Concentric fungal rings in antarctic moss communities

first_imgCertain Antarctic moss communities often have a pattern of concentric arcs or rings on their surfaces which can be up to 5 m in diameter. These are caused by fungal infection and show many similarities to those previously reported from the Arctic. The fungus appears not to spread through the moss uniformly but in a series of rapid advances, resulting in parallel stripes of infected moss; the reasons for this pattern remain unclear. During the seasons studied 2–6 infection stripes were produced per year, resulting in an average rate of advance of 8 cm yr−1. Three species of ascomycete have been found associated with these rings.last_img read more

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Equinor sets target to reach net-zero emissions by 2050

first_imgThe Norwegian majority state-owned energy firm said it’s commitment demonstrates the company’s continued commitment to “long-term value creation” in support of the Paris Agreement Equinor “well positioned” to reach net-zero emissions targetWhile Equinor has been ramping up its efforts to reduce emissions, the company has also outlined a “value-driven strategy for significant growth within renewables”.It said these steps will help it to continue delivering on the short and mid-term ambitions that will be “key to achieving net-zero emissions”.Opedal claims that for years the energy firm has “demonstrated an ability to deliver on climate ambitions” and has a “strong track record on lowering emissions from oil and gas”.It expects to deliver an average annual oil and gas production growth of about 3% from 2019 to 2026.Equinor believes it is “well positioned” to reach the net-zero target because it holds “world-class global assets in attractive areas with substantial value creation potential”.While Equinor has been ramping up its efforts to reduce emissions, the company has also outlined a “value-driven strategy for significant growth within renewables” (Credit: Flickr/mmatsuura)By optimising its portfolio through financial discipline and prioritisation, the company said it will continue to develop “competitive and resilient projects” while maintaining “industry-leading” recovery rates, unit costs and carbon efficiency.It believes the net-zero ambition will strengthen “future competitiveness and value creation at the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS)” and confirmed that its plans for production, development and exploration at the NCS will still “remain firm”.As the world looks to reduce emissions and investor appetite continues to strengthen for renewable technologies, Equinor said it is preparing for an “expected gradual decline in global demand for oil and gas from around 2030 onwards”.It added that value creation, rather than volume replacement, is and will be guiding the firm’s decisions, while in the longer term, it expects to “produce less oil and gas than today”. Equinor boss Anders Opedal said his firm wants to be a “leading company” in the energy transition (Credit: Equinor/Ole Jørgen Bratland) Equinor has today (2 November) announced its ambition to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 as part of its plans to become a “broad energy company”.The Norwegian majority state-owned energy firm’s commitment builds upon its goals presented earlier this year to achieve carbon neutral global operations by 2030 and to reduce its absolute greenhouse gas emissions in Norway to near zero by 2050.Equinor said its latest pledge, which includes emissions from production and final consumption of energy, sets a “clear strategic direction” and demonstrates the company’s continued commitment to “long-term value creation” in support of the Paris Agreement – an international climate pact that aims to limit the rise in global temperatures to “well below” 2C by 2100.Anders Opedal, who took over the position as Equinor CEO and president today, said the company is committed to being a “leader in the energy transition”.He added: “It is a sound business strategy to ensure long-term competitiveness during a period of profound changes in the energy systems as society moves towards net zero.“Over the coming months, we will update our strategy to continue to create value for our shareholders and to realise this ambition.”center_img Renewables a “significant growth area” for EquinorAs part of its plans to develop as a “broad energy company”, Equinor highlights renewables as a “significant growth area”.It has previously set ambitions for profitable growth within renewables and expects a production capacity of between 4 gigawatts (GW) and 6 GW by 2026, with the hope of reaching between 12 GW and 16 GW by 2035.The energy firm said it will do this by expanding its acquisition of wind acreage, with the aim of “accelerating profitable growth” and continuing to leverage its position as one of the driving forces in the offshore wind sector.It claims that to achieve net-zero emissions requires a “well-functioning market” for carbon capture and storage (CCS) and natural sinks, as well as the development of “competitive technologies” for hydrogen.Building on its capabilities from oil and gas, Equinor said it is well positioned to provide low-carbon technologies and establish zero-emission value chains.The company is already looking to drive the development of these types of technologies through projects such as the Northern Lights, which aims to store CO2 from industrial sites across Europe and is part of the Norwegian government’s Longship CCS project.Equinor said it also assumes that an “increasing share” of oil and gas will be used for petrochemicals towards 2050.Opedal believes that climate change is a “shared challenge” and that the combined efforts of governments, industries, investors and consumers are “crucial to reaching net-zero emissions, for Equinor and for society”.He added: “Together, we can overcome technological and commercial challenges, cut emissions, and develop CCS and zero-emission value chains for a net-zero future.”last_img read more

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USS Higgins deploys to Asia, Middle East

first_img Authorities Share this article USS Higgins deploys to Asia, Middle East View post tag: USS Higgins November 21, 2017center_img US guided-missile destroyer USS Higgins (DDG 76) got underway from San Diego on November 20 to start a regularly scheduled independent deployment to the US 7th Fleet and 5th Fleet areas of operation.Higgins has a crew of nearly 330 sailors, officers and enlisted, and is a multi-mission ship designed to operate independently or with an associated strike group.The deployment follows a maintenance phase and training cycle, wherein Higgins proved itself operationally capable of carrying out its mission as a deployed ballistic missile defense (BMD) asset.“My team of warriors demonstrated they are smart and brave during the challenging work up cycle, and are eager to stand the watch over the horizon,” said Commander Victor Garza, commanding cfficer of Higgins.BMD capable guided-missile destroyers provide a flexibility to combatant commanders and are able to carry out assigned BMD missions while still being ready to respond to other operational tasking such as maritime interdiction operations, air defense, and multinational exercises.Higgins is homeported in San Diego and is part of Naval Surface Forces and US 3rd Fleet. View post tag: US Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Higgins deploys to Asia, Middle East last_img read more

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Arts First at 25

first_imgMegan has been at the helm of 16 Arts First festivals, including the upcoming 25th, which kicks off Thursday with the event’s founder, actor John Lithgow ’67, Art.D. ’05, receiving this year’s Harvard Arts Medal.Unmistakable in Arts First is a “joyousness and sense of possibility,” said Megan. The festival, he added, has created transformative experiences for students while also serving to connect disparate parts of the Harvard community — the Harvard Art Museums with the American Repertory Theater, classes across the arts and humanities, and countless other collaborators.“At its core, Arts First celebrates student art-making,” Megan said. “The energy of this has been generative. Over the years, it has drawn our attention again and again to the importance of the arts to our students and in the world generally.“We have 3,000 students who participate in the arts — nearly half of the undergraduate student body. This commitment has been magnetic, pulling us toward opportunities to grow, to create curriculum, to explore new forms of learning through different modalities and creative endeavors. And, of course, it’s been incredible to have a president who recognizes the inherent importance of the arts and who responds so genuinely to the students’ passion for art-making. That has been a game-changer.”Hasty Pudding actors roast Jack Megan (right), director of the Office For the Arts, at the 20th Arts First Festival in 2012. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerAmong the artistic alums returning to campus for the festival is composer Nicholas Britell ’03, whose score for “Moonlight” was nominated for an Academy Award.“The environment Harvard creates is so important,” said Britell, who will perform at Friday’s “Celebration of Harvard Artists” at Sanders Theatre. “It recognizes that the arts can have a dual purpose: first and foremost, as a profound communication of human experience. Yet additionally, as we are learning more and more, the arts offer real practical benefits as well. Musical and arts education can have powerful cognitive benefits, especially early in life. The arts are such a critical part of experiencing the world.”Organizers began work on this year’s celebration last summer. More than 120 student groups across the University have planned more than 150 performances, including dance, comedy, and concerts. There will be 30 visual art exhibitions. OFA has ordered more than 2,000 T-shirts for volunteers and participants.“The challenge is to always make it new and fresh,” said Megan. “For example, we have more practicing artists on the faculty, and we want to celebrate that. Vijay Iyer, a transformative force himself in our arts community, performed with his band on the Science Center Plaza in 2014. Yosvany Terry will play this year. We have also had the great joy of showcasing the masterful work of two vital resident ensembles: the musicians of the Silk Road, and the Parker Quartet. This level of involvement signals an exciting change at Harvard.”A Bach Society Orchestra performance of “Appalachian Spring” gave Myra Mayman one of her most unforgettable Arts First memories. The founding director of the OFA recalled the Aaron Copland suite, performed in Sanders Theatre years ago with a pit orchestra, as “an extraordinary moment.”“I was sitting across from Ivan Tcherepnin [the late music professor] and it was so much the sound of tendrils coming up through the earth and this delicate transitory moment of spring arriving,” she said. “It was hair-raising and we exchanged smiles because it was so apt.”Still, Mayman couldn’t settle on a single favorite Arts First experience. She recalled a group of visual arts students who re-created Manet’s “Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe” in a tableau vivant featuring two women, one naked and looking out at the viewer, the other a scantily clad bather picnicking with dressed men.Myra Mayman plays the cymbals in the “1812 Overture” during a surprise tribute to her at Loeb House by the Arts First Planning Committee and the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra in 2001. File photo by Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer“I got a call from one of the women, who wanted to know if it was OK to be naked,” said Mayman. “She ended up using discreet camouflage.”Credit for the inclusive and joyful celebration belongs in part to former Harvard President Neil Rudenstine, a staunch supporter of the arts who knew the idea had “real purpose.”“I knew this would be a major event, but also hoped — and I think it proved to be the case — that it would be a moment when all the arts groups felt they needed to perform in the best possible way,” he said. “They worked incredibly hard, turned in superb performances, and people came.”As recalled by Mayman, Rudenstine’s own inaugural, in 1991 — a weekend of performances with writers and musicians — served as a framework for Arts First, with Lithgow, an overseer at the time, the playmaker.“John asked, ‘Can you run an arts festival?,’ and I said, ‘Yes, as long as I can hire a producer,’” she said. “It was because of John that it happened. No one could say no to John Lithgow. No one on the planet.”Sam Wu ’17 has been involved in Arts First since freshman year. The joint East Asian studies and music concentrator called the festival “a big part of my art-making experience.”In 2015, Wu staged a musical and visual art experience in the Calderwood Courtyard with his original work “Passacaglia, en pointe” for cello and harp accompanied by ballet dancers. In addition, a friend from Yale performed “Tree of Life,” a Wu composition for piano, while another artist friend painted on a canvas dropped from a tree.For this year’s festival, Wu is collaborating with the same friends on a neurotechnology-based interactive installation called “still.”“I believe in thinking beyond my own art form to really see how I can express things beyond music,” said the 21-year-old Adams House resident. “I believe in the physical aspect of music and feeling it in a visceral matter. Most times I can only imagine that, but I could see how the musical manifestation came to life with those performances, and Arts First allowed me to try something like that.”Harvard Arts Medal recipient John Updike ’54 (right) talks with John Lithgow at Lowell House in 1998. Photo by Paula LernerThe 25th festival will also include group and individual performances from the Graduate School of Design, the Ed School, the Divinity School, the Law School, the Medical School, and the School of Public Health. Wu, who grew up in China, said watching different disciplines collaborate is as much fun as being on stage.“Sometimes you see something you haven’t seen before, and that is as exciting as sharing my work,” he said. “It’s one of the best times to be part of Harvard.”These experiences have staying power. Cici Yu ’13, worked on Arts First all four years on campus, sometimes performing, always working behind the scenes, most notably as layout designer for the festival guide from sophomore through senior year.“What’s exciting for me is the production, the months of planning — organizing rehearsals, grant writing, going back and forth on ideas, arguing,” said the 26-year-old, who now teaches high school math in Chelsea. “That’s the fun part of the art-making.”Since graduating, Yu has returned to campus for every Arts First — and not just for the free T-shirt.“I like seeing what’s going on under the tent, the public art on display, and watching a cappella performances,” she said. “It’s free and outside, and students create really thoughtful work — things that make you stop and wonder.” John Lithgow: An actor’s journey In interview, arts medalist recalls life on stage, screen, and at Harvard Related It isn’t an overstatement to say that Arts First has had a profound effect on the tens of thousands of students who have participated in the annual spring festival.“I am always struck at each year’s festival that while some of the students will become gifted professional artists, many others will be future leaders in medicine and public health, education, and law,” said Jack Megan, director of the Office For the Arts (OFA). “Yet for each of them, participating in Arts First is important. Making art is meaningful. Their undergraduate years are our last best shot at engaging them in arts practice before they head out into the world. If we can do that, the world they enter will be the better for it.”last_img read more

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Finding the Sweet Spot When It Comes to Your Server Refresh Cycle

first_imgNothing lasts forever. Despite the rumors, even Twinkies have a limited shelf life.Which is why the server refresh cycle is so important for organizations today. Servers don’t last forever, and waiting too long to replace can result in downtime and put your core business functions at risk. But on the flip side, if you refresh too soon and for the wrong reasons, it could be a costly decision that eats up most of your IT budget.So How Do You Find That Server Refresh “Sweet Spot”? When it comes to server refresh, there are plenty of factors to consider. Cost, frequently run applications, IT staff, current infrastructure, growth objectives, and your plans for emerging workloads all come into play. Unfortunately, with a server refresh, there is no magical, one-size-fits-all answer. The best time to refresh your servers is based on your organization’s unique needs and long-term goals. There are obvious costs associated with modernizing your on-premise infrastructure. But there are also substantial costs to NOT doing it. By continuing to run legacy hardware, you could be putting your organization at risk.In the past, the average server refresh cycle was about 5 years. But that timeline has shifted. Today, it’s not uncommon for businesses to refresh on a 3-year cycle to keep up with modern technology. These companies aren’t just refreshing for the fun of it (although we agree that new servers and data center toys ARE exciting) – they’re doing so to meet increasing demands and strategically position themselves to handle new innovations of the future. They know they need to modernize to remain competitive and prepare for the new technologies.Benefits of a Server RefreshModern servers are made specifically to handle emerging workloads. For example, the PowerEdge MX7000 features a Dell EMC kinetic infrastructure, which means that shared pools of disaggregated compute, storage, and fabric resources can be configured – and then reconfigured – to specific workload needs and requirements.In addition to handling data-intense workloads, replacing servers and other critical hardware reduces downtime and greatly reduces the risk of server failure. Improved reliability means that your IT staff spends less time on routine maintenance, freeing them up to focus on things that add value to the business.Additionally, newer servers provide greater flexibility and give you the opportunity to scale as needed based on changing demands. Some workloads, especially mission-critical applications, are best run on-premises, and a modernized infrastructure makes it easier to adapt and deploy new applications. A recent study by Forrester found that Modernized firms are more than twice as likely as Aging firms to cite faster application updates and improved infrastructure scalability.[1]Modernized servers also enable you to virtualize. By layering software capabilities over hardware, you can create a data center where all the hardware is virtualized and controlled through software. This helps improve traditional server utilization (which is typically less than 15% of capacity without virtualization).A server refresh presents a tremendous opportunity to improve your IT capabilities. New servers help you to remain competitive and position you for future data growth, innovative technologies, and demanding workloads that require systems integration.For more information about the benefits of server refresh, download the Forrester study Why Faster Refresh Cycles and Modern Infrastructure Management Are Critical to Business Success or contact a Dell EMC representative today. To learn more about PowerEdge, visit dellemc.com/servers, or join the conversation on Twitter @DellEMCservers.[1] A commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting on behalf of Dell EMC, “Why Faster Refresh Cycles and Modern Infrastructure Management Are Critical to Business Success,” May 2019.last_img read more

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Avoid the card cons

first_imgBy Cat HolmesUniversity of GeorgiaFinding the right gift for certain folks can be tricky: How do you know which books Aunt Sue has already read? For many, a gift card seems the perfect solution to these dilemmas.While gift cards have become an increasingly popular gift choice for the holidays, University of Georgia consumer economics specialist Michael Rupured warns of some “sneaky little practices” some companies employ.Retailers like stored-value gift cards because they’re easier and cheaper to handle and harder to counterfeit.Shoppers seem to like them, too. Gift card sales are expected to increase by as much as 15 percent this year to nearly $45 billion. Whether you’re giving or getting gift cards, be sure you understand how they work.There are pros and cons to gift cards. Consumers need to be aware of these to make informed decisions, Rupured said.Gift cards, or “stored-value cards,” as Rupured says they are properly called, look like credit cards, with a magnetized strip on the back that stores information on how much the card is worth.Some cards can be used at the store of purchase, others at certain malls or shopping centers. Still others can be used anywhere major credit cards are accepted.”They’re certainly a very convenient concept,” Rupured said. “Who remembered to carry around paper gift certificates?”However, Rupured notes that when a paper gift certificate was cashed, any remaining credit was returned to the gift certificate holder in cash. With gift cards, the unspent remainder stays on the card until it’s used up, so all of the money goes to the retailer.Watch for delayed fees. Some issuers begin charging fees ($1 to $2.50) after a specified time period if the card hasn’t been used or used up. These fees may kick in as early as six months from the date of purchase and can quickly eat up the value, particularly for low-value ($5-$25) cards.Consider the cost. Gift cards from major retailers are usually free. Gift cards that can be used at multiple retailers sometimes come with a small fee. You may be charged to check your balance, so be sure to keep track of how much you spend.Don’t lose the card. If a gift card is lost or stolen, you may not be able to replace it. Some retailers charge a replacement fee, provided you have proof of purchase (such as a sales receipt) and the card’s ID number.Use the card. About 10 percent of gift cards are never redeemed. That’s a gift to retailers of more than $4 billion that you probably didn’t want to give.(Cat Holmes is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Trump’s Refusal to Concede – The New York Times

first_imgWant to get The Morning by email? Here’s the sign-up.Good morning. A president is trying to undo an election result: How would you describe that situation in another country? Let’s try that exercise now. Imagine that a president of another country lost an election and refused to concede defeat. Instead, he lied about the vote count. He then filed lawsuits to have ballots thrown out, put pressure on other officials to back him up and used the power of government to prevent a transition of power from starting.How would you describe this behavior? It’s certainly anti-democratic. It is an attempt to overrule the will of the people, ignore a country’s laws and illegitimately grab political power.President Trump’s efforts will probably fail, but they are unlike anything that living Americans have experienced. “What we have seen in the last week from the president more closely resembles the tactics of the kind of authoritarian leaders we follow,” Michael Abramowitz, the president of Freedom House, which tracks democracy, told The Times. “I never would have imagined seeing something like this in America.” – Advertisement – Can a cult brand survive going corporate?Supreme, a streetwear company, is so popular that fans wait hours in line to buy its gear, like T-shirts stamped with Kate Moss’s face or branded bricks (for show, not construction). The company deliberately restricts the supply of its products, creating hot resale markets. At one point, those bricks were selling for $1,000 on eBay.This week, VF Corporation — which owns brands including the North Face and Vans — announced that it was buying Supreme for $2.1 billion. The deal is another marker of the brand’s success, and the lucrativeness of the streetwear market in general. But it has also left fans and industry analysts wondering: How will Supreme stay cool when it’s part of a giant corporation?Supreme and VF hope that part of the answer involves growth overseas, potentially in countries like China. “Rather than saturate U.S. malls, which would certainly hurt the brand, Supreme and VF Corp. appear to have their sights set on areas where they can expand without much effect on the perceived exclusivity in established markets,” Marc Bain writes at Quartz.Another answer may be that Supreme, which began in 1994 as a single New York storefront geared toward skateboarders, won’t stay cool in the same way — but that nothing does forever. – Advertisement – The two crucial next steps are the certification of state election results and the appointment of Electoral College voters, as Andrew Prokop of Vox explains. Both must happen by mid-December. If Republican officials in some states interfere — say, by trying to appoint electors who ignore the election results and vote for Trump in states he lost — it will be a sign that his attempt to undo the election has reached a more serious stage.Eventually, Republican officials will be forced to make a choice, The Washington Post’s Greg Sargent writes — between breaking with Trump and breaking with democracy. Democracy seems much more likely to prevail, but in a damaged state. “Millions of his supporters,” my colleague Maggie Haberman writes, “will believe what he says.”Max Fisher, another colleague, offered the following on Twitter yesterday: THE LATEST NEWSThe Election Coarsely crushed black peppercorns are key to this beef and cabbage stir-fry. They add a spicy bite to the beef, balanced by a simple rub of garlic, brown sugar and salt.What to ReadHilary Holladay’s “The Power of Adrienne Rich” is the first proper biography of the influential poet. It’s full of fascinating details, from Rich’s beginnings as a child prodigy (she played Mozart on the piano and dictated stories by the age of 4) to her political awakening later in life as a feminist.Late NightThe late-night hosts applauded Biden’s comments that Trump’s refusal to concede was embarrassing.Now time to play “Perhaps this simply marks the end of the inevitable journey that comes to all great disruptive brands that begin life as outsiders. They subvert the status quo only to pique the interest of the dominant players, who absorb their strategies and then go on to absorb the actual source,” The Times’s fashion critic Vanessa Friedman writes. “Fashion is great at that.”PLAY, WATCH, EATWhat to Cook The pangrams from yesterday’s Spelling Bee were grandpop and propaganda. Today’s puzzle is above — or you can play online if you have a Games subscription.Here’s today’s Mini Crossword, and a clue: 180° from NNW (three letters). It is “one of the gravest threats to democracy” the country has faced, Ryan Enos, a Harvard social scientist, wrote yesterday. He added in an email, “The result is crystal clear and, yet, the incumbent is creating ambiguity by baseless claims.”I asked political scientists and historians for analogies, and they offered a few. The ruling party in Mexico probably reversed the true election result in 1988, as did ruling parties in Zimbabwe in 2002, Iran in 2009 and maybe Russia in 1996, Steven Levitsky, a co-author of “How Democracies Die,” told me. The details were different — the fraud sometimes occurred before the results were announced — but all were cases of politicians stealing an election mostly without military force.The closest U.S. comparisons are more than a century old. The Federalist Party considered depriving Thomas Jefferson of the presidency in 1800 and used the courts to weaken him. During Reconstruction, parts of the South overturned election results, sometimes through violence. And of course multiple states responded to Abraham Lincoln’s 1860 victory by seceding from the union. (Thomas Edsall’s latest Times column has more details on each of these.)- Advertisement – What happens next? Republican officials seem to be trying to finesse the situation. They want to avoid angering Trump, who remains popular with Republican voters, as Liam Donovan, a party strategist, notes. That helps explain why most Republican officials have refused to recognize Joe Biden as the president-elect and have made vaguely supportive comments about Trump’s false claims.But this support seems halfhearted. Few Republicans are taking their own steps to reverse the election result. Thanks for spending part of your morning with The Times. See you tomorrow. — DavidA correction: On Tuesday, we misstated Emily Harrington’s achievement in Yosemite National Park. She was the first woman to free-climb El Capitan’s Golden Gate route in less than 24 hours. The first woman to free-climb the mountain so quickly was Lynn Hill, in 1994.P.S. The Times has named Anton Troianovski its next Moscow bureau chief, one of the most storied posts for foreign correspondents.You can see today’s print front page here. Today’s episode of “The Daily” is about the race to develop a coronavirus vaccine. On the latest “Modern Love” podcast, the secrets that can end relationships.Melina Delkic, Claire Moses, Ian Prasad Philbrick and Sanam Yar contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at [email protected] up here to get this newsletter in your inbox. Snout Science: Researchers have developed facial recognition for bears, identifying them through features including their eyes, nose tip and ears. Ecologists hope the technology will help them keep track of the size and activity of bear populations.From Opinion: It’s time for the N.C.A.A. to pay college athletes, argues John Thompson Jr., Georgetown University’s former basketball coach, in an excerpt from his posthumous autobiography.Lives Lived: David Toole learned to dance expressively long after his legs were amputated. He performed with various troupes and achieved global renown as a featured dancer in the opening ceremony of the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. He died at 56. A thought experimentThe political scientist Brendan Nyhan has often responded to events during the Trump presidency by asking a question: What would you say if you saw it in another country?- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Together forever

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What Mikel Arteta told Mesut Ozil and Arsenal players on pitch after Manchester United win

first_imgMikel Arteta calls for Arsenal’s players to salute the fans together (Picture: BT Sport)Arteta shared another touching moment with Reiss Nelson and then a group hug with Ainsley Maitland-Niles and Granit Xhaka before yelling at the players, ‘together!’ and urging them to salute the fans in unison and applaud the vociferous support they had received.Arsenal’s squad has often been accused of being disunited, but they fought hard for each other on the pitch against United and celebrated just as hard afterwards, with Arteta clearly keen to forge a tight bond.The result gets Arteta’s 2020 off to the perfect start and ends a run of four defeats in a row at the Emirates, while the win sees them move back into the top half of the table and nine points adrift of the top-four places.MORE: Eddie Nketiah sends class message to Leeds United fans after returning to ArsenalMORE: Leipzig send message to Arsenal over Dayot Upamecano transferMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City Ozil had a big smile on his face as Arteta made his way over (Picture: BT Sport)When the full-time whistle went, Arteta exploded with emotion and shook hands and hugged the players in the dugout as well as his coaching staff.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTHe quickly made a beeline for Ozil, who gave an excellent display, and embraced the German playmaker before telling him: ‘Well done. Well played!’Arteta then walked towards other players, praising Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang despite the club’s topscorer failing to get on the score sheet in an otherwise lively performance. What Mikel Arteta told Mesut Ozil and Arsenal players on pitch after Manchester United win Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 1 Jan 2020 10:16 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link15kShares Advertisementcenter_img The Spanish coach was delighted with his side’s victory (Picture: BT Sport)Mikel Arteta congratulated his Arsenal players – and Mesut Ozil in particular – on their excellent performances and work rate in the side’s New Year’s Day win over Manchester United.The Gunners had not won a Premier League game at the Emirates since the start of October but gave an impressive display against United, with Arteta picking up his first win since taking over the managerial reins.Summer signing Nicolas Pepe got the scoring under way early on, while Sokratis doubled the lead in the first half – with the side defending resolutely in the second period to see out a 2-0 win. Advertisement Commentlast_img read more

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Belgium adopts IORP II law with transitional measures

first_imgThe regulator, the FMSA, is understood to be preparing the publication of several “circulars” to provide further explanation and guidance about IORP II implementation, some of which are due out this quarter.The key IORP II implementation elements for Belgian pension funds, according to Sommerijns, were the risk management function and own risk assessment requirements.“This is new for the pension funds,” she said.Although they already had several risk functions and addressed certain risks – for example in the statement of investment principles or via the compliance officer or internal auditor – Belgian pension funds were not required to have a centralised, co-ordinated risk management function.“This is where we expect the most input and most ‘translation-into-practice’ of what the FMSA circular will look like,” said Sommerijns.The regulator had indicated it would be open to comments and suggestions from the industry, she added.Parliamentary problems Source: European ParliamentCharles Michel, former Belgian prime ministerBelgium’s IORP II transposition law was voted on 20 December, two days after the Belgian prime minister, Charles Michel, tendered his resignation in response to a vote of no confidence being proposed in his government. The king accepted his resignation on 21 December, and Belgium is now under a caretaker government.Michel’s resignation followed a disagreement over a UN migration pact, which led to the federal coalition government losing its majority after five ministers from the right-wing party N-VA walked out. Michel tried to continue with a minority government, but failed to secure parliamentary backing.Transitional measuresThe IORP II law passed by parliament before the winter holidays included transitional measures in response to industry requests, one of which relates to the risk management function.It stated that pension funds had until the end of 2019 to fill the role, but needed to give the FMSA three months’ notice of their choice, to allow the regulator to make sure a “fit and proper” person had been appointed.Sommerijins has advised pension funds to ask whoever they had appointed to fulfil the risk function to produce a report covering the entire 2019 calendar year to ensure they fully complied with the EU directive. Another transitional measure gave Belgian occupational pension funds two years to formally adapt or introduce documentation to meet new requirements, for example in relation to the statement of investment principles or the own risk assessment. The Belgian parliament has approved the country’s law for implementing the new EU pension fund directive, including transitional measures.The country’s IORP II transposition law enters into force on 13 January, which is also the deadline for individual EU countries to implement the directive into their domestic legislation. Lut Sommerijns, partner at law firm VWEV, suggested it was positive that Belgium had managed to pass legislation implementing the EU directive within the time period set.“I think everyone is happy, but also concerned about the extra work everyone will have,” she added.last_img read more

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