Helicopters holding fire thats crossed into Canada at avalanche path

first_imgWATERTON, Alta. – Crews battling a wildfire near the U.S. border in Alberta are hoping an avalanche path will prevent the flames from spreading further into a national park that was badly burned last year.Dry and windy conditions Friday afternoon pushed the Boundary Wildfire north across the border for the first time into Waterton Lakes National Park in southwestern Alberta.Parks Canada says in a news release the area received a small amount of rain overnight, but it was so small that it couldn’t be measured, and Saturday’s forecast called for strong winds and sun.John Stoesser, a spokesman for Parks Canada, says the flames have reached a stretch of mountainside that has been swept mostly bare of trees by winter avalanches.Stoesser says sparks have crossed the avalanche zone and ignited spot fires on the eastern side.He says helicopters are dumping water on those spot fires to keep them from growing and burning further through the Boundary Valley towards the Waterton Valley.“When the fire burns through those coniferous trees leading towards the avalanche path, those are a little bit more flammable. But then when it reaches that avalanche path, there’s not as much trees there, there’s not as much vegetation there so the fire activity slows right down when it gets to that line,” Stoesser said in an interview Saturday.“So that’s why it’s a good place to drop water from the helicopters.”Parks Canada said two helicopters were on the job at the avalanche boundary on Saturday and that a third chopper was on its way.Stoesser said it’s an aerial effort at this point, since it’s steep, rocky terrain. Once the flames are knocked down a bit, he said firefighters can go into the area and do what they can from the ground.Waterton was devastated a year ago by a wildfire which consumed more than 190-square kilometres within the park and led to a two-week mandatory evacuation.An evacuation alert was issued last month for Waterton Lakes National Park due to the fire that’s been burning on the U.S side in Glacier National Park, but the alert was later lifted when the area got rain.A Parks Canada news release on Saturday said the agency and U.S. fire managers are working together and are in constant communication about fire activity and response.The fire is estimated to be about 11-square kilometres in size.last_img read more

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Adrian Grenier To Speak At Oceanic X Ibiza Event

first_imgAdrian Grenier will speak at Oceanic X Ibiza: A Festival For Our Ocean next week.Video: Oceanic x Ibiza : July 20thOn the 20th of July 2017, Oceanic will present its inaugural event as part of its city-by-city immersive experience series, set to take place in the heart of Ibiza, Spain.A conscious festival for our ocean, Oceanic x Ibiza will be a thoroughly cultural, artistic and inspirational experience. It will unite top musicians, celebrities, conservationists, institutions, NGOs and brands, transcending the barriers of language and human diversity to create a universal voice for our ocean.Oceanic x Ibiza is designed to transport participants through the depths of our ocean. Immersive content on-site will juxtapose the natural beauty of our ocean with the destructive impact of plastic and seafood consumption, as well as provide the Oceanic community with engaging solution for restoring ocean health.For more information, click here.last_img read more

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Eldorado shares fall as it cuts production guidance at Kisladag mine in

first_imgTORONTO – Shares in Eldorado Gold Corp. fell more than 10 per cent in late-morning trading after the gold miner cut its guidance for gold production from its Kisladag mine in Turkey.The stock was down 49 cents or about 18 per cent at $2.24 on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The company says gold recovery from the leach pad at the operation has lagged internal expectations.Eldorado says it now expects production from Kisladag this year to be 170,000 to 180,000 ounces at cash costs of $500 to $550 per ounce. It also placed its guidance for 2018 and beyond under review.The revised guidance was down from an estimate of 180,000 to 210,000 ounces in June and the company’s original 2017 guidance for 230,000 to 245,000 ounces.Eldorado, which has operations in Turkey, Greece, Canada, Romania, Serbia and Brazil, calls Kisladag its flagship gold mine.last_img read more

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Watchdog group urges probe of Ivanka Trump tax break role

first_imgWASHINGTON — A watchdog group is asking the Justice Department to investigate whether President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka violated federal conflict-of-interest law by her key role in promoting an Opportunity Zone tax break program from which she could potentially benefit.The complaint from the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington follows an Associated Press investigation last month. The AP found that, as White House aides, Trump and her husband Jared Kushner both backed the Opportunity Zones program, which could financially benefit the couple.Kushner owns a $25 million to $50 million stake in Cadre, a real estate platform has announced plans to invest in several cities under the Opportunity Zones program.The CREW complaint says that, under the law, Kushner’s financial interests are considered of value to Ivanka Trump.Stephen Braun, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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The NFL Is No League For Old Men

Carolina6 Teams that had the most players age 30 or older who started at least eight games last season Excludes kickers and puntersSource: Pro-Football-Reference.com Could there be a market inefficiency in older players today, similar to the one that Allen exploited nearly 50 years ago? It seems like Jon Gruden is determined to find out. Last year, the Raiders had eight 30-something starters, tied with Arizona for the league high. A total of six — safety Reggie Nelson, tackle Donald Penn, running back Marshawn Lynch, tight ends Jared Cook and Lee Smith, and defensive end Bruce Irvin — remain. And the team has added linebacker Derrick Johnson (36 this year), safety Marcus Gilchrist (30) and wideout Jordy Nelson (33) as projected starters. Plus, the team signed 32-year-old Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie last week to fortify an injury-depleted defensive backfield. Gruden was surprised that he was even available.“Somebody that has a history in this league,” the Raiders coach said to The Fresno Bee. “He’s got a lot of clout, and a lot of people know who he is. We’re hoping we can rejuvenate him and get him acclimated to our defense and potentially utilize his skills he’s proven for a long time.”So it seems like the Raiders are set to put a lot more gray into the Silver and Black. For that, in today’s NFL, they don’t have much competition. Buffalo6 Oakland8 Roster construction appears to be a big factor. Last year, the eight division winners spent an average of 52.1 percent of their total salary cap on their top 10 players.2The Saints spent the lowest share on their best players at 42.4 percent, but that was due largely to one of the most productive rookie classes in history. And players on rookie contracts, which span up to five years when including option years for first-rounders, are huge bargains relative to their level of on-field production. That left only about half the available money for 80 percent of those teams’ rosters. This would mean that a lot of minimum contracts are being used to fill in the gaps — and because minimum salaries increase according to service time, only the elite 30-somethings may be surviving.This isn’t necessarily the wrong strategy. Once they hit 30, average players are either in the midst of or rapidly approaching the downside of their careers. Data shows that players at all positions generally see performance declines by age 30, with players’ peak ages ranging from 24 for running backs to 28 for most offensive linemen and quarterbacks. The subsequent declines are gradual from year to year, but the result is pronounced for all positions. So teams seem to be prioritizing younger players who are hitting their peak or ascending at the expense of veterans.There are certainly high-profile examples of older players still at the top of their game. But even the New England Patriots, who have been witness to the age-defying brilliance of 41-year-old Tom Brady, haven’t stockpiled older players. Brady was joined by only three other Pats players 30 or older who started at least eight games last year: Danny Amendola, Patrick Chung and Devin McCourty. And the Patriots let Amendola leave via free agency to the Dolphins.Teams in the past have bucked this trend, though. The George Allen-coached Washington teams in the 1970s were nicknamed “The Over-The-Hill Gang” after they systematically traded draft picks for veterans. In 1971, the average age of Allen’s starters was 29.4, and the team had 11 starters over the age of 30. But Washington won nine games that season and 11 the following year, in which they regularly started nine 30-somethings en route to the NFC championship. Baltimore7 Arizona8 You could hardly find a group of people less likely to share an ethos with the counterculture movement of the 1960s than NFL decision makers. But increasingly, they don’t seem to trust anyone over the age of 30, either.In 2007, there were 201 players — not including kickers and punters — over 30 who started at least eight games, according to Pro-Football-Reference.com.1Pro-Football-Reference.com gives a player’s age for the season as the age he was on Dec. 31 of that season. That number was down to 133 last season, equating to roughly four per team. That’s a drop of 33.8 percent. Miami6 Cincinnati7 TeamNo. Players Age 30+ read more

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Crane logistics group gets A100 million Olympic Dam contract

first_imgBoom Logistics, Australia’s leading provider of crane logistics and related industrial services, has confirmed that following a competitive tender process, it has secured a five year contract to supply crane services to the BHP Billiton Olympic Dam maintenance operation. This represents a new business opportunity for Boom and the contract is scheduled to commence on 1 June 2012. Olympic Dam is an underground mine 564 km north of Adelaide, and is a globally important producer of copper, uranium, gold and silver. In October 2011, BHP Billiton announced approval for $1.2 billion of pre-commitment capital for the first phase of the Olympic Dam Expansion project to develop the operation into a major new open pit mine. This funding will facilitate the procurement of long lead items such as trucks and accommodation, infrastructure development and early site works for the first phase of the project.The Boom Mobile Cranes Services contract involves setting up a purpose built maintenance facility in Roxby Downs, establishing a contract management team and providing dedicated cranes and labour to deliver all crane related maintenance works at Olympic Dam. Revenue from this new contract will be approximately A$100 million over the next five years with capital investment in the order of A$20 million. Over the last four years, Boom has progressively been aligning its Crane Logistics business with the mining and resources sector. At the end of 2011, this sector accounted for 58% of its yearly revenue and this level will continue to increase as a result of this contract win and in-line with growth expectations in this sector.Brenden Mitchell, CEO of Boom said: “This new contract is in line with our strategy of building long term sustainable revenue in the resources sector with quality customers committed to safety. It also confirms our value proposition and consolidates our position as the leading crane logistics provider across Australia. Our experience and knowledge of BHP Billiton’s operations in Western Australia, Queensland and NSW, and our commitment to our customers’ quality and safety frameworks, were some of the key factors in securing this new contract. This contract further broadens Boom’s national footprint by establishing a more substantial presence in South Australia. This contract will strengthen our position in FY13 and beyond.”last_img read more

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Atlas Copco marks sale of 100th ST7 Scooptram

first_imgAtlas Copco is celebrating the sale of its 100th Scooptram ST7 loader, confirming the international success of this new generation LHD in terms of underground loading technology and design. Vostok – Metall TransLLP of Kazakhstan has become the company to place an order for the world’s 100th machine. The loader, to be delivered in July, will be used for contracting underground development work at Ridder- Sokolnyi mine which is a gold mine operated by Kazzinc, located in East Kazakhstan region. This milestone sale confirms the global success of this Scooptram model since its launch in 2010.The ST7 journey began at the field test stage when Sweden’s Lovisa mine gave it “top marks for productivity, serviceability and comfort, reporting dramatic improvements in loading operations as well as the operator’s underground working environment.” The German industrial minerals group, Geomin Erzgebirgische Kalkwerke, became the first in Germany to introduce the Scooptram ST7 at its white marble mine in Hermsdorf near the Czech border, recently visited by IM. Service intervals are longer than for older generation LHDs at the mine, and fewer spare parts are needed due to improved parts wear. The vehicle features an air conditioned cab, lower noise levels, improved lighting and more efficient emergency/alarm systems. It also has excellent traction control which is easy on the tires, meaning fewer tyre changes or longer tyre life. The on-board computer calculates the optimum power needed at any one time during operations, resulting in lower fuel consumption and lower emissions, compared with operating on full throttle for most of the time.The new Scooptram ST7 is a high performance loader with a 6.8 t tramming capacity, articulated steering and oscillating rear axle. It has a comfortable and ISO FOPS/ROPS certified cab, a tramming height of 2,160 mm and a width of 2,280 mm.last_img read more

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3M launches new hearing protection range for mining

first_imgDiversified technology company 3M has announced the launch of the Peltor X ear defenders series, a new range of ear defenders offering enhanced comfort and protection. The Peltor X ear defenders range by 3M consists of five different models offering increasing levels of protection, each available as a headband or helmet-mounted version giving ten products in total. The Peltor X5 ear defenders model is protective enough to deal with high-noise environments such as mines and processing plants, offering “the highest attenuation of the range and the greatest level of protection currently available on the ear defender market” (SNR 37dB). The range is colour-coded to provide easy recognition between levels, while the modern styling and comfortable fit can help to aid workplace compliance.Sarah Broadbent, Technical Services Engineer for the 3M Personal Safety Division, says: “Combining the latest attenuation techniques with the leading features of our existing Peltor brand Optime ear defenders range by 3M has led to the development of the Peltor X Series. The Peltor X5 model in particular is ideally suited for mine staff who require the highest levels of protection against noise. The five levels of protection offered by the Peltor X Series from 3M make it suitable for a wide range of industries and applications, while the new foam sealing rings on the higher-attenuating products minimise bulk, making it easy to incorporate with other pieces of personal protective equipment without compromising on safety.”last_img read more

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Stolen condoms arent safe for sex manufacturer warns thieves

first_imgCAN’T GET THOSE condoms out of the vending machine?Blowing it up is NOT the answer.That’s the message a condom manufacturer is sending to the thieves who opted to resort to explosive measures in order to get what they wanted.The Local reports that a Ritex condom machine in Aachen, Germany was blown up some time between Sunday night and Monday morning.A police statement released on Tuesday revealed that a nearby resident heard a “large bang” at around midnight. “The perpetrators must have used a very large firecracker or a homemade explosive. The machine is completely destroyed”, police spokesman Thomas Hinz told N24.A number of condoms and a sum of money is believed to have been stolen but Ritex isn’t taking the hard line with the offending individuals.In fact, they’re offering some friendly advice via their spokeswoman:The condom packaging is likely to have been damaged by the explosion. As soon as the packaging is damaged, the condoms are no longer safe.Some might go as far as to say they’re a bit of a soft touch. Source: GiphyAre these lads actually the 25 biggest Irish rides?>This condom ad is ‘The Talk’ you NEVER want to have>last_img read more

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BlackBerry Bold 9790 launch sparks riot in Indonesia

first_imgHere in North America, RIM has had a bit of a rough year. The PlayBook struggles to compete against the iPad (even at $199) and BlackBerry phones have steadily lost share even in the business world where they once dominated. There was also that black-eye of a service outage, which led the company to offer up millions of dollars in free apps and business support.But there’s a whole world out there beyond Android and iPhone-loving North America. In some countries, the BlackBerry brand is as strong as ever. Places like Indonesia, where a recent handset launch resulted in a large-scale riot.The stage was set when a store in Jakarta announced a launch-day price cut on the BlackBerry Bold 9790. For the first 1,000 customers, the new Bold would be half price: $270 instead of the $540 the unlucky remainder of the crowd would be paying. A crowd began forming on Thursday night and by launch day morning more than 3,000 BlackBerry-hungry shoppers were ready to storm the gates.When doors opened, the Bold quickly sold out. That didn’t sit well with the thousands of locals who missed out, though riot police on the scene were able to keep the situation under control. While several faintings were reported (over a BlackBerry? Really?), the bruhaha paled in comparison to one earlier this week in Jakarta.Two soccer fans lost their lives  as the Gelora Bung Karno stadium crowd rushed in prior to the opening kick of the Southeast Asian Games final. Several other fans were taken to hospital.More at Yahoolast_img read more

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Changement climatique une base de données pour centraliser les recherches

first_imgChangement climatique : une base de données pour centraliser les recherchesL’ONERC vient de mettre en ligne une base de données réunissant des informations sur les projets de recherche auxquels la France a participé depuis 2008. Ce lancement entre dans le cadre du plan national d’adaptation au changement climatique présenté le 21 juillet dernier par le gouvernement. On devrait y voir plus clair sur les recherches scientifiques conduites sur le thème du réchauffement climatique. En effet, l’Observatoire national sur les effets du réchauffement climatique (Onerc) vient de mettre en ligne sur son site Internet (lien non disponible) une base de données centralisant diverses recherches menées depuis 2008. Des études achevées ou en cours, réalisées par des organismes publics français, mais aussi au niveau européen et mondial, qui couvrent prioritairement la France et l’Outre-mer, précise l’Onerc.À lire aussiUne scientifique compose la terrifiante musique du réchauffement climatique (Vidéo)Cette base de données, dont la création était prévue par le plan national d’adaptation au changement climatique présenté au mois de juillet, “a pour but de faciliter et accélérer la diffusion des résultats de la recherche”, souligne le ministère de l’Environnement. Et si elle ne saurait être exhaustive, elle sera régulièrement mise à jour, promet-t-il. Les chercheurs, décideurs, ONG, bureaux d’études, comme le grand public, pourront affiner leurs recherches au sein de la base de données développée avec le Groupement d’Intérêt Scientifique Climat-Environnement-Société, selon divers critères comme les zones géographiques ou les milieux concernés par les projets.Le 7 octobre 2011 à 15:34 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Berbatov Pogba has nothing to prove at Man United

first_imgA world champion like Paul Pogba doesn’t need to prove anything to anyone, says former Manchester United striker Dimitar BerbatovThe French midfielder was left out of United’s 4-1 win over Fulham in the Premier League on Saturday after making a 15-minute cameo against Arsenal last week.However, United manager Jose Mourinho confirmed Pogba will be recalled to the starting line-up for their final Group H game at Valencia tonight in the Champions League.The 25-year-old has endured a frustrating start to the 2018/19 campaign, but a strong performance at the Mestalla could lead to further starting opportunities.Although Berbatov doesn’t believe the pressure is on Pogba to perform.“Pogba does not need to show how good he is because we know he’s a good player, he’s a world champion,” Berbatov told BT Sport.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…“Obviously people expect a lot from him, sometimes maybe too much, and he can’t do it all by himself.“He’s got nothing to prove but hopefully he can get his game going and I don’t think this is a sign that means he definitely won’t play against Liverpool. Maybe it is, but I don’t know.“Sometimes even if you play a lot of games in a row you can still feel good. Say for example, Pogba scores twice against Valencia what does that mean for the Liverpool game?“Personally I would like to see him do well in the Champions League, not just him but the whole team, and then play against Liverpool.”Berbatov also added that Leicester City defender Harry Maguire would be an ideal January signing for his old club.The Valencia-United game will begin at 21:00 (CET) tonight.last_img read more

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Man arrested after reportedly breaking into 10 vehicles in Miami

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – A man suspected of burglarizing 10 vehicles on Christmas Day has been arrested.Miami Police arrested 30-year-old Stetson Pierre in connection to the break-ins at an apartment building on Northwest Second Avenue and 57th Street, Tuesday.Officials said residents woke up to shattered glass and items missing in the parking garage of the building.The 30-year-old has since been charged with burglary.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Legislative Analyst Offers Gloomy Budget Outlook

first_imgEach week during the legislative session, various interest groups and lawmakers will host catered lunches as a way of drawing staffers to learn about their pet issues. Often, the selling point is the pizza or the sandwiches. But this Thursday, the food was beside the point. A standing-room-only crowd gathered to watch a special budget presentation that had been discussed in murmurs for weeks. APRN’s Alexandra Gutierrez reports that the outlook was somewhere between gloomy and apocalyptic.Download AudioThe Legislative Finance director’s model illustrated what he had long been saying:“You simply cannot cut your way to a sustainable budget.”Manipulating an Excel spreadsheet with dozens of inputs, David Teal showed what would happen if the state cut formula programs, added a variety of taxes, and shrunk its agencies. None of the actions taken on their own made any difference. At projected oil prices, the state still does not close its multi-billion-dollar deficit.Teal played with one scenario where the Legislature cuts its budget by 12 percent each year until the state’s $1.4 billion education program was shrunk to $400 million. When the model continued to show a deficit, the audience muttered a few “wows.” House Finance Co-Chair Steve Thompson had to stop Teal at another scenario. Whole agency operations were shut down — and still, the state faced a shortfall.THOMPSON: You mean no state troopers? No [Department of Transportation]?TEAL: No Corrections. No prisons.THOMPSON: No prison guards? All of those?TEAL: But of course that isn’t workable.The only scenario that seemed to make a difference was one where the state cut spending, oil prices rose some, a modest income tax was implemented, and the state drew some money from the Permanent Fund earnings reserve while paying out a potentially smaller dividend. That account is separate from the Permanent Fund’s principal, and legislators can draw on it at any point with a simple majority vote. However, the fund is a third rail, and rarely discussed because of its political consequences.That was illustrated halfway through the presentation when Sen. Bill Wielechowski, an Anchorage Democrat, logged onto Twitter from his phone and accused the Republican House Majority of making moves to “raid the Permanent Fund.” He elaborated on the comment after the presentation.“When you talk about raiding the Permanent Fund what you’re talking about is taking money out of the earnings reserve and using it for government expenses or using it for something else other than paying out dividends,” said Wielechowski.Thompson, who sponsored the lunch-and-learn event, responded with some exasperation to the suggestion.“We’re not raiding the Permanent Fund, and nobody’s going to do that. I mean, I don’t even see how that’s even a possibility,” said Thompson. “We’ve got to have a discussion about how can we fund the core services that are expected under our Constitution by the citizens of Alaska.”The Fairbanks Republican said the purpose of the presentation, which came from a non-partisan analyst, was to give the public a better understanding of the state’s fiscal outlook. The model had already been shown to many lawmakers and some staff, but — with only a few weeks of session to go — had not been public until now.Rep. Les Gara, another Anchorage Democrat who was in attendance, said he did find value in seeing the hard numbers, even if he would have liked to see more attention to the effect different policies on oil taxes and credits have on the state budget.“I think it’s worthwhile to have over, and over, and over again for the public to see all over the state so they can plug in numbers,” said Gara. “Look, if they’re oil tax people, they can say, ‘What would oil tax changes do?’ If they believe in other sources of revenue, they can plug in those numbers. But I think it’s important to lead to an honest public discussion.”The Walker administration also had at least one member present. Tax Division Director Ken Alper said he thought the presentation captured the urgency of the state’s budget situation. He added that the executive branch is working on its own model as it figures out the next step in tackling the revenue shortfall. But he stressed that for now, the focus is simply on cutting the budget.last_img read more

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OnePlus 7 Pro camera samples show promising results day or night

first_img OnePlus 6T Thunder Purple Review: Fashionable and classy OnePlus 7 and OnePlus 7 Pro are one of the most anticipated flagships of 2019 and the wait is almost over. On May 14, the Chinese smartphone maker will unveil the OnePlus 7 series to finally end the suspense around its features, specifications and price. But before that, OnePlus decided to let a Wired reporter try out the triple camera setup and the results seem promising.OnePlus phones have always managed to ace performance, usability, design and battery, but the cameras haven’t been the strongest suit. As companies have come up with phones featuring 4-5 lenses and delivering the impossible in terms of mobile photography, OnePlus is catching up to the trend by offering a triple camera setup in its upcoming OnePlus 7 Pro.Rumours have indicated that the OnePlus 7 Pro will sport a 48MP primary sensor alongside a 16MP ultra-wide-angle lens and an 8MP telephoto sensor. The Wired’s Andrew Williams, who had the chance to test the OnePlus 7 Pro’s camera before release, did not go on to spoil the surprise, but OnePlus’ imaging director Simon Liu was more than willing to shell out a few details.”I think we have a shot at competing with the first tier phones. I don’t think we can beat them, but the imaging world is always subjective,” Liu said of the new OnePlus 7 Pro camera. But a lot of advancements have been made in areas of zoom, portrait and low-light, which have been shown with examples in the Wired report. OnePlus is expected to launch three dual-tone OnePlus 7 models with gradient finishT3 via Tiger MobilesOnePlus 7 Pro will support 3x optical zoom, an upgrade from 2x zoom in the 6T model. While some rumours suggested that there might be a ToF lens in the setup, it is now clear that the special depth sensor won’t be included after all. Despite that, the 7 Pro is said to support 10x digital zoom, which is no match for Huawei P30 Pro’s 50x zoom, but certainly gets the job done. OnePlus is relying on software for its 10x zoom.At first glance, the shots taken during the day or night seem promising. The details are just about right, there’s high dynamic range and shooting a subject with the sun in the background didn’t seem to be much of a problem for OnePlus 7 Pro, thanks to the improved Auto HDR option.”We’re bringing a lot more clarity and density to our pictures. Our pictures are a lot more detailed compared to our previous phones,” Liu told Wired. The report also suggests that OnePlus 7’s camera uses pixel binning to create 12MP images and the option to create photos at full resolution was not available at the time of testing. Pixel binning is a technique used to reduce noise in images. OnePlus 7 Pro hands-on images leakWeiboFinally, OnePlus 7 Pro’s bokeh effect is going to be more natural although we did not see any samples proving that claim. “The bokeh effect is closer to what you’d get from a professional lens. Previously it was more artificial, to prove that there is an effect, but when you’re using a digital camera, it’s not actually that strong,” Liu explained.The biggest takeaways from the OnePlus 7 Pro’s hands-on test is that the cameras are vastly improved over the predecessors and this could be the flagship ready to compete in the big league with the likes of Samsung, Huawei and Google. We will be testing out the handset to see how much of the 7 Pro’s camera claims are true, so stay tuned. Closelast_img read more

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Alibaba Singles Day sales hit 10 billion in first hour

first_imgJack Ma, founder-chairman of Chinese e-commerce firm AlibabaIANSChinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd settled roughly 69 billion yuan ($9.92 billion) in the first hour of its annual Singles’ Day on Sunday, up roughly 21 percent from last year’s early haul of 57 billion yuan.Singles’ Day is the world’s biggest online sales event and last year netted Alibaba 168 billion yuan ($24.15 billion) in total sales.A disproportionately large number of sales are recorded in the first minutes of the 24-hour spending spree when transactions are recorded for items that have been put on hold.Alibaba kicks off the annual event with a gala, which this year featured US singer Mariah Carey, a Japanese Beyonce impersonator and a shoe-shopping-themed Cirque du Soleil performance.It’s expected to be the company’s final November sale event with founder and chairman Jack Ma at the helm. Current chief executive Daniel Zhang will take over as chairman next year, the company said in September.While sales growth remains steady, Alibaba’s stock has dropped 16 percent this year amid economic uncertainties linked to brewing trade tensions between China and the United States.Earlier this month, Alibaba revised down its full-year revenue forecast, sending a chill through investors, as it said sales of big-ticket items would be impacted.To compensate, the company will take in less income from its platforms in the near term in order to retain brands and new buyers, it said.This year, Alibaba said there were around 180,000 brands participating in Singles’ Day, and as of 10 a.m. on Sunday sales were close to $20 billion. ($1 = 6.9553 yuan)last_img read more

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Budget session of Jatiya Sangsad begins

first_imgJatiya Sangsad. File PhotoThe first budget session of the 11th parliament got underway with speaker Shirin Sharmin in the chair on Tuesday afternoon, reports news agency UNB.Before the House went into the session at 5:00pm, the business advisory committee of parliament sat in a meeting to fix the duration and businesses of the session.President Abdul Hamid on 13 May summoned the third session of the 11th parliament exercising the power bestowed upon him as per Article 72 (1) of the constitution.Finance minister AHM Mustafa Kamal will place the proposed national budget in parliament on Thursday.The size of the budget for the upcoming 2019-20 fiscal is likely to cross Tk 5 trillion.On 7 June 2018, former finance minister AMA Muhith placed a Tk 4.64 trillion budget for the 2018-19 fiscal.last_img read more

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Study shows Australian jack jumper ants navigate using landmarks

first_img Citation: Study shows Australian jack jumper ants navigate using landmarks (2013, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-australian-jack-jumper-ants-landmarks.html (Phys.org) —A trio of researchers from The Australian National University has found that solitary foraging jack jumper ants take mental snapshots of the terrain as they move around. This allows the ants, the team notes in their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, to find their way home using landmark identification. More information: Mapping the navigational knowledge of individually foraging ants, Myrmecia croslandi, Published 26 June 2013 doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.0683AbstractAnts are efficient navigators, guided by path integration and visual landmarks. Path integration is the primary strategy in landmark-poor habitats, but landmarks are readily used when available. The landmark panorama provides reliable information about heading direction, routes and specific location. Visual memories for guidance are often acquired along routes or near to significant places. Over what area can such locally acquired memories provide information for reaching a place? This question is unusually approachable in the solitary foraging Australian jack jumper ant, since individual foragers typically travel to one or two nest-specific foraging trees. We find that within 10 m from the nest, ants both with and without home vector information available from path integration return directly to the nest from all compass directions, after briefly scanning the panorama. By reconstructing panoramic views within the successful homing range, we show that in the open woodland habitat of these ants, snapshot memories acquired close to the nest provide sufficient navigational information to determine nest-directed heading direction over a surprisingly large area, including areas that animals may have not visited previously. Explore further Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Sugar ants ‘know when they’re lost’ Ants are known to use various methods to find their way home after foraging, most notably path integration. This is where ants record distance traveled and in what direction as they march around and then use that information to help them find their way home. In this new effort, the researchers found that when foraging relatively close to home, jack jumper ants also note landmarks as they travel that they can use to create a mental map that leads back to their nest.In a prior study carried out by researchers at Australia’s Vision Centre, it was found that bull ants had more difficulty finding their way home in the dark than in the light of day. This suggested they use landmarks as navigation aids. Building on these findings, the researchers in this new study collected 50 jack jumper ants and moved them various distances from the nest, then watched (using differential GPS) to see if they could find their way home. The group found that at distances of 10 meters or less, the ants were able to look around them then head straight for home. In contrast, when the researchers carried the ants 100 meters from their nest, the ants were confused and attempted to use path integration to orient themselves.These findings suggested the ants were using landmarks to find their way home. To add credence to their theory, the team used cameras to study the terrain in which the ants had been released; these cameras allowed the researchers to look around from the vantage point of the ants. Doing so allowed them to very clearly see that various landmarks provided the ants sufficient information to guide their trip home. As the distance from the nest was increased, however, the team found it more and more difficult to use landmark information to create a return map.Based on their observations, the researchers conclude that the ants do indeed use landmarks as a form of navigational aid. They note also that this simple ability far outstrips the abilities of current robots, thus jack jumper ants may serve as a model for robot builders looking to improve navigational skills in their creations. © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor InSite One offers InDex vendor-neutral archive solutions for medical imaging and associated data. The imaging electronic health record (EHR) allows not only the physician, but also the patient to share medical data.The company also offers cloud services and recently was chosen to provide cloud services to manage data for the continent of South Africa, expanding its healthcare business model into another arena. In the healthcare industry, it has a number of customers that have successfully implemented its InDex solution.At RSNA 2010, the focus was also on imaging sharing, and InSite One demonstrated multiple ways to share information and its hosted health information exchange (HIE) capabilities.For more information: www.insiteone.com Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Find more SCCT news and videos RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports View all 9 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting.center_img Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Women’s Health View all 62 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Videos | March 22, 2011 InSite One – VNA, Cloud Services and Multiple Ways to Share Information Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Information Technology View all 220 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Conference Coverage View all 396 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophylast_img read more

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Langham to triple global footprint

first_imgLangham Place Beijing Capital Airport – Lobby The Langham Xintiandi, Shanghai – Exterior Over the next three years Langham Hotels International plan to add to its current portfolio of ten hotels with another 24 slated to open across the globe.Langham Hotels International Global Sales Director Sharon Byrne announced in Sydney last week plans to open The Langham, Xintiandi, Shanghai, on 1 October 2010, its second property in the city.The 24-storey luxury hotel will boast 357 elegant rooms and 23 suites in true Langham style, Ms Byrne said.“We’re delighted to be expanding The Langham brand in China with an iconic new property…that will see the group become recognised as a leader in luxury hospitality in China,” Langham Hotels International Chief Executive Brett Butcher said.Also in China, opening next month, the five-star Langham Place, Beijing Capital Airport will be the closest airport to Beijing Airport’s new Terminal 3.“It’s rare to hear the word ‘stylish’ in the same sentence as ‘airport hotel’,” Ms Byrne said, pointing out the hotel will live up to the ‘Langham Place’ brand. “We’re establishing a strong footprint where we see a strategic need,” Mr Butcher said.  “These include Thailand and major gateway cities from Singapore to Sydney and through Europe, the Middle East and North America.”As the expansion continues into the next three years, Langham Hotels International will add 10,000 rooms to 34 global locations.Langham Hotels International, the Hong Kong-based company owns and manages The Langham, Langham Place and affiliate brands Eaton Luxe and Eaton Smart.center_img Source = e-Travel Blackboard: G.Alast_img read more

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