Fisheries groups opposing Nova Scotia mills proposed effluent treatment plant

first_imgHALIFAX – Opposition is mounting against a plan by a kraft pulp mill in Nova Scotia to pump treated waste into the Northumberland Strait, with a group of Maritime fisheries organizations saying the effluent could harm marine life.The group, which includes the Pictou Landing First Nation in Nova Scotia, said the proposal from Northern Pulp Nova Scotia Corp. could see the release of up to 90 million litres of effluent per day into the strait, posing a threat to fish species and protected areas along the coastline.The other members of the group include the Gulf Nova Scotia Fleet Planning Board, the Maritime Fishermen’s Union, the Prince Edward Island Fishermen’s Association and the New Brunswick Fisheries Association.Under provincial legislation, Northern Pulp has until 2020 to replace its current effluent treatment plant in Boat Harbour near Pictou, N.S. — a deadline the company has said will be tough to meet.The group said other options should be explored, such as a land-based effluent treatment facility. They said rigorous scientific research is needed to assess the impact.“The provincial government is asking us to take 100 per cent of the risk. Our concern is what is in the effluent. What’s going to do to our fishery? What’s the construction of the pipe going to do to our fishery?” said Ron Heighton, president of the Gulf Nova Scotia Fleet Planning Board.Local fishermen, Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq chiefs and Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan are among those who have voiced concerns about Northern Pulp’s plan, saying it could have unintended consequences for fisheries in the area.Kathy Cloutier, spokeswoman for Paper Excellence Canada, which owns Northern Pulp, said in an email statement that effluent has been flowing into the strait for 50 years, and the proposed drainage site is not far from the current one.“The new system will make it so that the treated effluent, in part due to planned in-mill improvements, will be of better quality with a smaller environmental footprint than what is currently in place,” Cloutier said.She said the company investigated its treatment options and determined it needed a drainage point to pump waste.“The bottom line is no pipe equals no mill,” she said.Cloutier added: “Scientific studies are being completed with rigour, and First Nations, community and stakeholder engagement is occurring throughout the study.”The mill in Abercrombie, N.S., announced plans for a new treatment plant in December and is to submit an environmental assessment to Nova Scotia’s Environment Department in July.According to the company’s plan, waste would be treated at a new facility near the mill using a system that would meet all federal environmental standards.The effluent would be carried by polyethylene pipe across Pictou Harbour and then released through six pipes into the strait.Nova Scotia’s deputy environment minister Frances Martin faced questions about the plan at a public accounts committee meeting last month. She said she made the decision to go with a Class 1 environmental assessment last June after Northern Pulp filed a project description with the department at the end of April.She said it was clear to her the project required a Class 1 assessment instead of the more lengthy Class 2 under provincial regulations. Martin said Class 2 assessments are used in cases of larger projects, such as the building of a petro-chemical plant or pulp mill.But Heighton said he would like to see a federal environmental assessment.“We need every bit of science so we can understand what’s going on,” said Heighton. “We cannot accept anything less.”— Follow (at)AlyThomson on Twitter.last_img read more

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La Mamounia in Marrakech Best Urban Hotel in the World

Rabat – The prestigious hotel la Mamounia of Marrakech has been awarded “Best Urban Hotel in the World” in the Spanish version of UK travel magazine Condé Nast Traveler.Managing Director Pierre Jochem received the award Thursday, May 10, during the 10th ceremony of “Traveler 2018 Awards.”The hotel has won numerous awards since it reopened in 2009. The award confirms la Mamounia’s position as the flagship of the Moroccan hotel industry. La Mamounia was built in 1923 but received a makeover at the hands of French designer Jacques Garcia in 2009.In traditional Moroccan style, complete with intricate patterns and arabesques based on Berber and Arab-Andalusian architecture, la Mamounia is set in royal gardens, marked by Moorish opulence. The hotel, situated near the famous Jamaa El Fna Square has 209 rooms (including 71 suites), gardens, a spa with hammams (Moroccan traditional baths), and three riads.In 2016, the British newspaper The Independent ranked la Mamounia’s garden  the fourth best garden retreat in the world.In 2015, the hotel was ranked the world’s best hotel in Conde Nast Traveller’s annual reader poll.La Mamounia’s spa was named the world’s best hotel spa by the same magazine in 2011, Hotel of the Year in 2010 by Tatler Travel Guide, and Best Resort in 2010 by Travel and Leisure. read more

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UNESCO joins forces with Belgian tennis ace to encourage sporting values

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is teaming up next week with the world’s top female tennis player, Belgium’s Justine Henin, to promote sporting values such as fair play and honesty and to warn of the dangers of using performance-enhancing drugs.The agency is taking part in the Paris Stade Français Youth Tennis Open – BNP Paribas Cup, an international tournament for players aged 13 or 14 years that starts on Monday at the Stade Français tennis club in Paris.At a village set up at the tournament site, UNESCO will conduct a series of educational workshops, interactive games and other activities that will be open to the young players and also to parents and coaches. The workshops will focus on doping in sports and on the importance of developing good values, particularly team spirit, integrity and mutual respect.On Monday, Ms. Henin – who won the BNP Paribas Cup herself in 1996 – will speak to the junior players about doping in sports and sporting ethics. The 25-year-old, the number-one ranked player in the world and the winner of six Grand Slam titles during her career, reached the semi-finals of the women’s singles event at Wimbledon this week.This is the fifth year that UNESCO has been involved in the running of the tournament, which is expected to bring together teenage tennis stars from more than 60 countries. 6 July 2007The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is teaming up next week with the world’s top female tennis player, Belgium’s Justine Henin, to promote sporting values such as fair play and honesty and to warn of the dangers of using performance-enhancing drugs. read more

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Closing Bell TSX in the red ahead of corporate earnings economic data

TORONTO — A drop in energy stocks helped push the Toronto stock market slightly lower Monday as traders brace for a heavy slate of earnings reports this week, particularly from the resource sector.Here are the closing numbersTSX — 15,445.22 -9.82 -0.06%S&P 500 —  1,978.91 0.57  0.03%Dow — 16,982.59 22.02  0.13%Nasdaq — 4,444.91 -4.65 -0.10%The S&P/TSX composite index gave back 9.82 points to 15,445.22.“This week will be jam-packed with information for investors to digest,” said Craig Fehr, Canadian markets specialist at Edward Jones in St. Louis.The Canadian dollar rose 0.12 of a cent at 92.59 cents US.New York markets were mainly positive as the Dow Jones industrials moved ahead 22.02 points at 16,982.59, the Nasdaq lost 4.65 points to 4,444.91 and the S&P 500 index was up 0.57 of a point to 1,978.91.Big names in the Canadian gold mining and energy sector, such as Barrick Gold Corp. (TSX:ABX) and Suncor Energy (TSX:SU), report their second-quarter results this week. Those two sectors are the best performing on the TSX year to date with energy up about 19% while the gold sector is up about 28% — but that’s after being cut in half last year. The energy sector is actually the leading advancer since its market weighting is far heavier than gold.“This is an important week for the TSX because those two areas, gold and energy, have been the areas that have led the TSX to a 15% total return so far this year — huge gains in those sectors,” added Fehr.Bombardier (TSX:BBD.B) also reports its results Thursday. Its shares are close to its 52-week low of $3.44 and investors will be looking for an update on the development of the company’s crucial CSeries airliner, which has been beset by a series of delays. Its shares slipped four cents to $3.61.The energy sector led TSX decliners, down 0.84% as September crude on the New York Mercantile Exchange lost 42 cents to US$101.67 a barrel.Athabasca Oil Corp. (TSX:ATH) shares fell 47 cents or 6.83% to $6.41 as the company seeks to reassure investors that it is working to close a $1.23-billion oilsands asset sale to PetroChina.Techs were also weak with BlackBerry (TSX:BB) down 37 cents to $10.75 after CEO John Chen told Bloomberg Television that he has no acquisition offers on his desk. He said BlackBerry is focused on turning its ailing business around independently, and its chances of success are “better than 80/20.”The TSX closed well off the worst levels of the session as the gold sector finished positive, up about 0.8% as August bullion closed unchanged at US$1,303.30 an ounce.The TSX base metals sector led TSX advancers, up 1.11% while September copper was unchanged at US$3.24 a pound.There was also major acquisition activity in the U.S. where Dollar Tree is buying rival discount store Family Dollar in a cash-and-stock deal valued at about US$8.5 billion.The data calendar for Canada is light this week with only one major report. Statistics Canada posts May gross domestic product figures on Thursday. Economists are looking for a 0.3% gain for the month.In the U.S., traders will look to second-quarter GDP data out Tuesday, the Federal Reserve makes its scheduled announcement on interest rates on Wednesday and on Friday, the U.S. government releases its employment report for July.TOP STORIESAthabasca Oil shares dive on worries over PetroChina $1.23-billion paymentCMHC turns up scrutiny of condo investors as concerns of overheated market growBlackBerry CEO says turnaround’s chances of success ‘better than 80/20,’ no buyout offers on tableRussia ordered to pay $50-billion to shareholders, 10 years after it seized oil giant YukosWHAT’S ON DECK TUESDAYECONOMIC NEWSCANADAUNITED STATES9 a.m.S&P Case-Shiller home price index (May): Economists expect 0.3% rise, 9.9% rise year over year Homeownership and residential vacancy rates (Q2) 10 a.m.Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index (July): Economists expect reading of 85.5 CORPORATE NEWSCANADAGeorge Weston Limited    Q2 earnings: Analysts expect    $1.13 a share Norbord Inc Q2 earnings: Analysts expect 9¢ a share Talisman Energy Inc Q2 earnings: Analysts expect 3¢ a share Timmins Gold Corp    Q2 earnings: Analysts expect    4¢ a share Westjet Airlines Ltd    Q2 earnings: Analysts expect    27¢ a share UNITED STATESAmgen  Q2 earnings: Analysts expect US$2.07  a share American Express Company Q2 earnings: Analysts expect US$1.39 a share Marriott International Q2 earnings: Analysts expect 67¢ a share   McGraw Hill Financial Q2 earnings: Analysts expect 98¢ a share Newmont Mining Corp.  Q2 earnings: Analysts expect 19¢ a share Pfizer Q2 earnings: Analysts expect 57¢ a share United Parcel Service, Inc. Q2 earnings: Analysts expect US$1.25 a share read more

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Anchorage centre unveils largest state rooftop solar project

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The municipality of Anchorage has unveiled the state’s largest rooftop solar project at the Egan Civic and Convention Center.Alaska Public Media reported Monday that the project is also the first effort by the municipality to operate a large rooftop solar power project.Officials say 216 solar panels are expected to power up to 9% of the convention centre’s electricity needs for the year.The $200,000 project was funded from a pool set aside for capital improvements from the Convention Center Room Tax Fund.Artic Solar Ventures CEO Stephen Trimble says the panels the company installed are expected to save the centre between $20,000 and $25,000 annually.Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz says the project is an example of the city trying something new that could add clean energy jobs.___Information from: KSKA-FM, http://www.kska.orgThe Associated Press read more

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Canadas big three telcos add nearly 200000 new wireless customers in Q2

Canada’s big three telcos add nearly 200,000 new wireless customers in Q2 by The Canadian Press Posted Aug 5, 2016 4:47 am MDT Last Updated Aug 5, 2016 at 12:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email VANCOUVER – Canada’s three telecommunications giants added nearly 200,000 new wireless customers in their most recent financial quarter, outpacing expectations.Telus Corp. (TSX:T), which reported its second-quarter earnings Friday, said it increased its net postpaid subscriber base by 61,000 customers.Rogers Communications (TSX:RCI.B) added 65,000 and BCE Inc. (TSX:BCE) gained 69,848 new postpaid subscribers during their second quarter. Both companies reported their results prior to Telus.Analysts expected more modest wireless subscriber growth this quarter.Telus president and CEO Darren Entwistle said he can’t explain the growth for the entire industry, but said it’s nice to see strong performance in the industry.Telus’s gain, in particular, “is a pretty good result overall particularly in the face of softness within the province of Alberta,” he said in a conference call with investors.He attributed some of the growth to the company’s ongoing focus on value and customer service.The company’s net profit, adjusted earnings and revenue were up from the same time last year as it attracted more customers not only to its wireless division, but also its residential Internet and Optik TV services.At the end of the quarter, Telus had 12.49 million subscriber connections to all services, up from 12.34 million a year earlier. Declines in home landline phone customers and satellite TV offset some of the gains elsewhere.The Vancouver-based company’s net income was $416 million — up 22 per cent from $341 million a year ago when Telus recorded a number of unusual items that reduced its net income.After excluding certain items such as the impact of closing the Blacks retail stores last year, adjusted earnings were up 2.2 per cent, rising to $415 million from $406 million.This year’s second-quarter profit amounted to 70 cents per Telus share, both before and after adjustments. Last year’s profit was 56 cents per share in net income and 66 cents per share in adjusted earnings.Revenue advanced 1.5 per cent to nearly $3.15 billion from $3.10 billion in the second quarter of 2015.Analysts had estimated 69 cents per share of profit and $3.19 billion in revenue, according to Thomson Reuters data. read more

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Facebook and Instagram could be hit by new laws if they do

Earlier this month the head of the NHS said “fake news” by anti-vaxers on social media had fuelled a tripling in measles cases and was risking lives.Simon Stevens said the promotion of misguided messages on Instagram and YouTube was one of the factors behind an alarming dip in vaccine coverage.Official figures show 913 cases of measles in England between January and October last year – compared with 259 in the whole of the previous year.Mr Stevens said parents who failed to get their children vaccinated were as irresponsible as if they failed to teach their children to look left and right before crossing the road. Mr Hancock later told the BBC’s Today programme: “We are looking at legislating for the duty of care that social media companies in particular have towards the people on their sites – this is an important part of that duty of care alongside all the other things that social media companies need to do, like tackling material that promotes suicide and self-harm and, of course, terrorism.” The chief executive of NHS England said parents were being given false information.“We are not being helped on this front by the fact that although nine in ten parents say they support vaccination half of them say that they have seen fake messages around vaccination on social media,” he said.Mr Stevens warned that uptake of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine is now at 87.5 percent against the 95 per cent that the World Health Organisation target, despite “unimpeachable” evidence that it saves lives.In a statement Facebook, which owns Instagram, said: “We are working to tackle vaccine misinformation…by reducing its distribution and providing people with authoritative information on the topic.” Earlier this week, crowdfunding platform GoFundMe announced it would ban anti-vaxxers from using its platform to raise money, in a bid to stop the spread of misinformation about vaccines online. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Social media firms could be hit with new laws to stop them allowing the spread of anti-vaxxers’ myths online, the Health Secretary has said.Matt Hancock said social networking sites must do more to police the spread of anti-vaccination propaganda.Speaking on BBC Breakfast, the cabinet minister suggested spreading lies about vaccines online could become illegal.Earlier this month Facebook said it would ban adverts with anti-vaccination content.And Instagram announced it would block anti-vaxxer hashtags like #vaccinesarepoison to try to stop the spread of the opinions.”This is exactly the sort of thing we should be spending our time on and talking about and, if necessary, legislating for,” Mr Hancock said.“As a country we can make decisions on these sorts of things. I want to see social media companies doing far, far more to take down this material which is so damaging.” read more

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Agnico Eagle to test LTEsupported automated underground fleet at LaRonde Zone 5

first_imgAgnico Eagle’s LaRonde Zone 5 (LZ5) full production fleet was commissioned in the third quarter of 2018 (two Sandvik trucks and one LHD). Pilot testing of automated mining using the Sandvik AutoMine system is expected to start in the fourth quarter of 2018 for both trucks and the LHD. In addition, following the successful deployment of the LTE network at LaRonde Zone 5, Agnico Eagle says it is installing a similar network at the LaRonde mine. Full coverage below level 269 is expected to be in place by the end of 2018, and the technology will be evaluated for use at LaRonde 3.In 2003, the company acquired LZ5.  The property lies adjacent to and west of the LaRonde complex and previous operators exploited the deposit by open pit. In February 2017, LZ5 was approved by Agnico Eagle’s Board of Directors for development. Commercial production was achieved on June 1, 2018. In the third quarter of 2018, mining continued at LZ5 with ore processed in July and ore stockpiled at surface in August and September as the mill processed ore from Lapa. Mining will continue at LZ5 over the balance of 2018, but in order to maximise production (tonnage and ounces), ore from LZ5 will be batch processed with ore from Lapa until the end of 2018. Currently stockpiled ore from LZ5 is expected to be processed in October and November. Productivity at LZ5 is slightly better than forecast.  Dilution and mining recovery are slightly better than anticipated while mill recovery is higher than forecast.Under the current LZ5 mine plan, a total of approximately 350,000 oz of gold are expected to be mined through 2026. The company is evaluating the potential to extend operations at depth and along strike onto the Ellison property, which adjoins LZ5 to the west. Ellison hosts an indicated mineral resource of 68,000 oz (651,000 t grading 3.25 g/t gold) as of December 31, 2017.The 100% owned LaRonde mine in northwestern Quebec achieved commercial production in 1988. Drilling is also ongoing at LaRonde 3 with a focus on mineral resource conversion to mineral reserves. The company continues to evaluate a phased approach to development between level 311 (a depth of 3.1 km) and level 350 (a depth of 3.5 km). The company is also studying the best design approaches to LaRonde 3 and the current western pyramid with consideration of potential seismic risk in the deeper portion of the mine. The company is also evaluating the potential to develop Zone 11-3, which is at depth in the past producing Bousquet 2 mine. This zone currently hosts an indicated mineral resource of approximately 126,000 oz of gold (824,800 t grading 4.76 g/t gold), and could provide additional production flexibility for the LaRonde complex.last_img read more

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Dragana Cvijic and Katarina Tomasevic to play again for Serbia

← Previous Story DKB Bundesliga: TSV Hannover Burgdorf 5 of 5! Next Story → RK Vojvodina and coach Bosko Rudic part ways The Serbian women’s national team will be much stronger in upcoming period with some old faces which haven’t been in roster for a while. After three years break (Women’s EHF EURO 2014 in Croatia and Hungary was their last event) Andrea Lekic and Sanja Damnjanovic, but also, goalkeeper Katarina Tomasevic and line-player Dragana Cvijic, are ready to play at IHF World Championship 2017 in Germany.Three of four of them (Sanja Damnjanovic is injured) are on the list for the start of Women’s EHF EURO 2018 qualification – matches against Faroe Island and Macedonia next week.These girls weren’t satisfied with work of coach Sasa Boskovic and stopped to play for the national team after debacle at EHF EURO 2014 in Osijek, where Serbia ended tournament in Preliminary Round. read more

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13 trials tribulations and triumphs of the worlds vending machines

first_img Whoops! We couldn’t find this Tweet 7. Pay it forward, just like Haley Joel Osmont Whoops! We couldn’t find this Tweet 8. A Lego vending machine, aka The Dream Source: Imgur9. Just bananas, and banana holders Source: Imgur10. Ah, drumsticks and a Twix, just what I was after Source: Imgur 11. WOAH! I just asked for a Snickers! Source: Imgur12. Truth Source: Imgur13. A vending machine that gives out random books Source: ImgurNow, here’s an otter and a vending machine. Source: Imgur9 ways to reignite that magic feeling of the last day of school>#ThisCouldBeUsButYouPlayin is the hashtag you’ve been missing out on> 1. We hear you vending machine. We hear you Source: Imgur2. Vending machine in peril Source: Imgur3. It’s always the kids that suffer in a divorce Source: Imgur4. Charity begins at the vending machine Source: Imgur5. Don’t ever change, vending machine Source: Rich Anderson6. Oh ‘Muricalast_img read more

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Heres What Happened Today Monday

first_img Monday 27 Feb 2017, 9:03 PM Bus Éireann staff will begin an indefinite strike from next Monday.The Charleton Tribunal into alleged Garda smears has officially begun.A man in his 20s has been arrested over the death of Waterford pensioner Paddy Lyons.A man in his 70s has died after being crushed by a digger at his Co Clare home.March is set to begin with sleet and snow.A man has lost a €24,000 unfair dismissal case over a last-minute “blatant lie”.Former Taoiseach Brian Cowen has joined the board of a European think tank funded by big business.The DUP’s Sammy Wilson told a US TV station that it’s ok to compare Sinn Féin with Isis.A man in his 40s died in a road accident in Galway.Publicans in rural Ireland aren’t impressed with plans to automatically ban drink drivers.Irish children aged six are getting teeth extracted under general anaesthetic.WORLD Here’s What Happened Today: Monday Bus Éireann staff to strike, and Oscargate – it’s the Fix. Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway delivering last night’s Best Picture Oscar at the Academy Awards Source: Chris Pizzello#OH OSCAR: Last night’s Academy Awards descended into farce when the wrong movie was accidentally awarded Best Picture.#WALES: The family of a child who died of an asthma attack after being turned away by a GP has called for a criminal inquiry.#TRUMP: The US president has proposed a massive $54 billion increase in US military spending.PARTING SHOTThe Crazy Frog turned 20 today. Sorry. Here he is being remixed by Axel F in 2005. Source: deputytigerfang/YouTube Get our daily news round up: 3 Comments http://jrnl.ie/3261888 Share4 Tweet Email center_img By Cianan Brennan 11,187 Views NEED TO CATCH up? TheJournal.ie brings you a round-up of today’s news.IRELAND Source: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL Feb 27th 2017, 9:03 PM last_img read more

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Le colibri fait la cour grâce à ses plumes

first_imgLe colibri fait la cour grâce à ses plumesC’est grâce aux plumes de sa queue que le colibri émet sa sérénade. Le chant de cour de l’oiseau-mouche est en effet produit par le passage du vent entre ses plumes. Une découverte réalisée par des chercheurs de l’université américaine de Yale.Comme de nombreux oiseaux, le colibri courtise les femelles en chantant. Le secret du son émis par le petit oiseau lors de sa parade nuptiale a été étudié par une équipe de chercheurs de Yale, qui publient les conclusions de leurs recherches dans la revue Science. Ils révèlent alors que le chant de cour de l’oiseau-mouche est produit d’une manière particulière : grâce au passage du vent dans les plumes de sa queue. Comme l’explique Christopher Clark, le principal auteur de l’étude, les recherches ont porté sur les plumes des queues de quatorze espèces de colibris, placées dans une soufflerie. Pour étudier les sons émis, ils se sont alors servis d’un laser doppler vibromètre habituellement utilisé pour mesurer les vibrations d’une surface. Ils ont ainsi remarqué que lorsque les vents étaient aussi rapides que la vitesse en plongée des colibris, les plumes vibraient en rythmique, produisant alors un cri. A chaque espèce, un chant unique Les chercheurs ont en outre noté que chacun des mâles des différentes espèces d’oiseaux-mouches émet un chant unique. Les plumes vibrent selon différentes fréquences, et les sons qu’elles produisent forment une harmonie qui permet à l’oiseau d’émettre une symphonie entière indépendante de ses cris habituels et du fameux bourdonnement produit par ses ailes. Les plumes voisines peuvent elles aussi vibrer à des fréquences différentes, et ainsi engendrer deux tonalités, tandis que certains colibris ajoutent à ces deux sons un autre chant, cette fois émis de façon plus traditionnelle, avec leurs cordes vocales.Pour Christopher Clark, cette étude tend à prouver que “la diversité des structures de plumes des colibris peut résulter de la sélection sexuelle”. La subtilité du chant de cour des mâles serait ainsi un critère déterminant dans le choix des femelles colibris.Le 17 septembre 2011 à 14:46 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Johnson and Johnson rolls out global parental benefits to 60 countries

first_imgPharmaceutical organisation Johnson and Johnson has rolled out a global parental leave benefit to 60 of its operating locations in order to improve its maternity, paternity and adoption provision.From 1 August 2017, the organisation rolled out enhanced parental leave in 60 countries including the UK, Malaysia, China, Australia, Belgium, Mexico, India, South Korea, New Zealand and Kenya.It introduced the first of its global parental leave arrangements in the US in 2015. The organisation’s Brazil site brought the policies into effect from May 2017, while Argentina introduced the benefits from June 2017.Between September 2017 and January 2018, Johnson and Johnson will roll out the enhanced parental leave benefits in Kazakhstan, Belarus, Georgia, Armenia, Switzrland, Israel, Russia and Germany.Under the terms of its enhanced policy, all new parents will be entitled to a minimum of eight weeks fully paid maternity, paternity or adoption leave where more extensive provision did not previously exist.For example, in Malaysia, the organisation has increased fully paid maternity leave, giving staff an additional 5.2 weeks on full pay on top of the existing six week recovery period and 2.8 weeks maternity leave. It has also extended paternity leave two days to eight weeks on full pay and introduced introduced eight weeks fully paid adoption leave, for which no previous provision was in place.The enhanced parental leave forms part of a wider global family-friendly benefits package, which includes temperature controlled breast milk delivery for nursing mothers travelling for business purposes and on-site childcare centres. In addition, US employees can access financial benefits to help with the costs associated with having a family. This includes a $35,000 (£27,342) benefit to contribute towards fertility treatments, a $20,000 (£15,624) benefit to help families adopt a child under the age of 18, and a $20,000 reimbursement per child for eligible services related to surrogacy. Speech, occupational, and physical therapy, as well as applied behaviourial analysis, is also covered for US employees.Peter Fasolo, executive vice president, chief human resources officer at Johnson and Johnson, said: “At Johnson and Johnson, we are making long-term investments in our employees, prioritising flexibility, fostering growth and sustained engagement, while meeting the needs of working families. We are proud to continually lead the way in providing progressive benefits to our employees, which in turn, creates healthier families and communities across the world.”last_img read more

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Wilmington Community Fund Wants To Help Federal Employees In Town Affected By

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Are you a federal employee affected by the government shutdown? The Wilmington Community Fund is here to help.If you’re a Wilmington resident and you have worries about a temporary work stoppage and how it may affect you, the Community Fund asks that you contact their organization.Depending on your situation, the Community Fund has many ways it can help meet your needs and hopefully relieve a little stress during a difficult time.The Community Fund offers a Food Pantry and Emergency Relief Assistance. Check its website for further information. Email inquiries are welcomed at wilmcf@verizon.net.(NOTE: The above announcement is from the Wilmington Community Fund.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedCOMING SOON: Town Shredding Day Set For September 14, Will Benefit Wilmington Food PantryIn “Community”Wilmington Community Fund Giving Away Reusable Tote Bags On June 23In “Community”Town Shredding Day Set For September 14, Will Benefit Wilmington Food PantryIn “Community”last_img read more

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Name Of Helicopter Pilot Killed In Crash Released

first_imgAnchorage police have released the name of the pilot of a helicopter that crashed at the Birchwood Airport in Chugiak.Police say the pilot was 62-year-old Thomas Moore of Anchorage.Moore was flying a Robinson R-44 Wednesday afternoon when the aircraft crashed and became engulfed in flames. A bystander was taken to a hospital for treatment of burns sustained while he was trying to rescue Moore.The bystander’s name has not been released.The cause of the crash is under investigation.last_img

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Head wound suggests ancient Aborigine was killed by a boomerang

first_imgAustralian Aboriginal boomerangs. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 1.0 The skeleton was discovered in 2014 by an Aboriginal man living in the area—the locals subsequently named it Kaakutja, which means “older brother” in the Baakantji language. It was initially believed that the skeleton had belonged to a man that had been killed by someone with the British Native Police, a group that was responsible for killing many Aborigine people not long after Europeans arrived in Australia in the 1800s. But testing by the researchers showed that the man died in the 1200s, well before Europeans arrived with their metal weapons.Analysis of the skeleton revealed a large cut to the face that had gashed the bone running from the brow to the chin that had not healed, suggesting it was part of the reason for the man’s death. They also found that two of the man’s ribs had been broken and that part of his arm had been cut off. They also noted the skull had two healed wounds, suggesting that the man had been involved in more than one violent encounter. But it was the head wound the team found most intriguing because it looked so much like a wound typically caused by a metal weapon.To better understand what may have caused the head wound, the researchers studied paintings that had been done on rocks in the vicinity, which had been dated to around the same time as the skeleton—they noted that the paintings depicted people wielding Lil-lis, a type of knife-like wooden weapon, and boomerangs. The team noted that either type of weapon could have been used to inflict such a long wound, but suggest that the boomerang seemed more likely because there were no wounds to the forearms, which typically occur in hand-to-hand combat. A tossed boomerang would have taken an arced path toward its victim, allowing for slipping behind a shield if the victim had been holding one. (Phys.org)—A team led by Michael Westaway, an anthropologist with Australia’s Griffith University, has found evidence that suggests a skeleton found protruding from an Australian riverbank two years ago is the remains of an ancient Aborigine man who died of what might have been a strike by a boomerang. In their paper published in the Cambridge Press’s, Antiquity, the group describes the skeleton, what they found during their analysis and why they believe it might represent the victim of a boomerang attack. Journal information: Antiquity 2,000-year-old skeleton found at Mediterranean shipwreck © 2016 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: Michael Westaway et al. The death of Kaakutja: a case of peri-mortem weapon trauma in an Aboriginal man from north-western New South Wales, Australia, Antiquity (2016). DOI: 10.15184/aqy.2016.173AbstractSkeletal remains from a burial in New South Wales exhibit evidence of fatal trauma, of a kind normally indicative of sharp metal weapons, yet the burial dates to the mid thirteenth century—600 years before European settlers reached the area. Could sharp-edged wooden weapons from traditional Aboriginal culture inflict injuries similar to those resulting from later, metal blades? Analysis indicates that the wooden weapons known as ‘Lil-lils’ and the fighting boomerangs (‘Wonna’) both have blades that could fit within the dimensions of the major trauma and are capable of having caused the fatal wounds. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Head wound suggests ancient Aborigine was killed by a boomerang (2016, September 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-09-wound-ancient-aborigine-boomerang.htmllast_img read more

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VIDEO The Consolidation Trend in Radiology Business

first_img Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more SCCT news and videos Consolidation in Radiology Business – RSNA 2016Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 12:10Loaded: 1.36%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -12:10 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Conference Coverage View all 396 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Women’s Health View all 62 items SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.”center_img Videos | Radiology Business | December 23, 2016 VIDEO: The Consolidation Trend in Radiology Business Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Information Technology View all 220 items Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  A discussion with Andy Colbert, managing director and founding member of Ziegler’s Healthcare Investment Banking practice, on the reasons for and strategy involved in the business trend of radiology practice consolidation. He spoke to ITN at RSNA 2016. Read the blog “Risk Abatement May Determine the Future of Radiology,” and the article “Opportunities for Growth in a Competitive Radiology Climate.” Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floorlast_img read more

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Cubas aging population will test economic reform

first_img The vital role family plays in society “We must be perfectly clear that the aging of the populace no longer has a solution,” Castro’s economic czar, Marino Murillo, told lawmakers in an alarmed tone last month. “It is going to happen, and that cannot be changed in the short term. … Society must prepare itself.”The aging of Cuba’s population has its roots in some of the core achievements of Fidel Castro’s revolution, including a universal health care system that has increased life expectancy from 69 years during the 1960s to 78 today, comparable with the United States.Abortions are free and it is estimated that half of Cuban pregnancies are terminated. High university graduation rates, generally associated worldwide with low fertility numbers, have Cuban women averaging 1.5 children, below the rate of replacement.Cuba’s National Office of Statistics says about 2 million of the island’s 11 million inhabitants, or 17 percent, were over 60 years old last year. That’s already high compared to Latin America as a whole, where the rate is somewhere north of 9 percent, extrapolating from U.N. figures from 2000.That U.N. study shows Cuba’s population is aging even faster than that of China, which has forbidden couples to have more than one child. Cuba’s rate would be typical in a wealthy European nation. But Cuba lacks the wealth to cope with it. 4 must play golf courses in Arizona 0 Comments   Share   More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements (Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Aging populations present difficulties for countries around the world, and attempts to spur birth rates have produced meager returns, Diaz-Briquets said.But he suggested that if Castro’s reforms can create more opportunities for private enterprise, Cuba might be able to woo immigrants from countries where extreme poverty is rampant and homicides are skyrocketing, places where the Communist-run island’s free health care and relative public safety might seem a good alternative.“The situation in Haiti and some Central American nations will continue to be even worse than in Cuba,” Diaz-Briquets said, adding that a post-U.S.-embargo Cuba could be even more attractive to potential migrants from those countries. “The way things are going, and assuming some more positive scenarios for Cuba, the idea doesn’t seem that outlandish.”___Andrea Rodriguez on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ARodriguezAP Research shows emigrants are increasingly women of child-bearing age, which compounds the problem, according to Alberta Duran, who was among the first to examine the aging trend before retiring from her post at a Cuban sociological research institute.“The aging population has been turning into Cuba’s biggest demographic problem since the 1990s,” Duran said.By 2021, more Cubans will be leaving the workforce than entering, according to government projections.The contracting labor pool presents a challenge for Cuba’s goal of making the country more productive and efficient without abandoning its policy of providing for everyone’s basic needs. Officials aim to eliminate 1 million redundant government jobs and grow a non-state sector that, it is hoped, will account for 40 percent of economic activity compared with about 15 percent today.“Reform becomes more difficult due to emigration,” said Sergio Diaz-Briquets, a Washington-based expert on Cuban demographics. “Those who leave are the youngest, best-educated and most ambitious.”And with the ranks of seniors increasing, Diaz-Briquets said, resources that could be used to stimulate the economic project inevitably will have to be diverted to care for the elderly. Sponsored Stories Demographers agree that Cuba’s population has topped out around 11.2 million, and negative growth will be the rule for the forseeable future.Murillo, the economic czar, said authorities are studying measures for next year to try to stimulate fertility rates, but he did not give details.“We are going to have a serious problem with the availability of a labor force,” Murillo acknowledged.In recent years Cuba has implemented a number of measures for the aging, including an expanded denture distribution program and establishing “grandparents’ circles” of elderly citizens who get together for activities and help each other out when the relatives they live with are at work.Authorities recently asked seniors to keep active later in life by rolling the retirement age progressively back from 55 to 60 for women and from 60 to 65 for men. Raul Castro himself is already 16 years past his golden-watch moment, at 81.Cuba recently allowed retirees to return to work and still collect their pensions. They’re also being encouraged to join the class of small-business owners setting up shop under Castro’s reforms, though experts say that idea has limited potential. Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family Top Stories The trend is accelerating, with the number of seniors projected to nearly double to 3.6 million, or a third of the population, by 2035. During the same period, working-age Cubans are expected to decline from 65 percent to 52 percent.The future may look a lot like Emelia Moreno. Still vigorous at 75 years old, she lives alone in a small apartment in Central Havana and spends much of her time at a neighborhood senior center that provides 1,000 retirees with medical attention, meals and social activities such as singing and dance classes.“Cuba is fighting so that people of a certain age don’t feel too bad,” she said.But her only child left for the U.S. a decade ago, and she knows that one day she’ll be completely dependent on the government because she has no family to take care of her when she cannot.“I had heard people talk about how they felt empty when a family member left, but I had no idea,” Moreno said, caressing a photo of her daughter, Yeniset.The graying trend can be traced partly to the country’s weak economy, resulting in the loss of people such as Yeniset, an outflow of 35,000 per year as people seek opportunity in the United States and elsewhere. New high school in Mesa lets students pick career paths Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates Associated PressHAVANA (AP) – The scene at Havana’s Victor Hugo Park is unfortunately typical, with a handful of boys kicking a soccer ball through trees while dozens of gray-haired seniors bend and stretch to the urgings of a government-employed trainer.So few children, so many elderly. It’s a central dilemma for a nation whose population is the oldest in Latin America, and getting older.The labor force soon will be shrinking as health costs soar, just when President Raul Castro’s government is struggling to implement reforms that aim to resuscitate an economy long on life support. Top holiday drink recipeslast_img read more

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You might also be interested in

first_img You might also be interested in PRESS RELEASETampa, Florida – IFCO, the world’s leading supplier of Reusable Plastic Containers for fresh food packaging, today announced the appointment of Jon Heyler as Vice President, Operations, for IFCO North America.“I am pleased Jon has agreed to rejoin the IFCO team,” said Dan Martin, President of IFCO North America. “A strong commitment to food safety and a culture of constant improvement are two of IFCO’s core operating principles, and Jon will provide the leadership, vision and superior execution we need to serve our customers, and their consumers, faster, better and more completely than ever before.”Jon will lead IFCO’s strategic operations effort in the United States and Canada, focusing on wash operations improvement, asset management and transportation.“I am proud to return to IFCO,” said Mr. Heyler. “The company has developed a strong reputation for developing and implementing fresh food packaging solutions that increase food safety, sustainability and operational efficiency, while reducing costs for growers and retailers. That is something special and something I want to be a part of once again.”Jon has more than two decades of experience in supply chain management. He served as IFCO Vice President, East Area, from 2009 to 2013. For the past two years, he served as Chief Operating Officer of Pooling Provider, Hoover Ferguson Group, a former Brambles joint venture. He has served in numerous leadership roles in operations, logistics, transportation and general management during his career. He also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from the University of Vermont.Jon assumed his new role September 4th. He is based at IFCO headquarters in Tampa, Florida, and will report directly to Dan Martin. October 29 , 2018 center_img Brambles to sell IFCO RPC business for US$2.5B …last_img read more

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first_img Want to be in the luxury travel know? Subscribe to our free eNewsletter here to keep up to date with everything in the luxury travel industry. Virgin Australia and Virgin Atlantic have filed plans for a proposed partnership on services between Australia and the UK and Ireland, via Hong Kong and Los Angeles. The alliance has the scope to include new routes, frequencies and capacity upgauges.The Proposed Cooperation aims to improve Virgin Australia’s passenger feed on flights to Hong Kong (which launched from Melbourne in July 2017 and Sydney in July 2018), and its loads between Australia and Los Angeles. It comes after Virgin Australia’s codeshare partner, Hong Kong Airlines, dropped its Australian operation in October 2018 due to poor performance, and abandoned its New Zealand services last month.Virgin Australia and Virgin Atlantic are currently codeshare partners and offer reciprocal frequent flyer benefits. The new venture relates to inventory management, sales and marketing, scheduling, network and capacity decisions, pricing, product, operations and  procurement, in addition to an extension of their existing frequent flyer agreements.Under the Heads of Agreement filled with the Australian Government last week, the Virgin branded airlines have sought approval for a long term cooperation agreement to better compete against the likes of Qantas and Cathay Pacific.They told the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) that under the alliance they will create “more competitive connecting international services” with a “compelling Virgin-to-Virgin brand proposition”.“The Applicants will better utilise each carrier’s home market strength, implement improved pricing and inventory management strategies and optimise their airport operations in Hong Kong and Los Angeles,” they said. In their application, the airlines said the cooperation would assist Virgin Australia to “more sustainably operate its Australia-Hong Kong services in competition with Qantas and Cathay Pacific”.They said those “dominant carriers” enjoy load factors on their flights to Hong Kong of over 80%, and share over 90% of the market, compared to Virgin Australia’s loads of “around 66%” and less than 10% of traffic.Currently, Virgin Australia and Virgin Atlantic’s market share on the Australia to UK/Ireland route is less than a combined 3%. That’s compared to the powerhouse alliance of Qantas and Emirates which gobbles up 40% of the market under their long term alliance.Among the benefits of the VA/VS partnership is competitive joint pricing, product enhancements, improved schedules and reduced connection times and increase in competition between Australia and the UK/Ireland.Should the Proposed Cooperation be authorised, the carriers plan to enable codesharing between flights:Virgin Atlantic plans to codeshare on flights operated between Australia and New Zealand by Virgin Australia;Virgin Australia will codeshare on VS’s operated flights from London Heathrow to other cities in the UK and Ireland;and in the future, Virgin Australia will codeshare on Virgin Atlantic flights from other connecting points in the US and UK/Ireland on itineraries that include a VA flight from Australia.If approved, the carriers also said they may co-locate airport lounge and facilities at Los Angeles International Airport in the future.Virgin Australia and Virgin Atlantic are seeking interim authorisation by 21 June to initiate the partnership ahead of a draft determination by the ACCC in September this year. A final decision is expected to be handed down in November. Go back to the e-newsletter Go back to the e-newsletterlast_img read more

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