Hoesen’s late goal lifts Quakes over Real Salt Lake 1-0

first_img Associated Press FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Danny Hoesen scored in the third minute of second-half stoppage time to give the San Jose Earthquakes a 1-0 victory over Real Salt Lake on Saturday night.Paul Marie took Cristian Espinoza’s short corner, drove it into the area and sent a cross into the area. Hoesen finished it with a roundhouse kick.Daniel Vega had five saves for the Earthquakes (8-7-4) for his sixth clean sheet of the year.RSL’s Nick Rimando made two saves as he became the first player to appear in 500 MLS regular-season games.Real Salt Lake dropped to 8-9-2. July 6, 2019 /Sports News – Local Hoesen’s late goal lifts Quakes over Real Salt Lake 1-0 Written by Tags: MLS/Real Salt Lake/San Jose Earthquakeslast_img read more

Read More →

My Property Box expands Tees Valley portfolio

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » My Property Box expands Tees Valley portfolio previous nextAgencies & PeopleMy Property Box expands Tees Valley portfolioThe Negotiator29th October 20190318 Views My Property Box has increased its portfolio of rental properties by 20 per cent following the completion of a takeover deal.The move is part of the Darlington based letting agency’s plan to develop business throughout the Tees Valley and comes just seven years after the company was launched – and the number of homes on its books has grown following the takeover of Holt Estate Agents, which had an office in Thornaby. The new headquarters is on Grange Road, Darlington.The company has created its own suite of software, allowing landlords to access contract forms via a smartphone as well as being able to photograph and submit required documents.Tenants also benefit following the development of in-house application software ‘AppTrack’ which allows employment and landlord references, ID checks and credit checks to be gathered more efficiently, reducing the whole completion process.Ben Quaintrell, Managing Director, said, “My Property Box has added more homes to its portfolio as a result of the takeover, which underlines our ambition to continue to grow and make our innovative and comprehensive services available to landlords and tenants across a much wider area.“Having founded the business just seven years ago, I’m hugely excited at this expansion which allows the company to add to our reputation as a trusted lettings agency offering excellent service and expert advice.”Holt Estate Agents AppTrack ID checks credit checks Ben Quaintrell My Property Box software October 29, 2019The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Read More →

Exclusive: Senior industry figure launches unique compliance platform for agents

first_imgHome » News » Exclusive: Senior industry figure launches unique compliance platform for agents previous nextProptechExclusive: Senior industry figure launches unique compliance platform for agentsMichael Stoop has partnered with leading industry compliance figure Caroline Kenny to create a watertight resource for agents to use on their computers or on the go.Nigel Lewis2nd October 202001,047 Views Senior property industry figure Michael Stoop (pictured, above) has launched an online compliance service that enables estate agents to access up-to-date information on the UK’s 170-plus pieces of property legislation.Called Complylex, the platform is available both online and via an optimised smartphone webpage.It gives agents updates on changes to existing legislation and new laws and regulations as well as detailed and accurate guides to keep agents compliant.The service has been developed by Stoop with one of the property industry’s leading legal experts Caroline Kenny, who worked with Stoop at TPFG but who also has strong links to many of the UK’s trade organisations including the NRLA, ARLA Propertymark and UKALA.Complylex has been undergoing pilots at several corporate and agencies including CJ Hole, Martin & Co and Parkers, and Stoop says it’s been well received.It costs £25 a month per branch for up to 15 users but across any number of devices per user.“We felt there was no central resource that offered all the UK’s property legislation in one easy-to-navigate place, but that had been written and checked by a qualified legal team before being published,” says Stoop.Spotify“It’s a bit like Spotify – you may only use it from time to time but you know it’s always there, and there’s no contract.”Stoop says it’s largely aimed at independent agents who don’t have access to large teams of in-house compliance experts in the same way that corporates do.Complylex is only available to estate agents at the moment, but may later be broadened to include landlord and tenants.Complylex Caroline Kenny Martin & Co Parkers Michael Stoop CJ Hole October 2, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Read More →

Champions for financial aid

first_imgAs a financial aid recipient and first-generation college student from Montreal, Tim Barakett had personal experiences that shaped his philanthropy. When he moved into the Yard for his freshman year, he was welcomed into the Harvard community by new classmates from many backgrounds — from his hockey teammates to his Canaday Hall dorm mates. He received a transformative education that extended from the classroom to the rink.“When I was a freshman, my roommates and many of my friends were from profoundly different walks of life — and that was an eye-opening experience for me. We learned so much from each other,” said Barakett. “Harvard’s incredible financial aid program brings this range of life experience and perspective to the student body, which benefits everyone.”Grateful for his opportunities at Harvard, Barakett ’87, M.B.A. ’93, has always felt a responsibility to give back. To help advance the College’s financial aid program, he and his wife, Michele, have donated $25 million to The Harvard Campaign for Arts and Sciences. They have established two new funds for undergraduate students, and committed $1 million to the hockey program that was an important part of Barakett’s undergraduate experience. Their generosity continues a legacy of support for Harvard College that began in 1997 with their first scholarship fund.Their newest endowed scholarship will give the Griffin Financial Aid Office the ability to support the full demonstrated financial need of undergraduates, including tuition, room, board, and other expenses. This expansive fund will provide the flexibility to meet student needs as they change and grow over time.William R. Fitzsimmons, Harvard College dean of admissions and financial aid, said, “As a fellow hockey player, financial aid recipient, and first-generation college student, I met Tim when he first arrived in Cambridge. I know well from personal experience what a difference this kind of flexible financial aid gift can make to students’ lives. Tim’s and Michele’s thoughtfulness, generosity, and commitment to pay it forward mean a great deal to me personally, and I know Tim’s adviser and mentor, the late Fred Jewett ’57, my predecessor as dean of admissions, would have been thrilled.”The Baraketts also have endowed the new startup grant program, which will award $2,000 to every incoming freshman in the Class of 2020 whose family income is $65,000 or less. Announcing the program in March, Harvard President Drew Faust, the Lincoln Professor of History, said, “By investing in financial aid, we want Harvard to be accessible and affordable for the most talented students, no matter their background or financial circumstances. At the start of what surely will be one of the most transformative experiences of their lives, we want to ensure that all students are able to explore what Harvard has to offer.”“The startup grants,” Barakett noted, “are about creating equity, not just providing access, and as such complement scholarship funds. Michele and I want to give students more financial freedom to choose their activities, whatever they may be — doing public service, getting involved in student organizations, or even just the freedom to have dinner in a restaurant with classmates — because these experiences are such an important part of their student life and education. We want to help empower them to create their best Harvard experience, and never to feel they are on the periphery.”This commitment to the entire student experience extends to mentoring his scholars. As chairman and founder of TRB Advisors LP, a private investment firm, Barakett has helped students with professional networking and advising after graduation. This is also why he has taken on leadership roles as an alumnus, serving as a co-chair for financial aid and for The Campaign for Arts and Sciences.“I want to make sure that everyone understands the importance of financial aid and recognizes that the financial aid program is not fully endowed at Harvard. A gift to financial aid has a greater impact than just four years of college for these students. This is an investment in extraordinary students who will leave Harvard and go on to make a significant impact on the world,” said Barakett.Michael D. Smith, the Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, reinforced the impact of this investment, saying, “Our mission of educating citizens and citizen leaders extends beyond the classroom, and Tim and Michele recognize the importance of supporting all aspects of student life. Their generosity will ensure that students can pursue the passions and the ideas that should define their Harvard experience. We couldn’t ask for better champions for financial aid than Tim and Michele.”last_img read more

Read More →

Julie White & More Set for Lisa D’Amour’s Airline Highway on B’way

first_imgTony winner Julie White (The Little Dog Laughed) and more have been tapped for the upcoming Broadway production of Lisa D’Amour’s Airline Highway. Directed by Joe Mantello, Manhattan Theatre Club’s presentation of Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s ensemble production will begin previews on April 1. Opening night is set for April 23 at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre. Joining White as Tanya will be K. Todd Freeman (The Song of Jacob Zulu) as Sissy Na Na, Scott Jaeck (August: Osage County) as Wayne, Ken Marks as Francis (Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark) and Judith Roberts (Orange Is The New Black) as Miss Ruby. Making their Broadway debuts will be Carolyn Braver as Zoe, Caroline Neff as Krista, Tim Edward Rhoze as Terry and Joe Tippett as Bait Boy. Additional casting will be announced soon. Airline Highway is an ode to the outcasts that make life a little more interesting. In the parking lot of The Hummingbird, a once-glamorous motel on New Orleans’ infamous Airline Highway, a group of friends gather. A rag-tag collection of strippers, hustlers and philosophers have come together to celebrate the life of Miss Ruby, an iconic burlesque performer who has requested a funeral before she dies. The party rages through the night as old friends resurface to pay their respects. The production will feature scenic design by Scott Pask, with costume design by David Zinn, lighting design by Japhy Weideman and original music and sound design by Fitz Patton. Airline Highway received its world premiere at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre in December 2014. Related Showscenter_img Airline Highway Show Closed This production ended its run on June 7, 2015 View Commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Pecan Growers Want Sun

first_imgWhy is it that no matter what type of weather farmers get, it always seems the oppositeof what they need at the time? “Our crop looks strong right now, but we need a lot of sunshine for the nuts tofill out,” said Tom Crocker, a pecan horticulturist with the University of GeorgiaExtension Service.”We sure don’t want a hurricane clouding over south Georgia,” he said as theseason for tropical storms entered its peak. “That would prevent the nut growth weneed for a good crop.”Crocker pointed out the problem that would cause for pecan growers while recognizingpeanut and cotton farmers’ great need for the rain a tropical system might provide.This year’s pecan crop started a long time ago — last fall, actually. After farmersharvested the 1995 crop, the trees set the buds that formed this year’s nuts. The weatherlast October and November were nearly perfect, Crocker said, for a good crop this year.The latest estimates place the Georgia crop at 115 million pounds. That’s about 42percent of the U.S. crop.Georgia pecans are famous around the world. But most pecan lovers can’t name a singlevariety. Pecans just aren’t marketed that way. “We just sell them as ‘pecans,'”Crocker said.Through the spring, most pecan orchards got enough rain to produce nuts from those budsset last fall. “Some areas got more than enough rain,” he said, “and nutsare splitting open.The rain can create another problem for pecan farmers. “The water helped the treesproduce large nuts,” he said. “But now we need sunshine and more water for thetrees to fill those nuts.”When rain becomes scarce in pecan orchards, most growers can create their own.Irrigation systems water more than 60 percent of the Georgia crop. That allows farmers towater when the crop needs it most.But sunshine is a little harder to create.”We’relooking for bright, drier conditions now, when many other farmers want rain,” Crockersaid. “It’sa difficult situation for farmers with pecans and other crops. They have to hope for rainor sun on specific acres.”last_img read more

Read More →

On the Blogs: Michigan Study Sees Potential for Grid Defection Nationally

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Andy Balaskovitz for Midwest Energy News:Michigan lawmakers’ attempts to redesign the state’s solar net metering program may drive more ratepayers to leave the grid entirely, particularly in the Upper Peninsula where electric rates are already high, say researchers from Michigan Technological University.The declining price of solar and the area’s relatively high electric rates mean roughly 65 percent of single-family owner-occupied households in the U.P. could meet grid parity – when the cost of generating your own electricity is less than or equal to buying it from the grid – and afford the systems by 2020, according to the research.Up to 92 percent of seasonal households and about 75 percent of year-round households in the U.P. “are projected to meet electricity demands with lower costs,” the report adds.Joshua Pearce, Michigan Tech professor of materials science and engineering, said the modeling is a continuation of research on the feasibility of self-generation systems in the U.P., but was also done in the context of “potential law changes that would essentially destroy net metering and encourage people to leave the grid.”Pearce, who has a solar installation at his home and would consider leaving the grid if net metering was eliminated here, said utilities should be concerned about the potential for grid defection across the country.“If net metering were to go away or utility rates become punitive, the option is to stay on the grid or leave,” Pearce said. “It makes far better sense for utilities in the long term to encourage customers to (net meter) and partake in it. You need to allow new technologies on the grid and that’s much better than being antagonistic toward customers. You never will win that one.”But just because someone can afford to go off the grid doesn’t mean that they will.“Beyond high initial costs and perceived lack of financing options, common social barriers include lack of institutional support and inert social norms, poor consumer knowledge, low customer confidence, inadequate workforce skills, concerns about aesthetics of renewable systems and the uncertainty, risk and liability of grid defection,” the report says.While grid-defection research has focused on states like California, Hawaii and New York, Pearce said the Michigan Tech team wanted to find the potential in a much different region like the U.P.“Because of its low solar potential and low-income population, the UP case represents a relatively difficult market for off-grid solar-hybrid systems,” the report says. “If it is economically feasible to defect from the grid here, then it might be even more likely elsewhere.”Dan Dasho, president and CEO of Cloverland Electric Cooperative, which services the eastern U.P., said with increasing numbers of ratepayers who move to generate their own electricity, “There will be an issue regarding selling back more energy than you use and you become a power producer. I think the state should go to a place where people do not subsidize you if you put in solar or wind, and by other people who may not have the opportunity or are well off enough to do something like that.”With the goal of avoiding this alleged cross-subsidization, Pearce said more utilities are pushing monthly user fees to “level out” and bring order to the revenue coming in.“That’s absurd,” Pearce said. “Consider going to McDonald’s: To have the right to eat McDonald’s you’d have to pay $100 a month and instead of a dollar menu, everything is 25 cents. They have found a way to charge customers on a per-unit basis, and electricity can also be sold that way. It used to be, but it’s continuing to go the opposite way.“You can force customers to do that until they have an option,” Pearce said, referring to punitive measures driving grid defection. “Now people have an option.”Full item: Net metering changes could drive people off grid, Michigan researchers say On the Blogs: Michigan Study Sees Potential for Grid Defection Nationallylast_img read more

Read More →

Mountain Mama: Walk to Stop the Atlantic Coast Pipeline

first_imgRural African-American communities, indigenous people, church groups, and activists are walking across North Carolina to oppose the DAPL of the southeast, the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline.The walk began last Friday at the Virginia-North Carolina boarder. Along the way they’ll provide information about the pipeline at schools, churches, and community centers. After walking the 205-mile proposed route of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline in North Carolina, the walk will end in Hamlet, North Carolina.The proposed pipeline puts our rivers, mountains, national forests, wetlands, and ground water at risk. The $5.5 billion projects also affects West Virginia and Virginia. In the multi-state area, the route crosses 1,989 waterbodies, 71 miles of vulnerable karst terrain, affects 248 acres of wetlands, crosses 15.9 miles of the George Washington National Forest in Virginia, and crosses 5.1 miles of the Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia.The pipeline will directly affect the traditional lands of several native tribes including the Monacan, Chickahominy, Eastern Chickahominy, Nansemond, Nottoway, Occaneechi, Haliwa-Saponi, Meherrin, Tuscarora, Coharie, and Lumbee.An independent study shows that the existing gas supply provides enough gas to meet consumer demand through 2030, providing ample time to develop renewable energy sources. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline is one of six major pipelines proposed for West Virginia and Virginia. Experts warn of the risk to our environment caused by overbuilding pipeline infrastructure.Greg Buppert, Senior Attorney at Southern Environmental Law Center said, “Dominion’s Atlantic Coast pipeline will not only irreparably alter our natural terrain but it is also unnecessary. The current route carves through the mountains in an area the U.S. Forest Service calls, ‘the wildland core of the central Appalachians’, for a pipeline that will lock generations of Virginians into dependence on natural gas.”The pipeline also jeopardizes many communities along the proposed route.  Nancy Sorrells of the Augusta County Alliance said, “Every foot of this route has a victim: a family that would be displaced, a farmer who would be impacted, schoolchildren whose safety is compromised, and residents whose drinking water is a risk. And for what? Not for energy independence or to turn on the lights, but rather for the profit of a private corporation.”Proponents of the project promise jobs for economically disenfranchised communities. Many claim that the promise of jobs is often empty, with utilities companies bringing in hired crews from elsewhere for the higher paid jobs, only hiring locals for low-paying and temporary jobs. Ericka Faircloth, a Lumbee Indian member of the grassroots Eco Roberson said, “Folks who live in Robeson County, one of the poorest and most diverse counties in North Carolina, are especially vulnerable to the empty promise of jobs. Residents of low wealth will be most severely impacted by higher utility rates to pay for the pipeline, and by lowered value for their land.”The organizers of the Walk to Protect Our People and The Places Where We Live consider this an early step in organizing North Carolina, laying the groundwork for a grass-roots resistance supported by national groups. If you’d like to walk part of the route or support the walkers, you can find more information here. The public-comment period on the draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline will end on April 6, 2017. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Statement is available here.last_img read more

Read More →

Colombian Army Accuses FARC of Deadly Attack

first_imgBy Dialogo December 11, 2012 A man died and three women were injured on December 8, in an attack that the Colombian Army attributes to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), accusing them of not respecting the truce they announced. “The FARC threw two ‘tatucos’ (improvised grenades) in the rural area of Caloto. One of them did not explode, but the second one hit a house,” General Jorge Humberto Jerez, commander of Task Force Apolo, operating in the north of the Cauca department, explained to AFP via phone. The explosive device thrown against a house in Caloto, Cauca, “caused a 32-year old man to die, and injured two women and a girl,” explained Jerez. The FARC, currently in peace talks with the Colombian government in Havana, Cuba, announced a two-month unilateral truce on November 19. In Havana, the spokesman for the FARC assured that the unilateral ceasefire has been maintained, except for a few “unimportant minor incidents,” but the Colombian Army claims it hasn’t been respected on several occasions. “The FARC continue to attack the civilian population,” confirmed Jerez, who also accused them of the death of an Army non-commissioned officer. Colombian General Jerez claims that no combat between the military and the guerrillas was registered before the improvised explosive attack against the household in Caloto, a town located in an area historically influenced by the FARC. On its part, the government of Juan Manuel Santos mantains that the military offensives will continue against the guerrillas, until a peace agreement is reached. Last weekend, the Colombian Army attacked three FARC camps in the municipality of Ricaurte, Nariño, where at least six rebels died. In Havana, the government and the guerrillas resumed the peace talks on December 5 after a five day recess, looking for a solution to the Colombian conflict, the oldest in Latin America, that has caused 600,000 deaths, 15,000 missing and four million displaced people, according to official numbers.last_img read more

Read More →

NGO Denounces Venezuelan Supreme Court Before Inter-American Commission On Human Rights

first_imgBy Voice of America / Edited by Diálogo Staff October 25, 2019 On September 25, Laura Louza, director of the Venezuelan nongovernmental organization (NGO) Acceso a la Justicia (Access to Justice), denounced the Venezuelan Supreme Court to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) for ordering at least 105 sentences against lawmakers of the National Assembly for non-existent crimes.Louza said that the sentences “lacked real crimes being committed and evidence. Rulings lack proper proceedings.” She added that some legal grounds are repeated in all cases without a valid legal basis.The NGO reported that all lawmakers have been victims of some kind of persecution, but highlighted sentences lacking legal grounds as the most serious.It also reported what it considers to be the eradication of political parties through sentences. According to Louza, only 18 political parties remain — 12 pro-government and six opposition parties – compared to the 67 that existed in 2015.Ambassador Gustavo Tarre, representing the government of Interim President Juan Guaidó, supported the NGO report, urging IACHR to speed up proceedings against human rights abusers in Venezuela so that they can be prosecuted at the International Criminal Court.“Human rights violations do not alter the duties of the Venezuelan State to prevent and comprehensively redress the violations committed,” said Tarre, who added that the interim government will continue to demand the “respect and guarantee” of human rights, even from the regime and all public officials.He added that once the usurpation comes to an end, Venezuelan legislation and international treaties will be duly respected and enforced, and Venezuela will return to the Inter-American Human Rights System and continue to work to strengthen the IACHR.During the hearing, IACHR Commissioner Flavia Piovesan pointed out to the audience that there is an “extremely serious” situation, and stressed that the “driving force in the organization is an organized civil society.”She added that the commission is committed to the situation in Venezuela: “We are committed to using all the mechanisms and tools that we have, providing cautionary measures, and issuing reports and declarations containing categorized sentences,” among others. In addition to Louza, two other representatives from civil society also attended the hearing and called for strengthening protection, reiterating the request for cautionary measures, and for working jointly with institutions such as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.last_img read more

Read More →