part of the project.Supporters of the fund include the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, Power to Change, the Tudor Trust, Nationwide Foundation, CAF and several individual philanthropists. About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Read More →

90 years after death, Lenin’s contributions appreciated

first_imgV.I. LeninLenin is the recognized leader of the political party that directed the working-class’s seizure of state power in Russia in the fall of 1917. For the first time in history, a subject class was placed at the head of society.Lenin had built the Bolshevik Party, later the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, and he was the architect setting up the framework of the new multinational state of many peoples, stretching from Eastern Europe to Siberia, from the Arctic Sea to Central Asia.Lenin, whose real name was Vladimir Ilich Ulyanov, died from a stroke at the age of 53 on Jan. 21, 1924 — 90 years ago. We know that no revolution can be the work of a single individual. Tens of millions of human beings whose life conditions drive them to understand the need to struggle and sacrifice need to participate and cooperate to bring such a revolution about. More than any other single individual, however, Lenin was responsible for the workers’ victory in Russia.This revolution and the Soviet state aided, inspired and supported the uprisings that liberated many of the oppressed countries from imperialism and workers from exploitation during the 20th century. The USSR, a product of the 1917 revolution, was the greatest nightmare for the imperialist ruling class. For that reason, the bankers, billionaires and their paid propagandists made the Soviet Union a pariah state and hated Lenin more than any other single individual in history. To this day, he remains the number one historical enemy of the rich.At the same time, Lenin remains a beacon for those who want to struggle.  This is especially true for revolutionaries living in the industrialized and urbanized countries that are part of the imperialist world and where the masses most often live in cities. They want to construct a framework to facilitate a revolution that overthrows capitalism and starts to build a new world where exploitation and inequality are eliminated.Lenin’s contributions to revolutionary history are rich. Others will undoubtedly make their own additions to the four lessons listed here, which remain essential to carrying out class struggle in the 21st century:Lenin’s analysis of world imperialism, written during World War I, underlined the inevitability of the drive toward war and conquest growing out of the capitalist system when it had become a worldwide phenomenon.Lenin’s analysis of the “national question” and how communists should relate to the struggle of peoples and nations for self-determination, including independence, united the communists and the movements for liberation throughout the colonial world.Lenin’s approach to organizing a working-class party. He outlined this in his 1901 pamphlet, “What Is to Be Done,” and carried it out through the 1917 revolution and beyond. Lenin’s work was specific to the reality of Czarist Russia of that period, but the principles he laid out for creating a party that is an instrument of effective working-class struggle have remained intact since.Lenin extended Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’ analysis of the capitalist state in his work, “State and Revolution,” which he wrote in August and September of 1917 while forced into hiding. The imperialist states have grown even more weaponized and bureaucratic since that day, as have the capitalist states in Asia, Africa and Latin America. This pamphlet has the happiest of endings, as Lenin noted in explaining why he had to stop writing: “It is more pleasant and useful to go through the ‘experience of the revolution’ than to write about it.”He not only experienced that revolution but led it. It was the major factor in the history of the 20th century until it was reversed in 1989-1991.To open the study of Lenin in this 90th year after his death, we’d like to call attention to an article written by late-Workers World Party founder Sam Marcy in 1992, which is available online at tinyurl.com/jw8mm6v. This work, written after the disappearance of the Soviet Union, analyzes the enormous problems that the Bolsheviks faced in the period just after the 1917 Revolution. It is a good way to begin to appreciate the contributions of Lenin.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Read More →

Armed forces briefly silence broadcast media after chief of staff and president murdered

first_imgNews Reporters Without Borders is relieved to learn that Guinea-Bissau’s broadcast media were allowed to resume operating shortly after midday today after being ordered off the air last night following the murder of the armed forces chief of staff, which was followed in turn early today by the murder of President Joao Bernardo “Nino” Vieira.“Amid the current instability, we urge all of Guinea-Bissau’s actors, especially the armed forces, to respect press freedom,” Reporters Without Borders said. “More than ever, the circumstances require that journalists be protected and that their ability to work freely be guaranteed.”At around 9 p.m. yesterday, about an hour after the bomb attack at the headquarters of the armed forces that killed the chief of staff, Gen. Tagmé Na Waié, the army ordered the capital’s privately-owned radio stations and the national television station to stop broadcasting for “security reasons.” This morning, the local radio and TV stations broadcast only music, while the international media broadcasts continued to be received. The resumption of normal broadcasting took place at about 1 p.m. today.In reprisal for yesterday evening’s attack on the armed forces headquarters, soldiers loyal to the slain chief of staff went to President Vieira’s private home in the early hours of this morning and killed him as he was trying to flee.In a November 2007 report entitled “Cocaine and coups haunt gagged nation” about the precarious situation of Guinea-Bissau’s journalists, Reporters Without Borders asked the armed forces to follow the law in the event of any conflict with the media and to publicly recognise the importance of a vigorous, free and well-informed press for the success of the country’s reconstruction. The military authorities never acted on this request. Guinean journalist finally freed after being held for nearly three months April 15, 2021 Find out more Guinean journalist’s continuing detention is “incomprehensible,” RSF says to go further News Help by sharing this information GuineaAfrica Follow the news on Guinea Newscenter_img RSF_en April 9, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Guinea : RSF and AIPS call for release of two imprisoned journalists News March 2, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Armed forces briefly silence broadcast media after chief of staff and president murdered GuineaAfrica May 19, 2021 Find out more Organisation last_img read more

Read More →

Four journalists released

first_imgNews Under Chinese pressure, Nepal sanctions three journalists over Dalai Lama story Three journalists, including the Secretary General of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, Bishnu Nisthuri were among eight people released on 25 February. He had spent 21 days in prison. Security forces meanwhile detained for a week the editor of a weekly newspaper in the east of the country. Organisation News February 25, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Four journalists released Follow the news on Nepal RSF_en News Help by sharing this information NepalAsia – Pacific May 29, 2019 Find out more June 8, 2020 Find out more Nepalese journalists threatened, attacked and censored over Covid-19 coverage NepalAsia – Pacific The army on 1st March released Dipin Rai, editor of the weekly Mukti Aawaj published in Jhapa, western Nepal. He said he had been released unconditionally but refused to give any information about his questioning by the security forces.——————————————————————–Three journalists released, another one arrestedReporters Without Borders repeated an appeal for the release of the nine journalists still imprisoned in Nepal after three journalists were released on 25 FebruaryThe authorities freed Bishnu Nishthuri, Secretary General of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, after 21 days imprisonment; Khem Bhandari, editor of the daily Abhiyan, and Sujeeb Bajracharya, editor of the daily City Times. Seven public figures, including a former minister and an ex-ambassador, were released on the order of Baman Prasad Neupane, head of the Kathmandu district administrative office.Khem Bhandari, detained since 16 February, was sentenced by the authorities in Kanchanpur district in the east of the country, to pay a fine of 5,000 rupees (50 euros) for infringing the press law.The previous day, Dipin Rai, editor of the regional weekly Mukti Aawaj and local official for the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, was arrested at his home by security forces in Jhapa, east of the country. All publications in the Jhapa district were closed on 1 February but Dipin Rai had republished his weekly on 22 February. The journalist has been held since 23 February at the barracks of the Chaar Aali battalion in Jhapa.________________________________________________________________________________22.02.2005Eleven journalists imprisonedReporters Without Borders has renewed an appeal for the release of 11 journalists currently being held in prisons in Nepal.Six of those being held were among at least 16 journalists security forces picked up after King Gyanendra seized power on 1 February and declared a state of emergency.Nepal was already holding five journalists before the royal coup, making it, after China, Cuba and Eritrea, the world’s fourth largest prison for journalists.”Until they are released we will continue to urge the international community, particularly the European Union, to apply political and economic sanctions against Nepal”, the worldwide press freedom organisation said. It was particularly regrettable that Nepal was using exceptional and anti-terror laws to detain the journalists, it added.The six journalists still being held after their arrest on the orders of the palace are:Bishnu Nisthuri, Secretary General of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, arrested on 4 February.Naryan Adhikari, RSS and Kalifa FM, arrested 13 February.Basanta Parajuli, Gorkhapatra and Synergy FM, arrested 13 February.D. R. Panta, Kantipur, arrested 15 February.Sujeeb Bajracharya, City Times, arrested 16 February.Khem Bhandari, Abhiyan, arrested 16 February.The security forces have used exceptional laws to keep the journalists in prison. Narayan Adhikari and Basanta Parajuli, arrested in Chitawan district, were placed in custody for 90 days under the state of emergency. Police who arrested them said it was for criticising the king’s orders. Their families can visit them daily for 10 minutes. In the far west of the country, Bhandari, editor of the local daily Abhiyan, was detained for covering a local opposition demonstration. Police had previously arrested him at the beginning of February. Nepal: RSF’s recommendations to amend controversial Media Council Bill to go further Receive email alerts News May 17, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

Read More →

Caltech Professor Discovers “Failed Stars” Host Powerful Auroral Displays

first_img Community News Artist’s impression of an auroral display on a brown dwarf. Credit: Chuck Carter and Gregg Hallinan/CaltechBrown dwarfs are relatively cool, dim objects that are difficult to detect and hard to classify. They are too massive to be planets, yet possess some planetlike characteristics; they are too small to sustain hydrogen fusion reactions at their cores, a defining characteristic of stars, yet they have starlike attributes.By observing a brown dwarf 20 light-years away using both radio and optical telescopes, a team led by Gregg Hallinan, assistant professor of astronomy at Caltech, has found another feature that makes these so-called failed stars more like supersized planets—they host powerful auroras near their magnetic poles.The findings appear in the July 30 issue of the journal Nature.“We’re finding that brown dwarfs are not like small stars in terms of their magnetic activity; they’re like giant planets with hugely powerful auroras,” says Hallinan. “If you were able to stand on the surface of the brown dwarf we observed—something you could never do because of its extremely hot temperatures and crushing surface gravity—you would sometimes be treated to a fantastic light show courtesy of auroras hundreds of thousands of times more powerful than any detected in our solar system.”In the early 2000s, astronomers began finding that brown dwarfs emit radio waves. At first, everyone assumed that the brown dwarfs were creating the radio waves in basically the same way that stars do—through the action of an extremely hot atmosphere, or corona, heated by magnetic activity near the object’s surface. But brown dwarfs do not generate large flares and charged-particle emissions in the way that our sun and other stars do, so the radio emissions were surprising.While in graduate school, in 2006, Hallinan discovered that brown dwarfs can actually pulse at radio frequencies. “We see a similar pulsing phenomenon from planets in our solar system,” says Hallinan, “and that radio emission is actually due to auroras.” Since then he has wondered if the radio emissions seen on brown dwarfs might be caused by auroras.Auroral displays result when charged particles, carried by the stellar wind for example, manage to enter a planet’s magnetosphere, the region where such charged particles are influenced by the planet’s magnetic field. Once within the magnetosphere, those particles get accelerated along the planet’s magnetic field lines to the planet’s poles, where they collide with gas atoms in the atmosphere and produce the bright emissions associated with auroras.Following his hunch, Hallinan and his colleagues conducted an extensive observation campaign of a brown dwarf called LSRJ 1835+3259, using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory’s Very Large Array (VLA), the most powerful radio telescope in the world, as well as optical instruments that included Palomar’s Hale Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory’s telescopes.Using the VLA they detected a bright pulse of radio waves that appeared as the brown dwarf rotated around. The object rotates every 2.84 hours, so the researchers were able to watch nearly three full rotations over the course of a single night.Next, the astronomers used the Hale Telescope to observe that the brown dwarf varied optically on the same period as the radio pulses. Focusing on one of the spectral lines associated with excited hydrogen—the h-alpha emission line—they found that the object’s brightness varied periodically.Finally, Hallinan and his colleagues used the Keck telescopes to measure precisely the brightness of the brown dwarf over time—no simple feat given that these objects are many thousands of times fainter than our own sun. Hallinan and his team were able to establish that this hydrogen emission is a signature of auroras near the surface of the brown dwarf.“As the electrons spiral down toward the atmosphere, they produce radio emissions, and then when they hit the atmosphere, they excite hydrogen in a process that occurs at Earth and other planets, albeit tens of thousands of times more intense,” explains Hallinan. “We now know that this kind of auroral behavior is extending all the way from planets up to brown dwarfs.”In the case of brown dwarfs, charged particles cannot be driven into their magnetosphere by a stellar wind, as there is no stellar wind to do so. Hallinan says that some other source, such as an orbiting planet moving through the brown dwarf’s magnetosphere, may be generating a current and producing the auroras. “But until we map the aurora accurately, we won’t be able to say where it’s coming from,” he says.He notes that brown dwarfs offer a convenient stepping stone to studying exoplanets, planets orbiting stars other than our own sun. “For the coolest brown dwarfs we’ve discovered, their atmosphere is pretty similar to what we would expect for many exoplanets, and you can actually look at a brown dwarf and study its atmosphere without having a star nearby that’s a factor of a million times brighter obscuring your observations,” says Hallinan.Just as he has used measurements of radio waves to determine the strength of magnetic fields around brown dwarfs, he hopes to use the low-frequency radio observations of the newly built Owens Valley Long Wavelength Array to measure the magnetic fields of exoplanets. “That could be particularly interesting because whether or not a planet has a magnetic field may be an important factor in habitability,” he says. “I’m trying to build a picture of magnetic field strength and topology and the role that magnetic fields play as we go from stars to brown dwarfs and eventually right down into the planetary regime.”The work, “Magnetospherically driven optical and radio aurorae at the end of the main sequence,” was supported by funding from the National Science Foundation. Additional authors on the paper include Caltech senior postdoctoral scholar Stephen Bourke, Caltech graduate students Sebastian Pineda and Melodie Kao, Leon Harding of JPL, Stuart Littlefair of the University of Sheffield, Garret Cotter of the University of Oxford, Ray Butler of National University of Ireland, Galway, Aaron Golden of Yeshiva University, Gibor Basri of UC Berkeley, Gerry Doyle of Armagh Observatory, Svetlana Berdyugina of the Kiepenheuer Institute for Solar Physics, Alexey Kuznetsov of the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics in Irkutsk, Russia, Michael Rupen of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, and Antoaneta Antonova of Sofia University. 10 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy More Cool Stuff Business News Make a comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website center_img Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. center column 4 Caltech Professor Discovers “Failed Stars” Host Powerful Auroral Displays Caltech astronomers say brown dwarfs behave more like planets than stars By KIMM FESENMAIER Published on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 | 11:47 am First Heatwave Expected Next Week HerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFinding The Right Type Of Workout For You According AstrologyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRobert Irwin Recreates His Father’s Iconic PhotosHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribelast_img read more

Read More →

Donegal group welcome €2m for Autism Plan

first_img FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Twitter Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Donegal group welcome €2m for Autism Plan Pinterest Previous articleVandalism to local traffic lights causing major problemsNext articleGardai investigating weekend fire in Letterkenny News Highland AudioHomepage BannerNewscenter_img Facebook Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th By News Highland – October 14, 2019 Twitter Google+ A Donegal Group has given a broad welcome to confirmation that €2 million has been secured in Budget 2020 for the Autism Plan.Health Minister Simon Harris has stated that over the next year, the additional funding secured will be used in a number of priority areas.This includes implementing a programme of awareness raising and building capacity and competence amongst key professionals working with autism.The Autism Family Support Group Letterkenny Secretary is Eamon Kavanagh:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/eamongfhgfgfhgfkavanagh.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

Read More →

Is it time to take a break?

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Is it time to take a break?On 23 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Taking time out or a tactical career break can be the best way to learn thenew life and business skills that the modern HR director needs.  We speak to five individuals who havebravely added this new perspective – not always by choice.  Sue Weekes reportsThe Gap YearSusan May, 31 Current status: Recently appointed manager, group HR at Centrica. Brief biography: May spent 10 years in HR with BT after graduating ineconomics. During her time there she held both HR operations and line managerpositions and most recently was HR account manager for BT operations. Thedivision restructured and in March last year and she took voluntary redundancyat the age of 30. The break: May took the redundancy after deciding “to take mygap year 10 years late”. She planned to go off travelling but wanted to domore than just visit other countries. “I wanted to do something that wouldbe more beneficial. I wanted to use my skills but in a way that took me outsidemy comfort zone.” May’s personal objectives tied in perfectly with those of RaleighInternational, the youth development charity that organises expeditions aroundthe world for those aged between 18 and 25. She applied to be a staff memberand, after an arduous selection procedure involving camping out and night-timeorientation exercises, she was given a job as project manager. She opted to goto Belize – “It’s got a really dramatic landscape and it has the secondbiggest barrier reef in the world”, she says – and was appointed to anenvironmental project with her group being given the task of building a 70ftbridge and a cultural centre for a local Mayan community. In addition to the international team of 36 venturers, which ranged fromex-offenders sponsored by the UK Government to former public school students ona gap year, May had an assistant project manager (a former ballerina who hadretired at 30) and a medic, but the buck stopped with her. She frequently hadto make use of her HR skills. She explains, “I had to have one-to-ones with the team and found myselfwriting appraisals in the jungle.” The main difficulty the group had to face was transferring to differentprojects because there wasn’t enough work for them to do on the initial onethey were assigned to. There were also some difficulties with locals. “Itwas a case of crisis management in the jungle,” says May, adding thatother problems to hit the workforce included one team member getting bitten bya scorpion and another injuring themselves with an axe. “And there wasalways the possibility that an individual could go stir crazy in the jungle ifthey’re not kept busy,” she says. Despite all this, May would definitely recommend the experience toothers.”You just have to be prepared to throw yourself into the unknown inan extreme environment,” she says. “It increases confidence and makesyou feel like you can have a go at anything. It’s also excellent in terms ofdeveloping people skills.” What’s next? The senior HR role she has taken is an international oneand this, she says, is important to her. So how have potential employers viewedthe Raleigh International experience? “It proves a big talking point ininterviews,” she says, adding: “As a recruiter myself I’d certainlylook favourably on something like that because it shows initiative. It alsotaught me how to manage a budget of 20p per person a day.” Internal DiversificationPaul Kennedy, 37 Current status: Director of HR strategy and associate development,Rosenbluth International. Brief biography: Kennedy began his career at the London Borough ofEnfield in the operations side of leisure services and finished up as HRmanager. Following this, he moved as HR manager to executive travel companyRosenbluth, which has more than 700 associates across Europe. He went on tobecome director of HR in late 1997, with policy-making responsibilities acrossEurope, the Middle East, Africa and India at a time when the company made sevenacquisitions and set up two new start-ups. In late 1999 his career took a twist when he accepted the position of directorofbusiness development with profit and loss accountability for the regionsalready mentioned. The break: Included in Kennedy’s business development role was thebrief to do such a good job that his position would become redundant (he wasalways going to return to HR) so he had to ensure the country managersreporting to him were self-sufficient. “I spent a lot of time with seniormanagers and put them through training, coaching and mentoring so they couldstand alone,” explains Kennedy. “It was also good for my own personaldevelopment because I learnt an awful lot about business. It gave me anopportunity to hone my business skills as well as deploy suitable people-drivenskills to other people.” In February this year Kennedy returned to his roots as director of HRstrategy from his broader business role where there was no need to replace himbecause he had met the brief of making his role obsolete. Since his return toHR, the department and business are much closer than they’ve ever been he says.”People [outside HR] come to me for advice and my opinion since myexposure to broader business issues. They also use me as a listeningboard,” he says, adding, “I’ve earned more credit and trust. Peopleknow when I give advice it’s not just contributed from a personnel standpoint.As HR director, I’m now also part of a sales team and a sales pitch.” The first thing he did on his return to HR was to invest in a bigger HRteam, appointing three general managers for the UK, central Europe and theremaining countries. “I wanted to put new people and new structures inplace having had a detailed insight into where the pressure points were,”says Kennedy. Kennedy agrees that some HR traditionalists may challenge this broader rolebut believes that you can’t be a true HR professional today unless youunderstand the mechanism of business. That said, he ensures that the coretouchy-feely HR skills are still very much part of his armoury, taking time outto visit someone different in the company every day. “You have to knowwhat kind of things are impacting on people in their daily lives,” hesays. Tangible benefits of his approach include employee turnover being halved to12 per cent and innovations such as Associate Appreciation Month (employees areknown as associates), where staff enjoy activities such as barbecues and tripsto the zoo. This has earned him the titles Minister of Fun and vice-presidentof global happiness. What next? At the moment Kennedy is happy to stay in his current roleand his message to others is “to take time out to look into the businessside of things and change what you do in your job if you can”. Interim managementPeter Cox, 48 Current status: Interim sales and marketing director, SportBusinessGroup. Brief biography: Cox has a long and proven track record as HRdirector in the retail sector, having worked at Dixons Stores, Safeway,Sainsbury’s and Marks & Spencer. After over four years at Dixons Stores,and having felt he’d “done retail”, he decided to set up his own managementconsultancy and has been working as an interim manager through Courtenay andCalibreOne.com. The break: Cox has always believed that HR is a commercial functionand his time as an interim manager at a range of companies since 1997 hasreinforced this view. “HR directors can have a very positive role to playin terms of being a mentor but they should also understand where the businesswants to go. This is exaggerated in my case because I’m working as an HRconsultant.” Cox enjoys going into a company and applying what he calls a goodbusiness template and principles of good management and admits he has had tolearn more generalist management skills over the past few years. While at ChubbInformation Security (July 2000 to April this year), where he worked as vice-presidentof business and professional services, he was part of a team involved in a newmedia spin-off. He was responsible not just for HR, but also marketing and commercialprofessional activities such as education and risk assessment. He was also involvedin the corporate website and contract management. Similarly, a spell at MadgeNetworks as global vice-president of HR and information systems _ actually apermanent position which only lasted a year – saw his remit extend beyond HR,being responsible for the organisational changes required to convert Madge froma technology manufacturer to an Internet services company. This includedleading two acquisitions and three downsizing activities. “I don’t seemyself as an interim manager. I am change oriented and I’m commerciallyoriented,” he explains. “Constant development is a hallmark of a goodcompany and I’m at my happiest in an organisation like this,” he says. “I see interim as one particular method of employment out of a widerange of options – including full-time, part-time, temp, consultancy etc. SinceI have been employed in the past through a number of different types ofcontracts, I’d expect a similar level of variety the future. I suppose what I’msaying is I don’t really see interim as a profession in its own right, merely aparticular contractual status – though it is fair to say that such a contractrequires specific skills to make it successful.” What next? While enjoying the interim life, Cox admits it has itsdown side in terms of lack of security and benefits and while he says it hasbeen good to him so far, it is still a month-to-month existence. Consequently amore permanent move could be on the cards though he isn’t putting a timescaleon it,. “My ambition is to be managing director or CEO of an HR business –this would combine my commercial skills and utilise my experience and knowledgeof HR,” he says. last_img read more

Read More →

Vanderburgh County Commissioners January 23, 2018 Meeting Agenda

first_imgPetitioner: Benjamin NiemeierAddress: 8635 N St. Joe RoadRequest: Change from Ag to C-4 with UDC Petitioner: Dianna MillerAddress: 10108 Schaeffer RoadRequest: Change from Ag to C-4 with UDC Old BusinessAmended 2021 Holiday Schedule RezoningFirst Reading of Rezoning Ordinance VC-3-2018 Surplus Request:Adult Probation a Microfiche MachineHealth Department Various EquipmentSuperior Court: Office Furniture Petitioner: Charles & Michelle WakefieldAddress: 5510 Booker RoadRequest: Change from C-2 to R-1AdjournmentFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare County Clerk: December 2017 Monthly ReportTravel Request:Soil and Water Conservation District (2)County Engineer (1) County Engineering:Department ReportPay Request #30 University Parkway T.I.F. for the sum of $34,884.90Pay Request #2 Phoenix Commerce T.I.F. for the sum of $9,450.00Claims County Commissioners:  Sales Agreement for Tekoppel Ave. Property2018 Township Trustee Standards:KnightCenterPerry County Treasurer: December 2017 Monthly ReportBurdette Park:2018 Proposed Park Rental RatesCoin Changer for Aquatic Center civic center AGENDA Of Vanderburgh CountyBoard of CommissionersJanuary 23, 2018, at 3:00 pm, Room 301Call to OrderAttendancePledge of AllegianceAction Items First Reading of Ordinance CO.02-18-007: Amending Chapter 2.48 of Vanderburgh County Code on Information Technology Advisory CommitteeFinal Reading of Ordinance CO.01-18-005 As Amended: Establishing A Parental Leave PolicyFinal Reading of Ordinance CO.01-18-006: Regarding Group Health Insurance for Retired County Employees Final Reading of Rezoning Ordinance VC-2-2018 Public CommentConsent ItemsContracts, Agreements, and LeasesCommunity Corrections: Letter of Support of the FY 2019 Grant Application to the Indiana Dept. of CorrectionsSuperior Court: Service Contracts  YWCAAlbion Bacon Fellows Center Final Reading of Rezoning Ordinance VC-1-2018 Board Appointments Department Head ReportsNew BusinessRoad Hearing County Commissioners: County Towing and Storage Contract with Hamrick’s Towing & Recovery, LLCSuperior Court, Juvenile Division: 2018 CASA ContractCollective Bargaining Agreement with the TeamstersDrug and Alcohol Deferral Service Contract with Jennifer BellBurdette Park: 2018 Oswald Marketing Contract Approval of January 9, 2018, Meeting MinutesEmployment ChangesRoad Closure Request:Logan’s PromiseUSI Screaming Eagles Running Serieslast_img read more

Read More →

News story: Eddystone and Red Eagle report published

first_imgMAIB’s report of the unintentional release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fixed fire-extinguishing system on board the roll on, roll off (ro-ro) cargo vessel Eddystone in June 2016 and a similar incident on board the ro-ro passenger ferry Red Eagle in July 2017, is now published.The report contains details of what happened, the subsequent actions taken and recommendation made: read more. Press enquiries during office hours 01932 440015 Press enquiries out of hours 020 7944 4292center_img Press enquirieslast_img read more

Read More →