8th Ranked Snow Volleyball Preps for Tourney

first_img Written by Mike Traina FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailEPHRAIM, Utah (Oct. 27, 2018) — Following a tough five-set road loss to Utah State Eastern on Friday, the sixth-ranked Snow College volleyball team rebounded with a decisive, 3-0, victory at Colorado Northwestern on Saturday.Over the weekend, sophomore Sai Collins led the Badgers wth 27 kills over eight sets, averaging 3.4 kills per set. In the Badgers’ 3-0 win over CNCC, Collins was 13-for-26 with just four errors to hit .346. Defensively, Savannah Tanner had a match-high 26 digs against Utah State Eastern, and followed that up with 12 more digs against the Spartans. She had only one reception error over two matches (8 sets).With the win at CNCC, the Badgers finished the regular season with an overall record of 24-4 (.857) and 7-3 in league play. Snow will now prepare to travel to Twin Falls, Idaho, where they will take on Utah State Eastern at the Region XVIII Tournament on Friday, Nov. 2 at 4 p.m.. Due to seeding and a five-team bracket, the winner will advance to the championship game, which will be held on Saturday, Nov. 3 at 1 p.m.center_img October 29, 2018 /Sports News – Local 8th Ranked Snow Volleyball Preps for Tourneylast_img read more

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TKMS gets contract for six German-Norwegian Type 212 CD subs

first_imgAfter years of negotiations, Norway and Germany have reached an agreement with ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) for the acquisition of new Type 212 CD (common design) submarines, the Norwegian Ministry of Defense said on 23 March. With the progress now achieved in the Norwegian-German strategic cooperation project U212CD, TKMS will be able to consolidate its partnership with Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KDA), which has already existed since 2017, and expand value-adding industrial partnerships in both Norway and Germany. As informed by the defense ministry, the total cost of the project is estimated at NOK 45 billion ($5.2 billion). Back in 2017, the two governments selected TKMS preferred bidder for the project. Within the scope of the contractually agreed industrial cooperation obligations, TKMS also plans to collaborate specifically with small and medium-sized Norwegian companies. Related Article Type 212 CD submarines View post tag: Type 212 CD Norway will receive four submarines and Germany two. Industry collaboration The first submarine is scheduled to be delivered to the Royal Norwegian Navy in 2029, while the first two boats for the German Navy are planned to be handed over in 2031 and 2034. Posted: over 4 years ago Categories: View post tag: Norwegian Navy Posted: over 4 years ago Also on 23 March 2021, the agreement has been reached on joint acquisition of missiles as well as the development of a future missile. “This is a new important milestone in the collaboration between the two nations with an industrial perspective. Together we will make next generation world class submarines and combat systems, and the agreement will lead to new innovations and value creation, not only for KDA but also for our subcontractors and other medium-sized Norwegian companies in the future,” Eirik Lie, President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, said. The partnership involving both countries’ industries is based on a German-Norwegian common purchase and lifetime management of identical, new submarines. It will include a purchase of identical submarines and cooperation on training, exercises, spare parts, maintenance and lifetime management of the new submarines. The submarines are based on the 212-design already in service in Germany and Italy. German TKMS will build Norway’s submarines The deal is yet to be approved by the German Parliament and is expected to be signed this summer. With the ORCCA product family, kta naval systems is setting new standards for submarine combat systems. The company was founded in October 2017 as a joint venture between thyssenkrupp Marine Systems, its business unit for Naval Electronic Systems (Atlas Elektronik) and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace. kta naval systems develops, produces and maintains as an exclusive supplier all combat systems for submarines from thyssenkrupp Marine Systems. Authorities View post tag: ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems The new Type 212 CD submarines will share the low signatures of the Type 212 boats in service with the navies of Germany and Italy but will have extended range, speed and endurance to allow worldwide operations, according to TKMS. Germany already operates six Type 212 submarines (U-Boot Klasse 212A). The units include U-31, U-32, U-33, U-34, U-35 and U-36. The diesel-electric subs were developed by HDW for the German and Italian navies. View post tag: TKMS “The contract, which has yet to be signed, contains tough conditions for us. Nevertheless, for now we are happy to take this big step towards signing the contract and thank our customers for the trust they are placing in us.” Norway is acquiring four air-independent submarines to replace the existing six Ula-class submarines that were commissioned between 1989-1992. The submarines were designed to last for 30 years and will reach the end of their life in the mid-2020s. View post tag: Submarines View post tag: German Navy Share this article Photo: German Navy photo of a Type 212 submarine “This order represents the most important project for thyssenkrupp Marine Systems for the next decade and will secure employment, not only in Kiel, for years to come,” Rolf Wirtz, CEO of thyssenkrupp Marine Systems, commented.last_img read more

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Postal Mail Carriers and Volunteers Come Together to Help Feed the Less Fortunate

A diverse group of more than 50 volunteers came together Saturday to help feed Ocean City’s less fortunate this holiday season.The Postal Mail Carriers throughout town collected food donations and brought them to the Ocean City Food Cupboard at St. Peter’s Church. But that is only part of the process. Once the donated food is collected, it must be prepared for distribution, and that is where the volunteers came in.“I had no idea how many people would come out,” Dottie Cianci said. “I simply asked for volunteers and put it in the hands of God.”Cianci, Coordinator of the Food Cupboard was delighted to see an amazing response. Among those taking part were Boy Scout Troop 32, the Ocean City High School Key Club, a group headed by Sister Joelle of St. Francis Church, Men in Service from Coastal Christian Church, and a group from Wesley Manor, among others.Cianci said that Wawa and Acme Markets also made donations to help make the day’s efforts a success.The volunteers weighed the food, which totaled more than 7,000 lbs, sorted it and prepared it for distribution according to the size of the families to receive it.Clients come to the Food Cupboard on a monthly basis to receive the donations, Cianci explained.“Our reward is to see how grateful our clients are to receive this food,”she said.To date, the organization has helped to feed nearly 1,500 households for the year, through November. A total of 2,220 individuals have been served during the same time period, she said.In addition to the food, Cianci said there were monetary donations and also gifts of items the clients cannot buy with food stamps, such as soap, toilet paper, shampoo and the like.“It was really a good response,” she said. “We’re grateful for everyone’s efforts and for all the donations.”At the end of the day, Ocean City again proved it is a town with a big heart. read more

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Knotts secures cross-border deal

first_imgAward-winning Northern Ireland bakery Knotts has made inroads south of the border by securing a contract to supply its range of premium, quality “pound” cakes to Donnybrook Fair, a major retailer in Dublin.Andrew Getty, one of the four proprietors of the Newtonards-based bakery, told British Baker that its links with Donnybrook were based on a commitment to provide high-quality cakes. “We have a commitment to freshness and are not interested just in volume and making products with a long shelf-life and Donnybrook Fair shares the same outlook,” he added.The contract to supply a variety of “pound” cakes, including lemon and ginger, Madeira and lime and coconut is the bakery’s first outside Northern Ireland. The cakes are on sale at Donnybrook Fair’s flagship shop, but as it has five more in the Irish capital, Getty said there was potential for a stronger commercial link.In 2005, Knotts Bakery was named among the championship award winners in the UK Great Taste Awards, organised by the Guild of Fine Foods, for its rich fruit cake.last_img read more

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Sheriff’s Office: Intoxicating substances may factor into crash in Cass County

first_imgIndianaLocalMichiganNews Sheriff’s Office: Intoxicating substances may factor into crash in Cass County Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest (95.3 MNC) Two people are recovering after a crash in Cass County that may have been fueled by intoxicating substances.That’s the word from Sheriff’s investigators after the crash, around 5:40 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 27.Deputies were called at that time to the area of M-60 and Pine Lake Street in Howard Township on the report of a vehicle that struck a tree.On scene, sheriff’s deputies found a 20-year-old South Bend man and a 19-year-old Dowagiac resident who suffered injuries from the collision.Both were taken to the hospital for treatment.The circumstances that led to the collision are still under investigation. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest By Jon Zimney – December 27, 2020 0 371 Previous articleThree people hurt during shooting on Chapin Street in South BendNext articleIndiana lawmakers may take a break from gambling expansion bills Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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Lotus Returns To Mishawaka After 8 Years, Offers Tycho Cover, “Malabarista” Bust-Out, & 2 Nights Of Bliss

first_imgOver the weekend, jamtronica favorite Lotus headed to the Mishawaka Amphitheatre in Bellvue, Colorado, marking the first time the band had performed the scenic fan-favorite venue since 2010. With fans having camped out as early as Tuesday to secure the scarce, closeby campsites, the pair of stellar, sold-out shows just outside Fort Collins on Friday and Saturday highlighted just how precise the band has been sounding in 2018 and affirmed that the group tends to pull out all the stops during their most intimate Colorado shows.To open the first show on Friday, Lotus offered up “Lucid Awakening”, with bassist Jesse Miller leading the charge in making the song’s bubbly melody more propulsive. Guitarist Mike Rempel offered tasteful accents during the initial jam, and the percussion section of Mike Greenfield and Chuck Morris pushed the frantic beat forward into “Space In Between”, which featured an extended jam and shred-heavy peak. Up next was “Bubonic Tonic”, with the happy-go-lucky theme making way for a frenetic, electro-tinged jam highlighted by a rhythm section breakdown, before returning to “Lucid Awakening”.A bass-heavy rendition of “Blacklight Sunflare” followed before a major highlight of the first set came in the form of an expansive, rumbling take on “Malabarista”, a seldom-performed song that had not been played since 2013 in Aspen and has been played live less than 20 times in total since it was debuted in 2011. “Move Too Fast” followed, marking the evening’s first offering from Lotus’ most recent album, Eat The Light, as well as the first song of the evening containing vocal samples. After some meticulous fretwork from Rempel, the band executed a spacious transition into a thunderous, funk-fueled “Greet The Mind” to close set one.Following the intermission, “Wax” made for an explosive start to the second frame. Luke Miller perfectly supported the jam as it built up steam before landing in a triumphant resolution ahead of a return to the song’s percussive theme. A smooth “Futureworld” followed jam followed before the band segued into “Tip Of The Tongue”, which featured a discordant improvisation section and was highlighted by Rempel’s soaring, sustained guitar solo and a heavier, more confident tone. Next up was “Kesey Seed”, a slowed-down, soothing, and patient rendition of The Strenght Of Weak Ties track featuring a transcendent and soulful jam. “Livingston Storm” came next, with the grinding, galloping jam led by the band’s tight percussion duo.After a spacey and abstract introduction, the band entered into “It’s All Clear To Me Now”. With the bass propelling the song forward in tandem with the intricate drum line, the rhythm section crafted a solid base to allow Rempel to truly unleash. A sultry transition helped the band move into another highlight of the night, a jam based around the Grateful Dead‘s “Franklin’s Tower”. Staying in “Franklin’s Tower” briefly and driving the crowd into a frenzy, the group closed out their second set with “Gilded Age” before returning for an encore of The Brothers Johnson‘s funk classic, “Strawberry Letter 23”.Setlist: Lotus | Mishawaka Amphitheatre | Bellvue, CO | 9/21/2018Set One: Lucid Awakening > Space In Between > Bubonic Tonic > Lucid Awakening, Blacklight Sunflare, Malabarista, Move Too Fast > Greet The MindSet Two: Wax, Futureworld > Tip Of The Tongue, Kesey Seed, Livingston, It’s All Clear To Me Now > Franklin’s Tower Jam > Gilded AgeEncore: Strawberry Letter 23On Saturday night, Lotus kicked things off with an upbeat take on “Shimmer And Out”, with the song quickly hitting a jubilant peak. The characteristic horn sample announced the second song of Saturday’s show, “Bush Pilot”, which featured a percussive, confident guitar solo from Mike Rempel, followed by an easy-going, unfinished take on “Travel”. Next, the band commenced the first set’s closing sandwich, which saw “Age Of Inexperience” house a “5 Petals” improvisation, recalling the improvisational moniker the band previously took during a performance at Denver’s Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom, as well as “Sid” and “Sift”, with the tones across these tunes running the gamut from eerie and spacious to funk-driven with prominent, bounding bass to accelerated, high-energy peaks that easily drove the crowd wild.For the second set, the band surprised fans with an unusually placed opening “Spiritualize”. From there, Lotus offered up their cover of Tycho‘s “Awake”, marking the seventh time the group has played the soothing, laid-back tune since it was debuted at their own Summerdance music festival in 2015. A bouncing rendition of “Nematode” followed, with the cascading guitar eventually making way for an urgent jam that slowly built into “Slow Cookin’”. A massive drum solo built up the crowd, with the break in the almost trance-like jam prior giving Lotus the opportunity to slow down and gracefully transition into the soulful theme of “In The Bliss”. Savoring the sultry, mellow “In The Bliss” jam, which featured buttery guitar solos throughout, the group eventually landed back in “Nematode” to close out the well-segued segment.A favorite off of Oil On Glass/Feather On Wood came next, with a gorgeous rendition of “Marisol” helping re-center the crowd. Characterized by elevated guitar, trickling and delicate chimes, and a blissful overall feel, the song was a perfect palette cleanser before Lotus closed out their second set with “Bellwether”, a harder-edged, galloping tune off 2008’s Hammerstrike. For the encore, Lotus returned with two fan-favorite slower, melodic tunes, “72 Hours Awake” and a location-appropriate “Colorado”. Both were beautiful renditions, with each similarly evoking a feeling of nostalgia and longing, making for a perfect way to cap the weekend.Setlist: Lotus | Mishawaka Amphitheatre | Bellvue, CO | 9/22/2018Set One: Shimmer And Out, Bush Pilot, Travel > Age Of Inexperience > Sid > Sift > Age Of InexperienceSet Two: Spiritualize, Awake (Tycho cover), Nematode > Slow Cookin’ > In The Bliss > Nematode, Marisol, BellwetherEncore: 72 Hours Awake, ColoradoFor information on Lotus’ upcoming performances, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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A church of words

first_imgCall him a preacher, a soothsayer, a shaman, a poet. It’s the last that Jericho Brown goes by, but it takes all of the above to write lines like “The loneliest people have the earth to love and not one friend their own age” (from “Odd Jobs”).Brown, the Radcliffe Institute’s 2009-10 American Fellow, read Wednesday (April 21) inside the Radcliffe Gymnasium from “The New Testament,” his newest collection of poems.Born to a New Orleans churchgoing family, Brown read with the breathless urgency of a reverend to a hoard of sinners. Before launching into “Another Elegy,” his opening poem, Brown’s command over the audience was palpable. Lapsing into a silence so long it might otherwise be deemed uncomfortable, Brown could’ve predicted the world’s end and no one would’ve budged.Instead he spoke: “Expect death in all our poems. Men die. Death is not a metaphor. It stands for nothing and represents itself. … It enters whether or not your house is dirty. Whether or not your body is clean.”In “The New Testament,” Brown mashes up religion, mixing identity, sexuality, violence, race, death, and more death. “The Bible is a text to go back to,” said Brown, “just like ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’ is a text to go back to.”Both texts are soaked with death; yet as bleak as Brown’s poems can sometimes be, his performance of them — though never shy in intensity — is a catharsis.“I was raised in a church where part of growing up was about getting in front of people and doing what we saw our pastor doing every Sunday,” he recalled. “You have to be able to give over to an audience for them to enjoy it. So I think that’s ingrained in me, no matter what I’m doing.”In “Another Elegy,” a different poem with the same title, Brown read: “Every night, / I take a pill. Miss one, and I’m gone. / Miss two, and we’re through. Hotels / Bore me, unless I get a mountain view, / A room in which my cell won’t work, / And there’s nothing to do but see / The sun go down into the ground / That cradles us as any coffin can.”“I think of every poem as its own character, so I do my best to embody that character,” said Brown, who won the prestigious Whiting Award while at Radcliffe. The coveted honor, which carries a $50,000 prize, is given to writers in the early stages of their careers who show extraordinary talent and promise. Brown is author of the book “Please” (New Issues, 2008), and teaches at the University of San Diego.In “To Be Seen,” Brown read: “You will forgive me if I carry the tone of a preacher, / Surely, you understand, a man in the midst of dying / Must have a point, which is not to say that I am dying / Exactly.”Last year, Brown had a life-changing revelation: “I became very afraid that I was going to die. For the first time in my life, I was thinking, ‘Oh, I might die?’ It had never crossed my mind before. It’s that feeling you have when you almost hit a car, that shaking inside, and I was having that feeling all day, every day, that shaking inside.”Brown handled those thoughts by writing. “I felt like I could deal with that feeling if I wrote about that feeling,” he said.“To Be Seen” takes its title from a doctor’s appointment (“the doctor will see you now”), and in the poem Brown confronts disease, mortality, the doctor he does not trust:My doctor, for instance, insists on the metaphor of war;It’s always the virus that attacks and the cells that fight orDie fighting.  I even remember him saying the word siegeWhen another rash returned.  Here I am dyingWhile he makes a battle of my body — anything to be seenWhen all he really means is to grab me by the chinAnd, like God the Father, say through clenched teeth,Look at me when I’m talking to you.  Your healing isNot in my hands, though I touch as if to make you whole.Noting the lack of joy in his poems, Brown called himself an elegiac poet, but admitted he is really a happy person. “Maybe the joy hasn’t gotten into my writing just yet,” he said. “But it will.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students reflect on supernatural occurrences

first_imgThough the demands of college can be daunting, Saint Mary’s students stay in good spirits as several supernatural occurrences in residence halls prove life on The Avenue is far from a dead end.When her bed began to shake in the middle of the night, senior — then sophomore — Fiona Van Antwerp thought her roommate was playing a prank on her, as the pair had just moved into a double on the fourth floor of Le Mans Hall.Chris Collins “It felt like there was somebody under my bed … pushing up underneath my mattress,” she said. “I thought, ‘Wow, you’re really good. You’re getting the bed to shake while being across the room.’”When the same instance happened a few nights later, though, Van Antwerp knew she couldn’t blame her roommate — or any human.“But after it happened again, I learned that she wasn’t the one behind it,” she said. “It kept happening periodically. I would just be lying in my bed, and the lights would be off, and my bed would start wobbling.”Not being able to trace the cause of her discomfort frightened her even more than the shaking itself, Van Antwerp said.“It would be very hard for me to get any sleep because I would be so terrified that something was going to come get me,” she said. “I felt helpless.”Van Antwerp said her suspicion that some supernatural presence resided in her room was intensified when the wooden floor began making noises.“There was a spot on the floor that would creak really bad,” she said. “Sometimes in the middle of the night, my roommate would be dead asleep in bed. I’d wake up, and I would hear somebody dancing on those floorboards, creaking them back and forth.”Occurrences such as these may be startling, but Van Antwerp said students should embrace the element of surprise, for no malicious intent is involved.“I guess [the ghosts] are students that don’t want to leave, or they’re Sisters that are trying to make sure that Saint Mary’s girls are behaving,” she said.Senior Kathleen Melei said her quad in Holy Cross Hall sophomore year also experienced the presence of an uninvited visitor. “My first night there, I felt tugging on my sheets,” Melei said. “Then, in October, I was falling asleep — kind of sitting there and relaxing before bed — and I heard my roommate Emily come in and get ready for bed.”The sound of shuffling around didn’t subside, though, and Melei said she couldn’t block out the noise.“She was taking forever to get her stuff, and I was like ‘What is she doing?’” she said. “I was facing the wall, so I couldn’t see her. You know how you kind of memorize people’s steps and how they sound? I was like, ‘It doesn’t really sound like her walk. What the heck?’”She decided to open her eyes. “I roll over, and I look at the edge of my bed, and someone is standing there staring at me and smiling,” Melei said. “I was like ‘Emily?’ and it didn’t move. It just stayed there smiling at me.”Melei said she was intrigued and couldn’t avert her gaze.“I realized it wasn’t Emily,” she said. “I was watching it, and the whole room was pitch black, and I [didn’t] have my glasses on. But I could see this thing perfectly, standing on the ground at the edge of my bed.”Recalling the exact details about the figure’s appearance, Melei said, poses a challenge, though one distinguishing characteristic seems unforgettable.“It was a full person,” she said. “I can’t tell if it was a man or a woman. I have no idea. I just remember the smile. It was a huge smile.”Her initial reaction involved more curiosity than fear, she said. “I wasn’t scared when it happened, but afterward, I was freaking out,” Melei said. “From there, I never saw it again after that, but we always had weird experiences in our room.”The format of her quad, she said, consisted of two rooms — one where all the girls slept and one where they could lounge around.“There were so many times where we’d hear our entry door open and someone walking around out there, but no one was there, and our door was locked and everything,” she said. “It happened multiple times.”Melei said she never considered moving out, since she didn’t feel threatened.“I like ghosts,” she said. “I was like, ‘I hope it comes back.’”And maybe it did. One of the girls Melei shared a room with that year, senior Melissa Lustro, now lives in the Annunciata section of Holy Cross Hall — the building’s fourth floor that is typically reserved for seniors.“Sophomore year, we talked to the hall advisor, and she said that seniors have this man who would stand at their edge of the bed and kind of just watch them and do nothing,” Lustro said. “We thought that’s what happened with [Melei].”Lustro said at the beginning of this semester, she was startled awake to an unexpected scene consistent with Melei’s description.“I remember sitting up out of nowhere and just opening my eyes, and I saw a man standing there by my bed,” she said. “It was just kind of like a face.”She fell back asleep right away, and after thinking about it the next day, dismissed the incidence as a bad dream. When history repeated itself, though, Lustro said she could no longer deny reality.“I was probably asleep for an hour, and all of a sudden, my eyes shoot open again, and there’s a face right in front of me,” she said. “I just stared at it and didn’t really do anything. I remember it zooming backwards, and it went against my wall, and it stood there for a quick second and disappeared.”This time, Lustro said her instinctual reaction was to try to determine the figure’s identity.“I just remember turning on my flashlight and trying to look around,” she said. “I couldn’t really say anything. I didn’t scream. I just did the most simple thing.”Though she could not locate the figure, this second appearance confirmed that what she had previously passed off as a dream was, in fact, a supernatural encounter.“It was the same man with a smirk on his face,” she said. “That looks exactly like the man that I saw the other night, so it couldn’t have been a dream the other time.”Lustro said she was more intimidated by the figure’s proximity than by its presence, since it did not inflict any harm on her.“It worried me how close he could actually get, and it felt like he was kind of waking me up at the same time, but he didn’t really do anything,” she said. “I don’t get super bad vibes from it, but it’s still freaky.”Lustro said she does not even need to see to believe in the existence of ghosts, since she constantly feels restless in her room.“I remember the first day moving in this year, I felt kind of weird sleeping,” she said. “I never get a good night’s rest. I always open my eyes and look around and go back to bed. I even try taking naps during the day, and I could be lying down for two hours and not fall asleep.”Her solution, she said, involves increasing the visibility of her natural surroundings to decrease the visibility of any spirits.“Now, I’m sleeping with the lights on because I don’t want to see anything,” she said. “I don’t know what I’d do if I saw it again. Even though people have said before that this man — if it’s the same guy — doesn’t do anything, it still freaks me out.” Even guests in her room have detected that someone else lurks in the space.“They always feel kind of uneasy sleeping, just restless,” she said. “I think he is some kind of spirit. I kind of want to know why he’s there.”Lustro said her firsthand experience with this spirit amplified her belief in the supernatural, she said.“It makes me believe more of the paranormal stuff that goes on because you always hear these stories, and you’re kind of iffy about it,” she said. “I feel like just Saint Mary’s in general has a lot of secrets when it comes to buildings. Especially in Holy Cross, there are a lot of doors that are locked.”Though she has no clue of the man’s identity, Lustro said she continues to reflect on the encounter and strategize for the future. “I don’t want to do anything — even talk to it or tell it to go away because then … that might be inviting it in,” she said. “I don’t want to take any chances.”Melei said students’ engagement with ghosts does not surprise her, since the College has such a rich, historical tradition and has served as home to many individuals.“People have put so much energy into this place, and I think it was a valuable place to so many people,” Melei said. “So I think there are spirits.”Tags: ghosts, halloween, Paranormal Activity, Quiet Hourslast_img read more

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Mayville Boil Water Advisory Lifted

first_imgCredit WRDW TVMAYVILLE — The week-long water boil advisory for Village of Mayville water customers has been ended.Chautauqua County health officials said the advisory has ended except for a few residents on East and West Chautauqua streets.Impacted residents were notified by the county. The order started Monday after service was interrupted due to a water main leak.Water samples collected Tuesday and Wednesday from throughout the village show that the water is safe to drink and use for all other purposes, officials said. The major water main leak was repaired the same day but due to a loss of pressure in the system, a boil water advisory was placed into effect as a precaution.Bottled water was distributed to residents during the advisory.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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UGA Extension in Atlanta

first_imgThere’s a growing hunger in the Atlanta region for locally grown food, greener gardens, healthier lifestyles and information that makes life simpler.The good news is that these are all things that the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has been providing the metro Atlanta area for years. The bad news, according to UGA Cooperative Extension’s new Atlanta-region Extension coordinator Jeff Miller, is that very few people know that the resources they need to live a greener, simpler life are available at their local UGA Extension office.Miller is tasked with organizing the efforts of 18 Agriculture and Natural Resources, 4-H, and Family and Consumer Sciences agents in multiple counties, including their work with other Atlanta-area advocacy groups.UGA Extension agents are already delivering the content that metro residents want and need, Miller said. He just wants to help them reach more people with that information.“We’ve got the programming,” Miller explained. “My job is all about collaboration, cooperation and increasing capacity. Those are my roles.”No stranger to UGA Extension, Miller’s father was Georgia’s first Extension specialist for weeds in the 1960s and 1970s. Miller himself earned a bachelor’s degree in animal and plant science from UGA and a master’s degree in crop science from North Carolina State University before serving as the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Gwinnett County, Georgia, between 1987 and 1991.Collaboration and cooperation are vital in helping UGA Extension reach more of the metro area’s audience. With 18 agents serving five counties, the ratio of agents to residents is about one to 200,000. Those are not great odds for individual outreach, but we have to reach more residents, Miller said.“Half of the population is here in Atlanta,” he said. “Here, we’re looking at Gwinnett, Clayton, Cobb, Fulton and DeKalb counties.There are 3.5 million people in these counties, and there are only 10 million residents in the state.”If Extension isn’t reaching the third of the state population living in Atlanta, it’s not serving all of Georgia, said Greg Price, director of county operations for UGA Extension. There will never be a time when the ratio of county agents to residents in the Atlanta area reaches the one to 5,500 ratio in Washington County, Georgia, or even the one to 20,000 ratio in Elbert County, Georgia. UGA Extension needs a different set of tools in the Atlanta region to fulfill its mission, Price said.“Miller is helping us redefine how we are going to address the needs of the Atlanta region and urban Extension moving forward with the understanding that the ratio of agent to audience there will always be larger than we would like,” Price said.While the county delivery system — in which each county is served by a team of agents tasked with learning about and meeting the needs of that county — is paramount for UGA Extension, there are times when agents could collaborate on programs to streamline their efforts, he said. By packaging five county programs into one organized, regional effort, we can better leverage the large collaborators and media partners needed to make a larger impact.“Cooperation involves looking for shared programming opportunities when counties’ needs overlap,” Miller said. “Collaboration involves working with advocacy groups already active in Atlanta.“Agents are already doing this, but we want to support more of this kind of work. Often you get so busy taking care of your county that the networking and bridge-building it takes to get collaborations off the ground takes a backseat to what you need to do today.”Not in a managerial role, Miller was hired to support agents in making connections. He’s also tasked with increasing capacity by pinpointing populations that are being underserved and finding ways to include them in UGA Extension programming. This includes young urban families who may have never heard of Cooperative Extension, as well as newly arrived Asian and Hispanic families.To that end, Miller is reaching out to community leaders across the five-county area to let them know of services provided by UGA Extension. He shares the feedback from those community leaders with county agents and Extension program development coordinators.“UGA Extension has always worked by fostering partnerships with the communities it serves — whether in downtown Cordele or downtown Decatur,” said Laura Perry Johnson, director of UGA Extension in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Our agents work to serve the changing needs and interests of Georgians throughout the state, and with Jeff in the Atlanta-region coordinator’s position, we will be able to better serve the state’s growing urban and suburban populations.”For more information about Miller’s new role and how UGA Extension is helping to strengthen its presence in the Atlanta area, visit the UGA Extension Metro Atlanta Facebook page.last_img read more

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