‘Kids 4 Peace’ brings Muslims, Jews and Christians to Camp…

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Luke BlountPosted Jul 23, 2012 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 23, 2012 at 7:21 pm I would love to see this article formatted into one of the weekly bulletin inserts/bulletin covers. I feel it would help the wider Episcopal audience to appreciate the church’s leadership in pursuing reconciliation among disparate religious groups. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Children, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest ‘Kids 4 Peace’ brings Muslims, Jews and Christians to Camp Allen Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Ecumenical & Interreligious Comments (1) Don Hill says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Children from the Holy Land and the United States work together to conquer the ropes course at Camp Allen during “Kids 4 Peace” interfaith camp. Photo/Diocese of Texas[Diocese of Texas] Over the past decade, countless conventions, meetings and summits have been held in search of a long-lasting peace between faith communities in Israel and Palestine, but for the children who take part in Kids 4 Peace, the solution seems simple because they experience it every day.Kids 4 Peace is a interfaith program developed through the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and St. George’s College in Jerusalem that brings together Christian, Jewish and Muslim children from the Holy Land and the United States to take part in summer camps. The first camp took place in 2002 at Camp Allen, and 10 years later, Kids 4 Peace returned to the Diocese of Texas to inaugurate an annual gathering for interfaith education.Typically, 12 children, four of each faith, come together from Jerusalem along with 12 from the United States. They live, play, work and worship together for two weeks while exploring their similarities and differences. Currently, Kids 4 Peace has five two-week summer camps across the United States.“Ten years ago we had this dream of a summer camp where children would have the chance to meet each other face-to-face, cross the lines of conflict, learn about each other’s lives and religions and lay the groundwork for a better future,” said the Rev. Josh Thomas, executive director.Looking at the group at Camp Allen in July, it was hard to tell which kids came from which country or religion. They liked the same games, wore the same clothes and spoke at least some English. During dinner one evening, they all sang along to a pop song from the British/Irish band, One Direction, belting out the signature line “You don’t know you’re beautiful” in unison.“We are all friends,” said 12-year-old Eliya, a Jew from Jerusalem. “Jews, Christians, Muslims. That’s how it is supposed to be, so it’s good.”The children spent the week observing the practices of other faiths including Jewish Shabbat prayers, Muslim prayers and an Episcopal Eucharist. After each service, they asked and answered questions to learn more about the three faiths.Building friendships and seeking common ground came easily for the Kids 4 Peace throughout the week. They conquered physical challenges as well as emotional ones. One of the first activities they participated in together was Camp Allen’s challenge course and giant swing. The children had to work together, encourage and help each other to climb obstacles and ride a zip line more than 50 yards.Kids 4 Peace campers engage in discussion with an adult leader. Photo/Diocese of Texas“It’s fun because I’m not thinking, ‘They are not from my religion,’” said Eyal, another 12-year-old Jew from Jerusalem. “I don’t think like that.Crossing cultural barriers is the central theme of the Kids 4 Peace camp, and Thomas sees a uniting principle that all three faiths can rally around.“Kids 4 Peace’s bottom line message is that all the children of Abraham can live together in peace,” Thomas said. “Peace and being a peacemaker is a priority and an imperative of each religious tradition on its own as well as something that is strengthened by our time together.”Throughout the week, the children displayed endless curiosity and love for each other. If one of them upset another, they were quick to forgive and forget. If another needed encouragement, they would gather together to cheer each other on. The ease with which they achieved a common understanding and the joy they expressed at every moment of the day leads one to wonder if these children could teach adults.“Adults could learn that maybe not everyone from a certain place or group is bad,” said 12-year-old Serifat, a Muslim from Houston. “We are just like everybody else.”“A lot of adults are not nice,” Eliya said. “I would just tell them not to behave like that because it’s not nice, and if we keep doing that, the world will never have peace.”“If you are fighting because of different religions, it’s not a good example for anything,” Eyal said. “It’s just not the right thing to do.”The simplicity of their message may seem trite when compared with the complexity of the conflict in Israel and Palestine, but perhaps they are on to something.“I often say the Kids 4 Peace is the closest thing I have experienced to a glimpse at the reign of God,” Thomas said. “The ease at which they come together and form relationships is so natural that it offers a glimpse into human possibility of what we are here on this earth for. It feels as if they have been waiting their whole lives for this chance to be together.”Thomas thinks that peacefulness is the natural state of these children, and if they can harness it at a young age, they can carry it into adulthood with a deeper understanding of what it means to be different, yet so similar. Kids 4 Peace conducts a continuation program in Jerusalem for 13- to 14-year-olds as well as a new leadership program for older teenagers to learn peace building skills as they transition to adulthood.“It is possible to love your enemies,” Thomas said. “It really is possible to cross beyond those things that divide people and learn about one another. We can value each other’s dignity and worth while respecting differences.”Visit the Kids 4 Peace website to learn more about the camps.— Luke Blount is a staff writer and communications specialist for the Diocese of Texas. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img read more

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Cathedral Age interviews presidential candidates on ‘Faith in America’

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Faith & Politics Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Posted Aug 21, 2012 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Washington National Cathedral] Following a weekend during which presidential candidates President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney marked Sunday by attending respective church services, the candidates discuss their views of faith in public life in unprecedented interviews in the midsummer issue of Cathedral Age magazine, the quarterly flagship publication of Washington National Cathedral. These interviews, in which each candidate answers a set of identical questions about his individual faith and the place of religious beliefs in the political process, are the most transparent look yet into the faith of the two candidates.Cathedral Age asked the candidates eight questions including: “How does faith play a role in your life,” and “What does a political leader’s faith tell you about him/her as a person?” as well as how each responds to those who question the sincerity of his beliefs. In their revealing answers, the two candidates discuss their personal beliefs, address those who have questioned their faith, and explain their vision for how faith communities can work together with government for the public good.In answering these questions and others, both candidates reaffirmed their beliefs and spoke about how religion should not be the singular measure of a candidate.“First and foremost, my Christian faith gives me a perspective and security that I don’t think I would have otherwise: That I am loved. That, at the end of the day, God is in control,” said President Obama. “Faith can express itself in people in many ways, and I think it is important that we not make faith alone a barometer of a person’s worth, value, or character.”Governor Romney said, “I am often asked about my faith and my beliefs about Jesus Christ. I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and the Savior of mankind.”Romney also said, “A political leader’s faith can tell us a great deal or nothing…Perhaps the most important question to ask a person of faith who seeks a political office is whether he or she shares these American values: the equality of human kind, the obligation to serve one another, and a steadfast commitment to liberty. They are not unique to any one denomination.”The complete interviews may be downloaded at www.nationalcathedral.org.With its first issue dating back to Easter 1925, Cathedral Age is produced four times a year and seeks to offer its readers an indispensable, thoughtful resource for Americans of all faiths and perspectives. Recent editions of the magazine have included an interview with former First Lady Barbara Bush, a reflection by Pastor Rick Warren, and coverage of the ongoing effort to restore the Cathedral following the damage incurred from the earthquake that hit the East Coast in August 2011.One unifying theme between both candidates’ answers was a dedication to the “other” as an expression of the Christian faith. Governor Romney said that he was inspired by the words in the Gospel of Matthew when Jesus said that those who cared for the poor, hungry, the naked and the “least of these,” cared for Christ.Romney said, “My faith is grounded in the conviction that a consequence of our common humanity is our responsibility to one another—to our fellow Americans foremost, but also to every child of God.”President Obama discussed a similar theme in his response to a question about the role of faith in public life. “We face big challenges in this country, and we’re coming to the point where we will decide if we’re truly in this together or if each individual ought to just fight for what serves them best,” the president said. “Faith tells us that there is something about this world that ties our interest to the welfare of a child who can’t get the health care they need, or a parent who can’t find work after the plant shut down, or a family going hungry.”Both candidates also addressed the sacred principle of religious freedom and the role that faith can play in unifying the nation and in promoting the common good.“Religious liberty is the first freedom in our Bill of Rights,” Governor Romney said. “And whether the cause is justice for the persecuted, compassion for the needy and the sick, or mercy for the child waiting to be born, there is no greater force for good in the nation than Christian conscience in action.”President Obama said, “This country has a rich tradition of seeking to create an environment where people of different beliefs can live together and share common goals. As Americans, I think we understand that—in protecting our ability to advocate for our own positions—we must protect the ability of those who come from different backgrounds and beliefs to do so as well. Faith demands that we see the image of God in one another and respect it.”Washington National Cathedral is called to be the spiritual home for the nation. It aspires to be a catalyst for spiritual harmony in our nation, renewal in the churches, reconciliation among faiths, and compassion in our world. In promoting interfaith understanding, the Cathedral is a leader in convening people of all faiths to examine and respond to important issues. The theme of “faith and the election” for the midsummer issue of its magazine is one example of how the Cathedral lives out its role at the intersection of faith and public life.“Our presidential candidates have been molded by their faith communities as they have been shaped by educational institutions, families, and work experiences. The sources of their convictions and assumptions are proper inquiries in an election year,” said the Rev. Dr. Francis H. Wade, interim dean of the Cathedral. An essay by Wade—“The Search for Understanding: Claiming (and Reclaiming) Faith’s Constructive Force”—introduces the interviews with the candidates in the magazine. “We are not called to common conclusions but to common paths, principles, and hopes. People of faith are bound to a given set of questions, even if the answers will vary.”Washington National Cathedral has been the location of funeral and memorial services for nearly all the 21 presidents of the United States since the Cathedral’s founding. There have been three State Funerals (for Presidents Eisenhower, Reagan, and Ford), one official burial service (President Wilson), and seven memorial services for U.S. presidents. Beginning with President Ronald Reagan’s second inauguration in 1985, presidential inaugural prayer services have also been held at the Cathedral. The exception was President Bill Clinton, who chose Metropolitan AME Church, the historic black church in downtown Washington, for both of his inaugural prayer services. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Cathedral Age interviews presidential candidates on ‘Faith in America’ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

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Called to Common Mission, focusing on mission

first_img Submit an Event Listing By Pat McCaughanPosted Jan 29, 2014 Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ecumenical & Interreligious Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service February 5, 2014 at 9:06 pm I am the priest in charge of a joint Lutheran/Episcopal church in Las Vegas, New Mexico – and am loving the tensions and the celebrations that are part of honoring both traditions in our liturgies, our spirituality and witness, in our polity and the greatly expanded list of pot luck specialties that would not otherwise be available. We are blessed by our two bishops, Michael Vono of the Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande and Jim Gonia of the Rocky Mountain Synod of the ELCA.We Episcopalians are humbled, of course, by the knowledge that at least one of the Wise Men was a Lutheran (some of the Dead Sea Scrolls hint that the original meaning of “myrrh” was “meatball casserole.) Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VAcenter_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopalian Dr. Elizabeth Drescher and Lutheran Pastor Keith Anderson have been collaborating on issues of church communication and social media. Photo: Facebook/Upper Dublin Lutheran Church[Episcopal News Service] Call them Lutheran-Episcopal digital collaborators.Episcopalian Dr. Elizabeth Drescher and Lutheran Pastor Keith Anderson co-authored “Click 2 Save: The Digital Ministry Bible” and closed out the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity with a Jan. 25 “CommFest 2014” workshop about church communication and social media at Trinity Lutheran Church in Worcester, Massachusetts.Theirs is among a growing number of creative ministries and mission-minded expressions of the 12-year-old Called to Common Mission unifying agreement between the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and the Episcopal Church.Other evidences of deepening collaborative relationships include: the November joint statement from the presiding bishops of both churches, the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori and her Lutheran counterpart, Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton, regarding the Dec. 1 observance of World AIDS Day. There is also the recently announced agreement with their Canadian counterparts to coordinate responses to natural disasters and other events that may transcend their borders.Additionally, the Episcopal Church and the ELCA share an Office of Government Relations staff position of legislative representative for international issues, and there is a joint ministry and training among the federal chaplaincies.The Rev. Jon Perez, a member of the Lutheran Episcopal Coordinating Committee (LECC), estimated that about 50 “formal and informal” joint Lutheran and Episcopal ministries approved by governing bodies of both churches exist around the country, including his own congregation, Epiphany Lutheran and Episcopal Church, in Marina, California.“We’ve passed the ten year mark with Call to Common Mission (CCM) and in this next ten years we want to focus on how to make this more intentionally missional work … and to see how we both can better use this relationship to reach the unchurched and those who have left the church and do it in a bold way,” he said.Despite concerns about CCM, “we didn’t lose our identity,” Perez added. “Twelve years into it, the ELCA is still the ELCA and the Episcopal Church is still the Episcopal Church and now it’s time to see how we can function more effectively as a missional tool together.”Iowa Bishop Alan Scarfe, a LECC co-chair, agreed. “The work has changed over time. Initially, it was about monitoring where we were and where we might have differences, like was everybody rightly represented at all the ordinations.“But, we’ve moved on, to a place where we regularly set goals, have a five-year plan,” Scarfe said. “The idea of focusing on mission is to focus on how much there is to do in God’s name and the fact that we can all come together to do this across our denominations, that’s what ecumenism really is.”Digital Collaborators, ‘match.com colleagues’Drescher’s and Anderson’s collaboration happened “in an organic way in the digital world … a match.com colleague relationship” and embodies the ecumenical relationships enjoyed by the ELCA and the Episcopal Church, she said.Elizabeth Drescher“We connected on Facebook. I enjoyed his blog. We stayed in touch” and when Drescher, an author and academic who teaches in the religious studies and pastoral ministries department at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California, was considering a follow-up to her book “Tweet If You ♥ Jesus”, she invited Anderson’s input.They collaborated on “Click 2 Save: the Digital Ministry Bible” but didn’t actually meet until the book was in the final stages, according to Anderson, a pastor at Upper Dublin Lutheran Church near Philadelphia, during a recent telephone interview with ENS. “We did everything by email, Twitter, Google hangouts, Skyping; our weekly writing meetings were on Google plus.”Keith AndersonIt led to joint speaking engagements, like the recent CommFest 2014 where the duo offered a basic message that while the CCM is really important, “a lot of things happen organically on the ground and especially even more so with social media,” said Anderson, 40.“It allows people to connect beyond denominational networks, and share interests, concerns and passions, person to person and that’s certainly what we experienced,” he said. “Through social media, we were able to serendipitously become connected, grow deeper, and make contributions for the life of the church.“Through our story we are helping people to think about how social media can enable people to connect, to contribute to the larger church,” he said. “In some ways we’re just living into what the Call to Common Mission means.”Drescher agreed. “Our collaboration has brought the conversation to both of our denominational communities and that’s allowed us again to model a way of being in relationship,” she said during a recent telephone interview. “It tends to happen that I get invited to Episcopal things and Keith gets invited to Lutheran things and we bring each other along to the extent we can. It’s great to color outside the lines with him.”At CommFest 2014 the pair discussed the spirituality of the “nones” — those who check the ‘none’ box on forms asking for religious affiliation — “but who remain interested in questions of meaning and value and the spirit.”About 70 percent of “nones” come from Christian backgrounds and about 50 percent of those raised in the Episcopal Church will not be Episcopalians as adults (40 percent for Lutherans), Drescher said. Yet, they remain interested in “the very kind of questions that are our stock and trade in churches; we need to be thinking about more creative ways to be in conversation with them,” she said.Ecumenical advocacy, shared strategiesIn issuing a joint statement about World AIDS Day last November, the presiding bishops of both churches called upon Episcopalians and Lutherans to explore ways the common mission agreement might facilitate collaborative advocacy and shared strategies.“Our churches’ full-communion relationship is more than ten years old, and local communities are now collaborating in varied and exciting ways,” according to the statement. “Can shared strategy toward AIDS-free communities be a part of this? Could congregations challenge themselves to see the National Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS – observed annually beginning the first Sunday in March – as an opportunity to begin?”Sarah Dreier, who until December 2013 served as the ELCA and Episcopal Church legislative representative for international issues, said that collaborative role “helps to magnify our voice” on such global issues as combating HIV/AIDS and reforming federal food aid policies “that would help reach many more people … and substantially address the needs of poor and hungry people around the world.”“It was a policy that both the Episcopal Church and the ELCA are deeply committed to,” said Dreier, 31, the daughter of Lutheran pastors, who left her position to pursue a doctorate in global peacemaking and economic justice at the University of Washington in Seattle. “We were able to do a very substantial amount of advocacy work, reaching out to key members of Congress who would have the potential of helping to move this issue from across the aisle.”Alex Baumgarten, director of government relations for the Episcopal Church, said the two churches initiated the joint position in 2011 in part because of “financial stewardship in the area of declining budgets, but even more by a sense that the two churches shared very similar witnesses – with the chief distinctions often being the cultural and geographic perspectives that informed those witnesses – and that each of those two similar witnesses would be strengthened by more intentional collaboration with the other.”Shared resources were another factor, as “the ELCA has global Lutheran partners in some places where the Anglican Communion is not widely represented, and vice versa,” he added. “We have found over the past nearly three years of sharing this work that our witness as churches has been magnified and enriched substantially as a consequence of partnership with the other.”Now, bishops from both denominations are considering shared advocacy on domestic, state and local public policy initiatives. “The gift of sharing one particular missional staff position with the ELCA has allowed The Episcopal Church, I believe, to challenge our thinking in much wider ways about what unity and common mission mean,” Baumgarten said.“While financial scarcity initially led us to consider sharing this work, it has now become apparent that this scarcity was, in fact, an invitation into a place of far greater abundance than was possible when we maintained separate staff positions in this area.”Becoming missional tools: ‘do it in a bold way’Often collaborative partnerships have developed from necessity but have blossomed into new initiatives. One such is the Komo Kulshan Cluster in Washington’s Skagit Valley about 60 miles south of the Canadian border where four Episcopal churches and a Lutheran church exercise a joint ministry.With average Sunday attendances ranging anywhere from a few people in some congregations to as many as 40 in others, the cluster of five churches — Celebration Lutheran and Christ Episcopal in Anacortes, Resurreccion Episcopal and St. Paul’s Episcopal in Mt. Vernon, and St. James Episcopal in Sedro-Woolley — have shared clergy, staff and resources like Godly Play classes and jointly hosted a summer day camp for immigrant children.“We are doing vastly more than any one congregation alone could do,” according to the Rev. Helen McPeak, an Episcopal priest.As a result last year, 110 children received summer tutoring and fall school supplies. On Jan. 30 the churches will jointly take on the state legislature at an Interfaith Advocacy Day, according to the Rev. Heidi Fish, a cluster ELCA pastor.“Each congregation would probably only be able to produce one or two folks to go, but with the energy of the leadership and … highlighting the needs, we’re expecting to bring 15 folks,” she said. “One of the issues being discussed is immigration reform and the Dream Act,” which affects some members of the community.In San Francisco, a nearly two-year collaboration began when First United Lutheran (FUL) recognized “we were property-rich and cash poor” and sold their building, according to the Rev. Susan Strouse. They were looking for a place to rent and St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church had an appealing space and community center.St. Cyprian’s, a historically black congregation, was facing drastically changing demographics “but there was a real openness to be part of the community,” recalled Jarie Bolander, a member. Now, he says, the two congregations are “friends with benefits” and recently–with the support of their local and church-wide governing bodies, hired a full-time mission developer to reach out to the “nones,” the spiritual but not religious in the community.“We envision two congregations who are going to maintain their own identities … but we also expect there will be something else that will grow and emerge and we don’t know what that will be,” Strouse said. “We’re trying to make a space for something new and wonderful to happen and we don’t want to put a definite vision on what that’s going to look like. We want it to come from the ground up.”But, she added: “there’s no template, no guidelines …and even though we’ve got this Call to Common Mission, the two denominations are different—our worship styles, our polity. We knew it was going to be messy but you don’t know what are the minefields until you step into them. But, we’re learning.”The Rev. Canon Stefani Schatz, canon to the ordinary for the Diocese of California, said this first Lutheran-Episcopal collaboration of its kind “is part of a much larger vision that Bishop Marc Andrus has had for the diocese. We understand the whole of our diocese to be an emerging church; we understand all of our diocese to be a mission enterprise zone.”Schatz agreed that “there’s no playbook for it. It’s part of us really looking forward into what I’m calling 21st century church … and we’re trying our hardest to be open within the structures of both churches’ judicatories. It’s been amazing how supportive the Lutherans have been in working with us.”Anders PetersonAs the mission developer for the two congregations as well as the Sierra Pacific ELCA Synod and the Diocese of California, the Rev. Anders Peterson, 30, a newly ordained ELCA pastor, said he hopes to help add a spiritual component to the center’s existing ARC, or arts, resilience and community, identity.“There’s a hope we can engage spirituality in a communal sense; where we can gather together and ask ourselves what it means to be supporting and helping each other in hopes and hurts, vulnerability, passion, our quest to find ways to connect with what is more than ourselves, with what is luring us to be whole and loving and compassionate people. My role is to direct that initiative” and to serve as a kind of community chaplain, he said.While Cyprian’s Center provides daily activities, serving as many as a thousand people weekly, average Sunday attendance at the church ranges about 20, Peterson said. In addition to alternately sharing the facility for worship — First United at 5 p.m. and St. Cyprian’s at 10 a.m. on Sunday — they sometimes host joint services and community events.But he added that “the mission is not to just mush the two together; the mission is to let these congregations flourish in abundance by responding to the needs of their local community. Their local communities are often made up of folks who are unfamiliar with or who have departed from faith life so what does it mean to open up your doors radically and say welcome here, we welcome you just as you are. We welcome you to be in partnership with us and let’s begin with common ground?”He said the congregations are striving to answer the questions of what it means to be “a 21st century spiritual community.“People here [in San Francisco] don’t go to church on Sunday,” he said. “If that’s the case, then how do we be church? How do we be spiritual community? That’s a great challenge.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service.   Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Called to Common Mission, focusing on mission Reaching out to all, including the ‘nones’ Rector Albany, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (1) The Rev. Thomas B. Woodward says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Presiding Bishop and Primate resting after surgery

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Posted Dec 8, 2015 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Presiding Bishop and Primate resting after surgery Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (1) Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA December 9, 2015 at 12:42 am Thank you, God. Hear our continued prayers for our pastor Michael. Tags Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Vicki Gray says: Rector Tampa, FL [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry is resting comfortably following surgery in a Virginia hospital on Tuesday, December 8. According to the Presiding Bishop, his family, and his medical team, the surgery went well, as had been expected. Bishop Curry is alert and awake, and a full recovery continues to be anticipated.Presiding Bishop Curry was taken to the hospital Sunday, December 6 after a visitation to Bruton Parish Church in Colonial Williamsburg, VA.Presiding Bishop Curry and his family are touched by the outpouring of prayers and well wishes. In their thankfulness, they ask for privacy during his recovery.During a Eucharist today at the Chapel of Christ Our Lord, 815 Second Ave., New York City, Bishop Stacy Sauls, Chief Operating Officer and the Presiding Bishop’s chief of staff, offered the following prayer:Precious Lord, take our hands, lead us on, let us stand. Let us stand today that we might better praise you. Let us stand that we might better hear you. Let us stand that we might better see you in the face of our neighbor. Let us stand that we might better embrace those who need you today.  Let us stand that we might better feed those who hunger today. Let us stand that we might better serve the needy today.  Let us stand that we might better clothe the naked today. Let us stand that we might better walk to visit the sick and free the captives and proclaim the good news of salvation to the ends of the earth today and every day. Let us stand today, even though we know you are doing for us better things that we can ask or imagine, to seek your presence with Michael and among us. Strengthen him on this day of his surgery. Guide those who care for him on your behalf in the hospital. And bring us all together again in your way and in your time that we can live lives of gratitude and love from this day onward.  It is in your holy name that we pray. Amen.(Inspired by Songs My Grandma Sang by Michael B. Curry)Bishop Sauls noted that further information will continue to be released by the Presiding Bishop’s office, although further updates are not expected until Friday.Related articles:Presiding Bishop and Primate thanks Episcopalians for their prayersPrayers for our Presiding Bishop and Primate Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

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Philippines church leaders undergo public HIV test to battle stigma

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY HIV/AIDS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Comments (1) Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET June 28, 2016 at 1:00 pm Well done The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Most Rev. Ephraim S Fajutagana, Supreme Bishop of the Philippine Independent Church, undergoes an HIV test as part of the National Council of Churches in the Philippines public campaign to remove the stigma associated with HIV/AIDS.Photo: NCCP[Anglican Communion News Service] Christian leaders in the Philippines have undergone public HIV tests as part of a campaign against the stigmatization of people with HIV/AIDS.The Rev. Rex Reyes Jr, general secretary of the National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP), told a press conference at the World Council of Churches’ Central Council meeting in Trondheim, Norway, June 27 that it was part of an “aggressive educational awareness program.”Reyes, a priest of the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, said that the “strong religious flavour” in the country was a defining issue in the way some people behave towards people living with HIV; and that the public HIV tests was part of a “more practical way” of dealing with the stigma.Church leaders were undergoing HIV tests not because they thought they might have the virus; but “to project the necessity of HIV testing for our young people.”He said: “Our young people are afraid to go for testing because of the discrimination that comes with it, because of the religious taboo that has been hammered home for a long time, the concept of sin and the notion of immorality, and so on.”In addition to promoting HIV testing, the campaign was also designed to challenge young people on the issue of not discrimination and human dignity, Reyes said.The stigma associated with HIV/AIDS led to a large public backlash when a photograph of Reyes undergoing an HIV test was displayed on a huge billboard on the main highway in the country. “I was bashed for that and there was strong reaction from my colleagues to issue a statement,” he said. “But we [decided to] let it pass, because at least people are talking about it.”He said that churches in the Philippines were working together on their approach to HIV/Aids. “It is stronger that way,” he said. “The theological issues are easier to deal with when we talk together.“We recognize churches when they have their own initiative – and that is good. But to drive the point that HIV transcends denominations [and] transcends faith. We have to deal with that in an ecumenical way and I’m very glad that the WCC is leading in this area.”Isabel Apawo Phiri, the associate general secretary of the WCC, said that a statement on HIV/AIDS was being prepared at the on-going meeting of its Central Committee. The statement, which will follow similar statements in 1986, 1996, and 2006, will ask churches to “recommit themselves to the work on HIV,” she said. “What this does is to show that we are united in the area of our HIV/AIDS response. This is not for an individual church to act on its own but for all of us together.” Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Frank Riggio-Preston says: Philippines church leaders undergo public HIV test to battle stigma By Gavin DrakePosted Jun 27, 2016 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Health & Healthcare, Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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Executive Council meets with staff to help ‘light a fire…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Frank Doughty says: October 20, 2016 at 11:54 pm Whatever one chooses to call it, working together to bring back the spirit of Christ as the animating force behind the work we do as a Church and the administration of that Church cannot be a bad thing. Many organizations, including the Church, fall into patterns of work by rote, and it is a good idea, periodically, to bring everyone back on board with the Holy Spirit’s call. PJCABBINESS says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Kenneth Knapp says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 20, 2016 at 8:04 pm I love this, “behind each vow was “deep hope for us to be something closer to what God dreams for us to be.”. What could possibly be a better prayer and a better goal. Dear Lord, hear this prayer. Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (6) Comments are closed. Kathy Klassen says: Pamela Payne says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA October 22, 2016 at 10:32 pm Light a fire in the world sounds good but with Christianity being attacked all over the world including here in America and hundred of thousands being slaughtered and being decapitated the church leaders of all denominations have not come forward as one force. We also have 80 million that have no alliance with a church and 40 million do not believe there is a God out of a population of 325 million. We have a culture out there that wants destroy Christianity and a political force in our own country that wants to morally attack our Christian beliefs and what our country has stood since its beginning. If we don’t wake up. there may not be any Christianity. Being politically correct is not going to do it. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ October 20, 2016 at 9:01 pm I am, admittedly, just the third guy in the third pew…but I cannot make heads nor tails of what this means or how it is relevant to Christianity or the Episcopal Church. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Members of the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council meet with denominational staff members Oct. 20 in the Episcopal Church Center’s Chapel of Christ the Lord in Manhattan to get to know each other better as part of the Church’s effort to have its culture better reflect the loving, liberating and life-giving way of Jesus. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – New Brunswick, New Jersey] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council traveled from here to New York on the first day of its Oct. 20-22 meeting to meet with the denominational staff as part of the Church’s effort to have its culture better reflect the loving, liberating and life-giving way of Jesus.Kicking off the afternoon of conversation, Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry said the work is an effort “to set this church free to light a fire in the world for good and for love.”The entire denominational staff met together Oct. 18-19 to continue the culture-change work it has been doing since late spring. During the final exercise of that gathering each staff member verbally committed to one behavioral change. Curry, describing his reaction to listening to those pledges, said that behind each vow was “deep hope for us to be something closer to what God dreams for us to be.”During council’s opening plenary session Oct. 20 both Curry and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings reminded members about last month’s historic meeting of the church’s House of Bishops and House of Deputies that many members joined to hear about the culture-change work is being aided by Human Synergistics International. The consultants were hired after an investigation of staff complaints made last fall about the work practices of three senior managers at the Church Center in New York. Curry told Episcopal News Service at the time that the decision was broadly based on addressing the need for any church organization in a leadership transition to examine its culture.Jennings linked the work to the questions the Church has recently faced about how to change its structures to better enable the work of mission. “If we don’t pay attention to what we’re learning about the culture of the church, and concentrate on changing it to create a Jesus Movement culture across the church, we’ll never make meaningful structural change,” she said.Changing the Church’s culture “will free up the energy and power of Episcopalians in all orders of ministry to fulfill God’s mission for the Episcopal Church” and the combination of the Church’s culture and energy “will lead us to create a healthy, life-giving, liberating structure that makes the best use of our resources as the people of God,” she said.The Rev. Michael Hunn, left, one of Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s three canons, speaks with Curry Oct. 20 as General Convention Executive Officer the Rev. Michael Barlowe and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, House of Deputies president and vice chair of Executive Council, talk before council members spend the afternoon meeting with denominational staff. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceCurry related the story of the mid-19th and early 20th century evangelist Billy Sunday who, upon reading the Book of Common Prayer, declared “If the Episcopal Church ever wakes up – look out.”“My brothers and sisters, we are awake,” Curry said.Also during the morning plenary before council traveled to New York City, the Episcopal Church’s three Anglican Consultative Council members, Jennings; Rosalie Ballentine, a deputy from the Diocese of the Virgin Islands; and Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas reported on the ACC-16 meeting.Jennings said the Episcopal Church members went to the April gathering in Lusaka, Zambia, “despite conjecture from some quarters that we should not go” because of the Communion’s primates call in January for three years of “consequences” for the Episcopal Church after it acted for sacramental marriage equality. Jennings noted that the ACC declined to endorse or impose the consequences that the primates’ meeting “didn’t have the authority to impose.” She criticized Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby’s subsequent claim that the ACC had, in fact, endorsed the consequences.“I have come, regretfully, to conclude that the polity of the Anglican Communion is in peril, and the Episcopal Church’s support for marriage equality is being used as a smokescreen by a few primates who apparently want to co-opt the authority of the Anglican Consultative Council,” she said.Ballentine, a former council member whose son, Jabriel, now serves on council, said she learned a lot about the Communion during the meeting, which was her first, and she realized that, rather than concentrate on governance in the strict sense, ACC meetings emphasized building relationships to address the world’s issues. The council addressed issues such as discipleship, gender-based violence, climate change, religiously motivated violence and food security that affect all Anglicans and “at no point were we made to feel unwelcome,” she said.Ballentine was seated at the same table as Welby and the experience gave her “a deep empathy for him and the challenges that he faces trying to hold the communion together.” Welby, she thought, understands “our different histories, the complexities of our different contexts and how those impact the church worldwide.”The election of Hong Kong Archbishop Paul Kwong as ACC president was worrisome, she said. Noting that some people said electing a primate to chair the ACC would give all the primates a way to communicate with the ACC, Ballentine said “that is, in my opinion, precisely the danger in electing primates.” The primates, she said, “need to learn how to talk to us not just how to talk to each other.”Douglas, whom Curry praised for his decision to not stand for election as ACC president, said that decision was based on “institutional and cultural” concerns over how his candidacy might effect the ACC, the Episcopal Church and “my own personal vocation” as the bishop of Connecticut.If he had stood and been elected, Douglas knew that “detractors were already preparing statements about the waywardness of the ACC and how it doesn’t reflect the Anglican Communion because a person from the Episcopal Church was elected. That would hurt the ACC,” he said.If he stood and wasn’t elected, the loss could have been claimed as evidence that the Episcopal Church does not listen to the primates. In addition, he said, others helped him discern the impact that the presidency could have on his person life and on his vows to be the bishop of Connecticut.Asked about the Episcopal Church’s $1.2 million triennial contribution to the $3 million annual budget of the Anglican Communion Office, a payment that Jennings said Episcopalians should continue to make with “gladness in our hearts,” Douglas said the payment is about half of what is asked of the Church. Because the asking is based on the GDP of each province’s country or countries and the province’s membership, the Episcopal Church’s contribution is the second largest among the provinces after the Church of England. Douglas noted that current exchange rates make the American dollars go farther in England.* Treasurer Kurt Barnes briefed members on the 2016 portion of the 2016-2018 triennial budget’s performance through August, saying that both income and expenses are in line with forecasts. He also noted that the five-year net earnings for the church’s $370 million in investments, including $110 million that is invested for individual congregations and institutions, was 9 percent annually. That performance keeps the Episcopal Church trusts funds in the top 20 percent among its peers holding trust assets in excess of $50 million. “This strong performance in no way weakens my resolve I mentioned a few months ago to work towards lowering our dividend payout ratio from 5 percent to 4.5 percent in the next few years,” he cautioned. Council will be asked at this meeting to revise the 2017 year of the 2016-2018 triennial budget to reflect changes in income and expenses since General Convention approved the budget in July 2015. Among the changes are higher diocesan income than assumed, delayed rental income for half a floor at the church center and higher than budgeted medical insurance premiums, Barnes said.Web and Social Media Services Manager Barry Merer, near window, speaks to Executive Council members Oct. 20 in an Episcopal Church Center conference room while other staff members listen. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe rest of the meetingOn Oct. 21 council will begin its day with Holy Eucharist at the nearby historic Christ Church in New Brunswick and then spend the rest of the day meeting in its five committees. On Oct. 22 those committees will each report to the full body, proposing resolutions for the full body to consider.The meeting is taking place at the Heldrich Hotel in New Brunswick, New Jersey, about an hour southwest of the Episcopal Church Center in midtown Manhattan.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1). The council is composed of 38 members – 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons, and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. In addition, the vice president of the House of Deputies, secretary, chief operating officer, treasurer and chief financial officer have seat and voice but no vote. – The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. October 20, 2016 at 7:05 pm Bishop Curry’s words brought to mind Charles Wesley’s hymn, “See How Great a Flame Aspires.”See how great a flame aspiresKindled by a spark of grace.Jesus’ love the nations fires,Sets the kingdoms on a blaze:To bring fire on earth He came;Kindled in some hearts it is;O that all might catch the flame,All partake the glorious bliss!When He first the work begun,Small and feeble was His day:Now the word doth swiftly run;Now it wins its widening way:More and more it spread and grows,Ever mighty to prevail;Sin’s strongholds it now o’erthrows,Shakes the trembling gates of hell.Sons of God, your Savior praise,who the door hath opened wide;He hath given the word of grace,Jesus’ word is glorified;Jesus, mighty to redeem,He alone the work hath wrought;Worthy is the work of Him,Him Who spake a world from naught.Saw ye not the cloud arise,Little as a human hand?Now it spreads along the skies,Hangs o’er all the thirsty land.Lo! the promise of a showerDrops already from above;But the Lord will shortly pourAll the spirit of His love. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 20, 2016 Executive Council meets with staff to help ‘light a fire in the world’ Opening session conducted in two states, with a bus ride in between Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Ronald D. Pogue says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC October 20, 2016 at 6:49 pm “Culture change work”. Frightening, Orwellian. Human Synergistics international. Not the Holy Spirit or our Episcopal leadership. This leftist reinterpretation of our faith and practice is a tragedy. Executive Council October 2016 Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Executive Council, last_img read more

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Funerals held as 157 victims of the genocide in Rwanda…

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] The recently discovered bodies of 157 victims of the Rwandan Genocide have been laid to rest in a former Anglican Church, alongside the bodies of 36,700 victims already buried there. On April 15, 1994, more than 25,000 people seeking refuge and sanctuary at the Ruhanga Episcopal Anglican Church were slaughtered. The church is now a memorial for the victims. The scenes at Ruhanga were repeated at other churches across Rwanda. While several of them have been turned into memorials, Ruhanga is the only Anglican church that has become a memorial site.Read the entire article here. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Posted Apr 18, 2018 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Africa, Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Funerals held as 157 victims of the genocide in Rwanda buried in Ruhanga memorial Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

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La Convención General prosigue su ‘tendencia digital’ de funcionar sin…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Los Rdos. Joseph Harmon y John Mennell, diputados de la Diócesis de Newark, muestran sus iPads asignados en préstamo a todos los diputados y obispos para la reunión de la Convención General en Salt Lake City en 2015. Los mismas contienen una “carpeta virtual” que reemplaza electrónicamente a la mayoría de los sistemas de la Convención, hasta entonces impresos. Foto de Nina Nicholson/Diócesis de Newark.[Episcopal News Service] Lo usual era que la Convención General llevara a cabo todas sus funciones legislativas en papel —aproximadamente 1,2 millones de hojas de papel. Ya no más.Por segunda convención consecutiva, cuando cada diputado, diputado suplente y obispo llegue a Austin, Texas, para la 79ª. Convención General, recibirá en préstamo un iPad para usarlo como su “carpeta virtual”. Los iPads que se usarán durante la reunión del 5 al 13 de julio son más nuevos y veloces que los que la Convención General alquiló en 2015.La última vez que los obispos y diputados usaron carpetas físicas para seguir el proceso legislativo de la Convención General fue en 2012 para la 77ª. reunión de la Convención. Foto de Julie Murray/Diócesis de Ohio Sur.Reemplazar cada carpeta física con el sistema digital ahorrara el costo aproximado de 2.400 resmas de papel, las cuales ascienden a unas seis toneladas, más los gastos de copias. Los veteranos de la Convención recuerdan una carpeta que gradualmente se iba llenando con sus copias según progresaba la reunión, con frecuencia hasta el punto de que algunos usaban bolsas con ruedas para transportar sus carpetas. Se reservaba un tiempo en cada cámara para que los obispos y diputados actualizaran sus carpetas. Seguir el progreso de las resoluciones resultaba imposible para las personas que no asistían a la Convención. Ya no más.Además, no sólo las funciones de la carpeta virtual se han mejorado y expandido para brindar un mayor acceso a través de la Iglesia, el sistema ha convertido a la Iglesia Episcopal y a la Convención General en un líder innovador en el terreno de monitorear legislación. Existe también la posibilidad de compartir y facilitar la arquitectura básica del sistema a otros grupos.La carpeta virtual es una aplicación [app] que funciona en los iPads de obispos y diputados, y a la cual se puede tener acceso vía Internet. Los que carecen de un iPad de la Convención General pueden tener acceso a la versión online aquí. Esa última versión reproduce la app que funciona en los iPads y cambia junto con ella en tiempo real.No importa cómo se accede a ella, la edición de 2015 de la Carpeta Virtual le permite a los usuarios  rastrear el desarrollo de las resoluciones de la Convención. Incluye también las agendas diarias de cada cámara, los calendarios para cada día y los diarios (una lista de mensajes intercamerales en que informan a la otra parte de las decisiones que se toman), calendarios e informes de comités . Contiene fichas para verificar las actividades actuales y las enmiendas del pleno en cada cámara.La carpeta virtual para la 79ª. reunión de la Convención General incluye nuevas posibilidades de indagación y medios para seguir la legislación en ambas cámaras. Para pasar de una cámara a otra, o [del inglés] al español, basta hacer clic en el icono que aparece en la parte superior derecha. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSResumiendo, “esto es exactamente lo que los obispos y diputados están viendo en sus iPads”, dijo Twila Ríos —directora de los sistemas de información digital en la oficina de la Convención— a Episcopal News Service. “Se replica en tiempo real, lo cual significa que hay una diferencia de nanosegundos entre lo que sale allí y lo que entra aquí —algo que los seres humanos no pueden registrar”.“Lo más importante es que dentro de las restricciones presupuestarias, que es con lo que todo el mundo en la Iglesia tiene que operar, los nuevos dispositivos responden absolutamente a las interrogantes y las reacciones que hemos recibido después de la última Convención General”, dijo el Rdo. Michael Barlowe, director ejecutivo de la Convención General en una entrevista con ENS.La edición de 2018 de la carpeta incluye estos importantes cambios:Una función expandida de búsqueda de una resolución también le dará a los usuarios más información acerca del estatus de la resolución. Estarán disponibles informes sobres las decisiones respecto a cada resolución, así como información de cuando un comité o una cámara ha de considerar una resolución. Los textos de las resoluciones se actualizarán en la medida en que los comités o las cámaras les hagan cambios.La única manera de saber lo que un comité legislativo estaba haciendo, consistía en encontrar el gran atril en un pasillo de la convención en el cual se anunciaba la agenda diaria de cada comité. Ese puesto seguirá funcionando en Austin, pero ahora esa información podrá buscarse en la carpeta virtual por comité, fecha o/y número de resolución. “Esperamos que funcionará muchísimo mejor que la última vez”, dijo Ríos. “También es dinámica”, añadió, explicando que cuando el presidente de un comité le informa a la Oficina de la Convención General acerca de una reunión que [el comité] quiere programar, uno de los muchos voluntarios ingresa la información en el sistema y la misma aparece inmediatamente en la carpeta virtual. Esos voluntarios también procesarán los cambios de las resoluciones en tiempo real.Las comunicaciones de una cámara a la otra también se publicarán el la carpeta virtual. Además, los documentos basados en textos (diferentes de los PDFs) que se usen durante el debate o los anuncios en forma textual estarán disponibles en la carpeta.La Constitución y los Cánones de la Iglesia también se incluirán en la carpeta. Los obispos y diputados con frecuencia necesitan hacer referencia a esas reglas y “es más fácil tenerlas allí mismo” que en un libro aparte o mediante el acceso a Internet, apuntó Ríos.Versiones actuales de todas las resoluciones sometidas a la consideración de la Convención General se pueden consultar a través de la carpeta virtual. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.La carpeta virtual es la porción de cara al público de un sistema de múltiples faces conocido como el Sistema Online del Proceso Legislativo que la Oficina de la Convención General creó con la ayuda de E-accent , una empresa programadora, según explicó Ríos.“No hay muchos programas legislativos. Existe una serie limitada de proveedores y un número limitado de clientes”, dijo ella, explicando que las entidades gubernamentales con los principales usuarios.“Cuando saltamos a esto para 2015, no había mucho”.La Oficina de la Convención General asumió “un gran riesgo que se vio recompensado” de hacer el cambio a los sistemas digitales en el período previo a la convención de 2015, dijo Barlowe. “Realmente inventamos esto. Nadie ha hecho nada semejante a esto en el mundo legislativo”.E-accent “tomó nuestras ideas y creó esta cosa”, precisó él, llamando a su personal los arquitectos y a los que desarrollaron el programa los ingenieros.La carpeta virtual y todos los otros sistemas que se combinan para hacer que la Convención funcione sin problemas exige muchísimo de ancho de banda y Barlowe dijo que el director de tecnología de la información de la Iglesia Episcopal, Darvin Darling, y su personal han ayudado a su oficina con algunos “medios innovadores [de manera] que podemos hacer más dentro del mismo ancho de banda”.Tanto en Salt Palace in Salt Lake City, donde se reunió la Convención en 2015, como ahora en el Centro de Convenciones de Austin, el personal de apoyo técnico del edificio, dijo él “se fascinó también con lo que estábamos haciendo”.“Es realmente un reconocimiento a la Iglesia Episcopal y a la Oficina de la Convención General que incluso en un lugar como Austin, el cual es tecnológicamente muy avanzado, los apasionados de la computación se han interesado en lo que hacemos”, dijo Barlowe, refiriéndose al evento anual de Austin South by Southwest .La aplicación de la agenda virtual y sus sistemas conectados son también lo que Barlowe describió como un ejercicio en “programación ética”. Sus creadores no explotan a sus trabajadores y la Convención General cumple o incluso sobrepasa las reglas de privacidad estadounidenses y europeas.“Es parte de nuestro trabajo pensar en estas cosas y actuar como uno esperaría que funcione una Iglesia, no sólo con las mínimas normas éticas, sino maximizando la manera en que manipulamos los datos  y la manera en que organizamos las cosas y el modo en que funcionamos digitalmente”, señaló.“La esperanza a largo plazo” es que la Oficina de la Convención General pueda encontrar medios de compartir los sistemas con [las] diócesis y con otras denominaciones, apuntó Barlowe. Por ejemplo, ya ha habido conversaciones con la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América.Si la Iglesia ha sido innovadora en [materia de] programas, también lleva la delantera en el tipo de equipos que la convención necesita. Cuando Ríos estaba buscando alquilar 1.200 tabletas antes de la convención de 2015 para los miembros de ambas cámaras, además del personal administrativo que las necesitaría, descubrió que era un pedido inusual. También resultó inusual  su solicitud de que los iPads tuviesen una “visualización personalizada” con las aplicaciones de la Convención General.“Fuimos una novedad para los proveedores”, dijo ella.En efecto, el proveedor, Meeting Tomorrow, ahora usa la idea de los iPads con “visualización personalizada” como parte de su discurso de venta. Y E-accent, que tendrá personal en la Convención General, usa su trabajo para la Iglesia Episcopal como una exhibición de su negocio.Los sistemas, dijo Ríos, se están refinando y actualizado constantemente. “Es una labor en progreso”, afirmó.El objetivo de esa labor es “tratar de perfeccionar los medios en que podemos proporcionar la información,  hacerla más susceptible de consultar”, explicó. “Existen limitaciones y yo siempre estoy intentando sortear las limitaciones y ayudar a hacer esto mejor, de manera que la gente pueda encontrar la información que necesita”.La aplicación móvil de la Convención General funciona en EventMobi. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Algunas limitaciones son económicas, y algunas son tecnológicas, dijeron ella y Barlowe. Por ejemplo, algunas personas pidieron que obispos y diputados individuales pudieran intercambiarse mensajes desde sus iPads. Añadir la infraestructura para responder a esa solicitud, “estaba más allá de nuestra capacidad económica”,  dijo él.Otra manera digital de estar al tanto de la ConvenciónUna aplicación [app] gratuita de la Convención General está al alcance de cualquiera que use un teléfono inteligente o una tableta que incluya Android 4,4 o IOS 8.0 o posterior. La app contiene horarios de la Convención General, mapas, información de proveedores, órdenes de servicios religiosos diarios y otros materiales útiles. (órdenes completos del oficio eucarístico diario también se incluyen en esta app. como en el iPad, eliminando así la necesidad de imprimir diariamente cientos de folletos  para el culto).Descargue la app. aquí o de la App Store o de Google Play, y luego ingrese el código 79GC cuando se lo pidan. La app también puede usarse en una computadora. Ese enlace se encuentra aquí.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es jefa de redacción y reportera de Episcopal News Service.  Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Tags Featured Events General Convention 2018 Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release La Convención General prosigue su ‘tendencia digital’ de funcionar sin papeles Corregida y aumentada, la carpeta virtual pone la actividad de Austin al alcance de todos Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI General Convention, Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 21, 2018 Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

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Trump administration’s policies loom large in joint hearing on immigration

first_img July 8, 2018 at 11:51 pm I’m getting tired of conservatives making this ridiculous argument. Opposing the cruel immigration policies of this administration is not support for open borders. No major progressive group has proposed that as a solution, so please stop making that disingenuous claim. All we want are more humane immigration policies. Surely there must be more options than cruel immigration policies and open borders. Tags Charles Pierce says: July 7, 2018 at 5:16 pm All well and good, but what is the Churches policy towards helping the 5000 Gold Star Children, (kids missing a parent, separated from a parent), forever because a parent died in service to our Country. Surely these children are of equal importance at least. July 9, 2018 at 8:50 am In truth we do not know, if President Obama administration did or did not separate children from parents. It appears that no records were kept. 48,000 illegal border crossing immigrant were referred for prosecution. The administration either did not enforce the law and allowed the individual to jails with the child or they broke the law. Faith & Politics, Matt Ouellette says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 12, 2018 at 7:39 pm Go do some research into the DOJ and DHS web sites for statistics on such matters. I will not do your research for you. And if you do not research you comments have no validity. July 9, 2018 at 8:55 am What is a felony is to work with out a Social Security Number. How do these folks propose to support themselves if they can not work. The can not receive SNAP, TANF, or Medicaid. Illegal immigrants do not make the economy stronger they weaken it by depressing wages and benefits.BTW because someone else did it sound like me trying to convince my Mother that what I did was not so bad. July 9, 2018 at 12:01 am 1) Illegal border crossing is a misdemeanor, not a felony. Surely ripping children from their parents is an extreme punishment for a misdemeanor, right?2) Many immigrants in the past also came here without following all our laws, and those groups were also hated and scapegoated like today:https://www.bostonirish.com/history/2018/‘you-walked-right-’-‘illegal’-and-‘undocumented’-irish-immigrants-historical3) We aren’t sacrificing any of that for immigration. Immigrant s make our economy stronger, not weaker:https://clas.berkeley.edu/research/immigration-economic-benefits-immigration July 9, 2018 at 3:10 pm If you step back a bit, I am wondering why there is a need for any immigration. Seems we have enough poverty in the US to work on. The US cannot be the haven for the world and this is not 200 years ago. Population growth without limit is a formula for disaster. Just look at the countries that have done just that. Bryon Schmitt says: Matt Ouellette says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET July 8, 2018 at 12:57 pm My sense is that the Church agrees with you. Enforcing our laws on the border is a “crime against humanity”. All church members who believe that they have rights superior to the illegals should understand that they are of no concern to the Church. That train has left the station!! Matt Ouellette says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service July 8, 2018 at 6:34 am C033 in part clearly crosses the line into the ridiculous. The US cannot become the haven for the world. Look at what is happening in Europe. Original cultures are being eroded day by day. C033 advocates for law breakers. Legal immigration is one thing, illegal immigration is a whole other and of which the Episcopal Church seems to approve. EC membership is falling. Do you wonder why? Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Refugees Migration & Resettlement By David PaulsenPosted Jul 7, 2018 boyd conklin says: General Convention 2018, July 8, 2018 at 12:19 pm The so call policy is in fact a law that was passed in 1997 under then President Clinton. Like most laws it should be enforced. Do not like the law have congress change the law.The number of Children separated by the Federal ICE agency so far this year represent the number of children separated from the custodial parent in the 50 states every 3 days. If you are going to preach against a process at least do some research into that process before you speak. Jeff Zelem says: Dr. Kent Blacklidge says: Dr. Kent Blacklidge says: Comments (28) Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Charles Pierce says: Matt Ouellette says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 8, 2018 at 11:53 pm No, this policy was not started under any previous administration. The zero tolerance policy occurred under Trump, not Obama, not Bush, not Clinton:http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2018/jun/19/matt-schlapp/no-donald-trumps-separation-immigrant-families-was/ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ronald Davin says: Rector Martinsville, VA Charles Pierce says: Immigration, John McCraney says: Trump administration’s policies loom large in joint hearing on immigration July 8, 2018 at 4:11 pm “Episcopal Migration Ministries, which is not a separate non-profit organization but is embedded in the Episcopal Church itself, is 99.5% funded by the federal government—that would be you, the taxpayer.” https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2018/07/08/open-borders-left-dominates-episcopal-church-meeting/#more-168177 Charles Pierce says: Rector Bath, NC July 8, 2018 at 10:33 pm Just a few questions on the discussion of illegal aliens:1. What part of the word “illegal” do you not understand?2. What makes these illegal aliens so good that they do not have to follow the same rules that my grandparents followed immigrating from Hungary and Italy?3. Why should we sacrifice our economy, jobs and culture for illegals?Before you automatically call me a Nazi, a xenophobe or a hater, answer the questions. I live in south Texas and I see first hand the laws of supply and demand weakening the American working population and I am watching the annual increase in taxes to pay for hospital and school districts and municipal services. Perhaps the Episcopal Church should be asking what to do about the declining Episcopal membership before advocating for more illegal aliens. Matt Ouellette says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Matt Ouellette says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 cynthia seddon says: Charles Pierce says: July 12, 2018 at 7:41 pm The illegal workers are cheaper because the employer does not have pay social security taxes, workman’s comp or unemployment insurance. That is why people want them. Rector Washington, DC David Horwath says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Nancy Frausto, a “Dreamer” and deputy from the Diocese of Los Angeles, testifies July 7 at the joint hearing on immigration resolutions. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] Few issues were as primed for spirited debate heading into the 79th General Convention as immigration. The Episcopal Church’s triennial gathering is being held in the capital of this border state amid a continuing uproar over a Trump administration policy of “zero tolerance” toward immigrants coming into the country, a policy that involved until recently the separation of children from their parents in detention.General Convention is considering nine resolutions relating to migration and immigration, and all nine were on the agenda July 7 at a joint hearing of two legislative committees at the JW Marriott hotel, just west of the convention center.“We need a statement that says these families matter to this church,” the Rev. José Rodríguez-Sanjuro, an alternate from the Diocese of Central Florida, said.About two dozen people testified, including Central American bishops, border state priests, Episcopalians active in refugee resettlement and at least one “Dreamer,” the Rev. Nancy Frausto, who like other Dreamers was brought to the United States illegally when she was a child. She now is a priest in the Diocese of Los Angeles.“The 800,000 Dreamers need to have the Episcopal Church stand behind them, and not just them but all immigrants,” Frausto said, speaking in favor of Resolution C033, which puts the church on record as respecting the dignity of immigrants and outlines how public policy should reflect that belief.“I’m going to keep it simple: This saves lives,” said Frausto, who also was one of the three panelists who discussed racial reconciliation July 6 at the first of three TEConversations, scheduled as joint sessions of General Convention.The two social justice committees, one focused on United States policy and the other on international policy, held the hearing to take input on resolutions covering a range of topics, including providing sanctuary to immigrants facing deportation, condemning the separation of migrant families, supporting Haitians who are poised to face deportation, and calling for permanent legal status to Deferred Action for Child Arrivals recipients through federal legislation known as the DREAM Act.General Convention has spoken out on immigrations issues through resolutions dating back at least as far as the 1980s. Among them is a resolution from 2012 urging passage of the DREAM Act. This year, Resolution C002 urges passage of a “clean” DREAM Act, a reference to recent political developments that have bogged down progress on the legislation since President Donald Trump ended an executive branch policy of protection DACA recipients.Resolutions passed by General Convention can be used for advocacy work by the Office of Government Relations, which is based in Washington, D.C., and conducts nonpartisan advocacy through direct appeals to congressional offices and by mobilizing the Episcopal Public Policy Network.Of the nine resolutions on immigration before General Convention, the international policy committee is reviewing just one, D009, but that one is substantial. Titled, “Christian Principles for Responding to Human Migration,” it lays out some of the scriptural and theological basis for the church’s advocacy on such issues, as well as the real-world application of those beliefs.The Rev. Paul Moore, an Episcopal priest from Silver City, New Mexico, and chair of Rio Grande Borderland Ministries, testified in favor of D009, speaking in English and then in Spanish, and he cited several Bible passages underpinning the church’s outreach toward immigrants.“Welcome strangers, lest we not miss entertaining angels,” he said, referencing a passage from Hebrews.Angela Smith testified about her work with Saint Francis Migration Ministries in Kansas, an affiliate of Episcopal Migration Ministries, one of the nine agencies which contract with the U.S. State Department to resettle refugees in this country. The number of resettlements has plummeted under Trump, which Smith argued is affecting the country’s standing in the world.“This is not who we are. It is not who we want to be,” Smith said. “Refugees enrich our communities throughout the United States. They bring joy, and they make us better.”More than 100 attended the joint hearing July 7 on immigration resolutions at the JW Marriott hotel in Austin, Texas, during the 79th General Convention. David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAnd the Rev. Chris Easthill, a deputy with the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, emphasized that the issues surrounding migration are not exclusive to the United States, and the church can help stem the tide of fear and hate.“Migration is the big political divide across the globe,” Easthill said. “We need a robust Christian response.”The hearing came as the bishops and deputies attending General Convention are planning a visible response of their own, with a scheduled trip July 8 to a federal immigration detention facility a little more than a half hour from Austin. A prayer service is planned for about noon outside the T. Don Hutto Residential Center, and the Sunday legislative schedule was adjusted to accommodate those who wished to attend.The prayer service was arranged in response to the Trump administration’s policy toward immigrant families crossing the border illegally with children, a policy that is referenced directly in Resolution A178 titled, “Halt the Intensification and Implementation of Immigration Policies and Practices that are Harmful to Migrant Women, Parents and Children.”The policy also was cited July 7 during testimony at the joint hearing on immigration.Bishop Juan David Alvarado of the Anglican-Episcopal Church in El Salvador testified in Spanish with an English interpreter to tell the committees the natural and human-made disasters the country’s people have suffered through, from earthquakes to floods to civil war. Salvadoran immigrants seeking to enter the United States are driven by thoughts of safety, family and opportunity, he said.“The policy of zero tolerance in this country affect greatly the region of Central America,” Alvarado said in supporting Resolution C033.Several people called for language in the resolutions that strengthened the call to action or provided more specifics about the urgency of these issues. Others said it was important simply for the church to take a stand.“We need a comprehensive statement. We need this statement,” said the Rev. José Rodríguez-Sanjuro, an alternate deputy from the Diocese of Central Florida.He said his congregation, Jesus of Nazareth Episcopal Church in Orlando, is half immigrants, and many are afraid. He described meeting in his office with a family, the little boy crying. His father already was facing a deadline for deportation, and his mother had to check in later this year with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.“We need a statement that says these families matter to this church,” he said in advocating for Resolution C033. “I’m losing parishioners because of deportation. Give me something I can use to give them hope. Give me something to reinforce the message that this church welcomes you, this church loves you.”The Rev. Devon Anderson of Minnesota, chair of the domestic policy committee, closed the hearing by thanking those who testified and the more than 100 people who attended.“Thank you for proclamations of hope and possibility for a presence of our church in the world around advocating for immigrants in our communities,” she said.Committee deliberations on the resolutions are scheduled for the morning of July 9.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] July 9, 2018 at 9:43 am Do you have any sources on that (and I mean reliable sources, not biased ones like Fox News or Breitbart)? I am very skeptical that what you said has happened. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 10, 2018 at 11:47 am Many illegals have sent their children alone to the border, so do not blame Trump for allseparations. Parents who are willing to risk their children in such a way are putting them in much more danger.We as a country need to make sure that the needy citizens , veterans homeless etc are also cared for. Legal immigration is the best solution,and stop the pity parties for those disregarding laws. Many churches are doing great work in caring for migrantswho come legally for work in the harvest industry. July 7, 2018 at 11:58 pm I think your response denotes sarcasm and not so much a Christian consern for the crimes against humanity that are being perpetrated by this presidents administration. I think though in support of your point a resolution supporting an end to foreign interventions and bring our troops home and close about half of our foreign military bases. If we can take our boys out of harms way we can prevent their children being orphaned. In the words of Jimmy Carter, war is sometimes a necessary evil but it is always evil. Bring them home, and don’t insult their blood sacrifice by using them to defend the assault on humanity on our border as so many people are doing these days. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Matt Ouellette says: Comments are closed. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 8, 2018 at 8:33 am OK Mr. & Mrs Do-Good. No borders? = No Sovereignty and no USA! No Borders = Cuba – Venezuala – Salvador – Honduras – Mexico – Guatemala – Syria – Iran – Turkey – Afghanistan – Somalia – What IS becoming of western Europe, the UK, and even Canada now – and all the rest.. NO USA any longer…So, to all of you… Your form of payment will be, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or American Express? Well, pony up! Put YOUR wallet where your mouth is! Rector Collierville, TN Bill Hemp says: Debbie scott says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ July 8, 2018 at 11:45 pm Wait, you think you have more rights than “illegals?” Are they less human than you? Do you not see the problem with your statement? And no, the crime against humanity is not defending the border, but ripping families apart for a misdemeanor offense (assuming they did cross illegally). July 8, 2018 at 11:54 pm No, it isn’t just illegal immigration. Trump has also stated he wants to reduce legal immigration as well:http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/promises/trumpometer/promise/1403/limit-legal-immigration/ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ william dailey says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 12, 2018 at 7:42 pm Oh, one more thing. Alot of you people were the same ones who cheered along while our military destabilized or outright destroyed many of these same people’s countries. I know because many times I was the only one in my church voicing these concerns while everyone in the congregation was praying for “our boys & girls in uniform”! Better we had let these people attend to their own nations. And now you want to just bring everyone in???How about this- come in and serve? My grandfather had his ass thrown right into World War I soon after he emigrated (legally). And NO WELFARE EITHER!!!Earn IT!!! July 8, 2018 at 10:33 pm I think we need to be clear the issue is illegal immigration. Fight for more refugee programs or maybe we need to intervene in Central America so people can stay in their countries. What can we do to help all the people in Central America. Better government address the drug epedemic here which causes many of those countries to ship us illegal drugs? Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 13, 2018 at 6:20 pm Bravo, very well stated! From a proud, but concerned retired vet! Jeff Zelem says: Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 12, 2018 at 7:37 pm Every state in the Union will remove the children from a home when the custodial parent is taken to jail. The children will be places first with a relative, if one can be found, or in a group home, or a foster home. The ignorance of arguing that these children coming across the border are different for the Children of citizens is beyond the pale. I do not hear complaints about the citizen children being removed. Robert Carrillo says: Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 9, 2018 at 5:30 pm I don’t see why we can’t live up to the motto on the Statue of Liberty: “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” That doesn’t mean we have to let everyone into this country, but I don’t see why we should discourage immigration, especially when it benefits our economy. July 8, 2018 at 1:06 pm The opening section of this article should at least state the facts. TheTrump administration’s stance is against ILLEGAL immigration, not all immigration. Misrepresentation of basic facts such as this cause me to doubt the accuracy of the rest of the article. Charles Pierce says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 12, 2018 at 7:31 pm Hysterical. Nobody mentions the monetary aspect as 99.5% of the $$’s used to support the Episcopal refugee group is federally funded….ie: taxpayer. Which is forced donations to something many people don’t support. In addition to the fact that most refugees end up on assisted living, welfare, etc etc for many years….even generations. These are facts as actual numbers don’t lie!Sure, this helps the illegals ( although I do wonder where so many get the money to pay the smugglers. How does someone from Bangladesh or Syria emigrate thru Mexico??? Hell, I couldn’t afford the airfare!). This doesn’t help the US as a whole which can’t even support its own! And with more automation coming, where are the jobs to support those that actually MIGHT want to work??Diseases that had essentially been eradicated in the US are on the upswing…so immigrants bring that cultural enrichment along. Yeah, yeah…I know…I must be racist because we can all see how greatly the invaders….er, refugees, are helping Europeans flourish. Hell, England has acid attacks now! That’s some serious cultural enrichment! And rape is thru the roof! So…hurray for the third world!No, this is about “how I make MY life better”! Perpetual welfare for the migrants and perpetual federal donations to the coffers of the church and her employees!Sweet! C’mon, just call it what it is! Youth Minister Lorton, VA Matt Ouellette says: General Convention, July 9, 2018 at 9:47 am Well, the evidence does not back up your claims about the negative impact of immigration on the economy. Also, there has been a net decrease in illegal migration anyways:http://www.politifact.com/wisconsin/statements/2017/apr/26/ron-kind/yes-experiencing-net-outflow-illegal-undocumented-/And we are talking about separating children from asylum-seekers, not people using false SSN’s. Hopefully we can at least agree that it is cruel to take the children of asylum-seekers away from their parents, right? Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

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Family will lead national Church of England Sunday service from…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Church of England TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Rev. Canon Leah Vasey-Saunders, the canon precentor of Wakefield Cathedral, West Yorkshire, will be assisted by her husband the Rev. Mark Vasey-Saunders, academic tutor at St. Hild College, and their children Miriam, 9, Elias, 12, Jude, 14, and Reuben, 16.The service for Low Sunday – the second Sunday of Easter – was recorded in the living room of their home in Wakefield and includes prayers, hymns and a family game. It explores what they have learned about faith through the challenges of living in lockdown.Read the entire article here. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Apr 17, 2020 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Communion, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Vasey-Saunders family of Wakefield, England. Photo courtesy of the Church of England[Church of England] A family from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, will lead the Church of England’s national virtual service from their living room on April 19. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Family will lead national Church of England Sunday service from their home Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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