Neutron star field decay could impact what we know

first_img Explore further And the implications of field decay? Link points out that since most neutron star ages are estimated assuming that a star’s magnetic field is constant, field decay would change estimates of neutron star ages. “If field decay takes place over about a million years, as our analysis indicates, then what we thought was a 10 million year old star may only be 2 million years old. If we’re getting the ages wrong for some stars, our whole picture of neutron star evolution should be reconsidered.” Age determinations are not the only thing that could change in the face of magnetic field decay. “These large field neutron stars are different from other neutron stars,” Link says. “It could be that magnetic fields in ordinary, lower-field, neutron stars decay little or not at all, due to the way the field was established at the stars’ births. More research is needed to consider the possibilities.” “We’ve opened a new can of worms,” Link continues. “There’s a lot more to be understood about how neutron star thermal and magnetic evolution proceeds. I hope we’ve opened up new lines of discussion and new areas of research that will eventually further our understanding of neutron star cooling and composition.” You can learn more about Bennett Link’s work by visiting www.physics.montana.edu/people … ?id_PersonDetails=15 .Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Neutron star field decay could impact what we know (2007, February 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-02-neutron-star-field-impact.html Until now, explains Link, a professor of physics at Montana State University in Bozeman, all evidence indicated that neutron star magnetic fields last essentially forever, except in very strongly-magnetized stars — magnetars — which have magnetic fields in excess of 1014 G. Link and his colleagues, José Pons, Juan Miralles and Ulrich Geppert from the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Alacant in Alacant, Spain present the findings from their study of about 30 neutron stars in a Letter published in Physical Review Letters. Their observations, and the conclusions drawn from them can be found in “Evidence for Heating of Neutron Stars by Magnetic-Field Decay.” The major finding from the team’s work is that stars with fields in excess of about 1012 G show evidence for decay of their magnetic fields. Previously, such stars were assumed to have constant magnetic fields like stars with weaker fields. “Our work fills the gap between the lower-field stars and the magnetars,” Link says. As the energy of the field dissipates into space, the cooling of these more strongly magnetized stars is delayed. A neutron star is a super-dense stellar remnant created from a supernova explosion. More mass than is contained in the Sun is packed into an object 20 km across. One reason these objects are so interesting is because they contain matter denser than anything we can study on Earth. “You can only study the properties of dense matter to a certain point in the laboratory,” Link explains. “But if you could figure out what’s going on in a neutron star, then you could learn more about how some of the more exotic particles that you get in particle accelerator experiments, like pions, hyperons and quarks, interact.” “One way to approach this problem is to look at how neutron stars lose their residual heat as they age. What we have found could have profound impacts on our understanding of how neutron stars cool, how old they are and even what they are made of,” Link says. It appears that only about five percent of neutron stars, the most strongly magnetized, undergo significant field decay; this may be why previous studies, which considered the entire neutron star population, missed the effect. Link expects that expanding the study to more stars will support the work presented by him and his colleagues in Spain. However, he points out, “expanding the sample will have to await the next generation of x-ray observatories.” The trend of neutron star temperature (in kilo-electron volts) versus magnetic field strength for different strongly-magnetized neutron stars. The research group interprets the general increase of temperature with field strength as strong evidence that a star´s temperature is controlled by heat from the magnetic field after a certain age. The solid line shows a prediction assuming that cooling bysurface emission is balanced by heating from the magnetic field. The position of the line implies an average decay time of about one million years. The diamonds and stars represent magnetars. Red symbols indicate stars younger than about 104 years which have not yet had time to cool down onto the solid line. Vertical lines represent uncertainty ranges, vertical arrows denote upper limits, and horizontal arrows denote upper limits on the field. Credit: Bennett Linkcenter_img “[W]hat we have found could have profound impacts on what we know about how neutron stars evolve, how old they are and even what they are made of,” Bennett Link tells PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Russia launches space telescopelast_img read more

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Study shows Australian jack jumper ants navigate using landmarks

first_img Citation: Study shows Australian jack jumper ants navigate using landmarks (2013, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-australian-jack-jumper-ants-landmarks.html (Phys.org) —A trio of researchers from The Australian National University has found that solitary foraging jack jumper ants take mental snapshots of the terrain as they move around. This allows the ants, the team notes in their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, to find their way home using landmark identification. More information: Mapping the navigational knowledge of individually foraging ants, Myrmecia croslandi, Published 26 June 2013 doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.0683AbstractAnts are efficient navigators, guided by path integration and visual landmarks. Path integration is the primary strategy in landmark-poor habitats, but landmarks are readily used when available. The landmark panorama provides reliable information about heading direction, routes and specific location. Visual memories for guidance are often acquired along routes or near to significant places. Over what area can such locally acquired memories provide information for reaching a place? This question is unusually approachable in the solitary foraging Australian jack jumper ant, since individual foragers typically travel to one or two nest-specific foraging trees. We find that within 10 m from the nest, ants both with and without home vector information available from path integration return directly to the nest from all compass directions, after briefly scanning the panorama. By reconstructing panoramic views within the successful homing range, we show that in the open woodland habitat of these ants, snapshot memories acquired close to the nest provide sufficient navigational information to determine nest-directed heading direction over a surprisingly large area, including areas that animals may have not visited previously. Explore further Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Sugar ants ‘know when they’re lost’ Ants are known to use various methods to find their way home after foraging, most notably path integration. This is where ants record distance traveled and in what direction as they march around and then use that information to help them find their way home. In this new effort, the researchers found that when foraging relatively close to home, jack jumper ants also note landmarks as they travel that they can use to create a mental map that leads back to their nest.In a prior study carried out by researchers at Australia’s Vision Centre, it was found that bull ants had more difficulty finding their way home in the dark than in the light of day. This suggested they use landmarks as navigation aids. Building on these findings, the researchers in this new study collected 50 jack jumper ants and moved them various distances from the nest, then watched (using differential GPS) to see if they could find their way home. The group found that at distances of 10 meters or less, the ants were able to look around them then head straight for home. In contrast, when the researchers carried the ants 100 meters from their nest, the ants were confused and attempted to use path integration to orient themselves.These findings suggested the ants were using landmarks to find their way home. To add credence to their theory, the team used cameras to study the terrain in which the ants had been released; these cameras allowed the researchers to look around from the vantage point of the ants. Doing so allowed them to very clearly see that various landmarks provided the ants sufficient information to guide their trip home. As the distance from the nest was increased, however, the team found it more and more difficult to use landmark information to create a return map.Based on their observations, the researchers conclude that the ants do indeed use landmarks as a form of navigational aid. They note also that this simple ability far outstrips the abilities of current robots, thus jack jumper ants may serve as a model for robot builders looking to improve navigational skills in their creations. © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Research team develops acoustic topological insulator idea to allow for hiding from

first_img Citation: Research team develops acoustic topological insulator idea to allow for hiding from sonar (2015, March 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-team-acoustic-topological-insulator-idea.html , arXiv Around the bend. An acoustic topological insulator would guide sound waves around its edges, as shown in this simulation. Credit: Z. Yang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2015) Explore further (Phys.org)—A team of researchers working in Singapore has come up with what they believe is a way to apply a topologic insulator to an object to prevent sound waves from being bounced back and detected by a source. They have published their work in the journal Physical Review Letters. Have researchers discovered the sound of the stars? Journal information: Physical Review Letters © 2015 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientists have developed ways to coat materials with other materials to causes electric current to remain on the surface, preventing damage to sensitive parts inside—such coatings are called topological insulators and are generally based on causing less scattering and creating a band gap. In this new effort, the research team has expanded on that idea to bring a similar result for insulating objects from sound waves.To make a topological insulator work against sonar would involve creating a coating or cover that could cause sound waves to propagate around an object (instead of scattering) rather than allowing them to be bounced back to a receiver. To make that happen, the researchers envision a cover made up of a lattice of spinning metal cylinders, each of which would be surrounded by a bit of fluid which would itself be contained within an acoustically transparent shell. The same fluid would be used to fill the spaces between the cylinders, but it would not move. Because of the spinning movement inside, a vortex would be created in the fluid that surrounds the cylinders. In this setup, sound waves would not be able to move through the center of the structure due to a periodic pattern that would produce a sonic band gap—but the rotating fluid around the center would allow for causing propagation to occur in a predefined direction—the edge states, the team notes, could guide sound waves with high precision. A submarine covered with such an insulator would be invisible to sonar because sound waves sent in its direction would be routed in a direction away from where they came from, preventing them from bouncing back to the source.The work thus far by the team is purely theoretical, but they suggest there is no reason to believe it would not work in practice. The most difficult part they note, would be dealing with irregular “bumps” on a surface, which could throw off the propagation if not handled properly. More information: Topological Acoustics, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 114301 – Published 20 March 2015 . dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.114301 . On Arxiv: arxiv.org/abs/1411.7100ABSTRACTThe manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as “topological edge states,” has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.last_img read more

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Head wound suggests ancient Aborigine was killed by a boomerang

first_imgAustralian Aboriginal boomerangs. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 1.0 The skeleton was discovered in 2014 by an Aboriginal man living in the area—the locals subsequently named it Kaakutja, which means “older brother” in the Baakantji language. It was initially believed that the skeleton had belonged to a man that had been killed by someone with the British Native Police, a group that was responsible for killing many Aborigine people not long after Europeans arrived in Australia in the 1800s. But testing by the researchers showed that the man died in the 1200s, well before Europeans arrived with their metal weapons.Analysis of the skeleton revealed a large cut to the face that had gashed the bone running from the brow to the chin that had not healed, suggesting it was part of the reason for the man’s death. They also found that two of the man’s ribs had been broken and that part of his arm had been cut off. They also noted the skull had two healed wounds, suggesting that the man had been involved in more than one violent encounter. But it was the head wound the team found most intriguing because it looked so much like a wound typically caused by a metal weapon.To better understand what may have caused the head wound, the researchers studied paintings that had been done on rocks in the vicinity, which had been dated to around the same time as the skeleton—they noted that the paintings depicted people wielding Lil-lis, a type of knife-like wooden weapon, and boomerangs. The team noted that either type of weapon could have been used to inflict such a long wound, but suggest that the boomerang seemed more likely because there were no wounds to the forearms, which typically occur in hand-to-hand combat. A tossed boomerang would have taken an arced path toward its victim, allowing for slipping behind a shield if the victim had been holding one. (Phys.org)—A team led by Michael Westaway, an anthropologist with Australia’s Griffith University, has found evidence that suggests a skeleton found protruding from an Australian riverbank two years ago is the remains of an ancient Aborigine man who died of what might have been a strike by a boomerang. In their paper published in the Cambridge Press’s, Antiquity, the group describes the skeleton, what they found during their analysis and why they believe it might represent the victim of a boomerang attack. Journal information: Antiquity 2,000-year-old skeleton found at Mediterranean shipwreck © 2016 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: Michael Westaway et al. The death of Kaakutja: a case of peri-mortem weapon trauma in an Aboriginal man from north-western New South Wales, Australia, Antiquity (2016). DOI: 10.15184/aqy.2016.173AbstractSkeletal remains from a burial in New South Wales exhibit evidence of fatal trauma, of a kind normally indicative of sharp metal weapons, yet the burial dates to the mid thirteenth century—600 years before European settlers reached the area. Could sharp-edged wooden weapons from traditional Aboriginal culture inflict injuries similar to those resulting from later, metal blades? Analysis indicates that the wooden weapons known as ‘Lil-lils’ and the fighting boomerangs (‘Wonna’) both have blades that could fit within the dimensions of the major trauma and are capable of having caused the fatal wounds. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Head wound suggests ancient Aborigine was killed by a boomerang (2016, September 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-09-wound-ancient-aborigine-boomerang.htmllast_img read more

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Skull fragments with carved long deliberate lines found at Gobekli Tepe

first_img Explore further Frontal bone fragment of skull 3 with carvings (1) and cut marks (2,3). Credit: Julia Gresky, Juliane Haelm, DAI. Schematic drawings of Göbekli Tepe skulls. Gray, preserved elements; red, modifications. Credit: Julia Gresky, Juliane Haelm, DAI. Aerial view of Göbekli Tepe. Credit: German Archaeological Institute (DAI) Skull fragments with cut marks. Credit: German Archaeological Institute Schematic drawings of Göbekli Tepe skulls. Gray, preserved elements; red, modifications. Credit: Julia Gresky, Juliane Haelm, DAI. A pillar from Building D at Göbekli Tepe seen from the southeast. Credit: German Archaeological Institute (DAI) Journal information: Science Advances Citation: Skull fragments with carved long, deliberate lines found at Gobekli Tepe (2017, June 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-06-skull-fragments-deliberate-lines-gobekli.html Aerial view of Göbekli Tepe. Credit: German Archaeological Institute (DAI) © 2017 Phys.org Anthropomorphic depictions from Göbekli Tepe. (A) Intentionally decapitated human statue (height, 60 cm). Credit: Nico Becker, Göbekli Tepe Archive, DAI. (B) The gift bearer holds in his hands a human head (height, 26 cm). (C) Pillar 43 (building D) with low relief of an ithyphallic headless individual, one arm raised (bottom right). Credit: Dieter Johannes and Klaus Schmidt, Göbekli Tepe Archive, DAI Göbekli Tepe is the name given to an ancient temple in what is now southern Turkey—it was built approximately 11,000 years ago, during the Stone Age. Workers have been at the site for the past 20 years removing the soil covering the tall pieces of T-shaped limestone, some of which rise up to 18 feet from the ground. Thus far, researchers at the site report that it does not appear that the temple was used as living quarters, but was instead a temple where the locals gathered to perform rituals. One such ritual appears to have involved using human skulls—hundreds of them, broken into pieces, litter the areas between the limestone columns. These findings have caused researchers to label the site as evidence of one of the earliest skull cults. In this new effort, the researchers report that some of the skull pieces have been found to have lines cut into them.The team determined that the skull fragments they found with the unique marks on them belonged to just three individuals—each had deep straight-line grooves carved into the bone and one of them also had a hole drilled through its top. The grooves were found to measure between 0.2 and 4 millimeters deep and were clearly made by a person using stone tools, rather than by another animal or other natural process. Also, it was determined that the grooves were made after the person had died—there was no bone growth suggesting natural repair. Also, it appeared likely that the grooves had been made shortly after the person had died, while the bone was still relatively elastic. Details of artificial skull modifications. A, C, D: carvings, B: drilled perforation. Credit:Julia Gresky, DAI (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the German Archaeological Institute has found long, deliberate marks carved into ancient skulls found at the Göbekli Tepe dig site. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes the skull fragments they have been studying and offer some possible explanations for the markings they found. More information: Modified human crania from Göbekli Tepe provide evidence for a new form of Neolithic skull cult Science Advances  28 Jun 2017: Vol. 3, no. 6, e1700564, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700564AbstractArchaeological excavations at Göbekli Tepe, a transitional Neolithic site in southeast Turkey, have revealed the earliest megalithic ritual architecture with characteristic T-shaped pillars. Although human burials are still absent from the site, a number of fragmented human bones have been recovered from fill deposits of buildings and from adjacent areas. We focus on three partially preserved human skulls, all of which carry artificial modifications of a type so far unknown from contemporaneous sites and the ethnographic record. As such, modified skull fragments from Göbekli Tepe could indicate a new, previously undocumented variation of skull cult in the Early Neolithic of Anatolia and the Levant. Because it is not clear why the grooves appeared only on three skulls, the researchers were left to generate theories—they believe one of the likeliest possibilities is that the grooves were made to hold cords in place while the skull was hoisted onto a pole using the drilled hole—possibly as a way to scare off enemies. Ancient stone pillars offer clues of comet strike that changed human history This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Shed the flab but in style

first_imgThe idea for this book was conceived in her mind several years ago when she first started her practice as a ‘wellness specialist’. ‘Three out of five of my clients were from the corporate arena and it saddened me to see intelligent minds being bogged down by excess weight and medical concerns, failing to reach their full potential,’ said Jain.At times we all feel stressed, exhausted and a sudden dip in energy levels, but all of these symptoms are the effects of odd work timings and unhealthy eating habits. Also, it increases chances of acquiring heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and breathing problems. Jain’s book offers simple solutions to combat stress and anxiety like, sleeping it off, ditching drastic meals, quitting smoking among others. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘Being a working woman, I fully understand the pitfalls of the workplace. The book will help the reader to be back on the road to good health and improved productivity with tips like eating meals at regular time, carrying a healthy snack, listening to relaxing music or going for a walk to bust stress,’ she added.Now, how can we forget about the sleepless nights we spend fretting about the work deadline, household chores or simply not being able to catch a wink. Many people suffer from disturbed sleep due to job stress, shift timings at work or jet lag. This makes them high-strung and edgy and affects their day-to-day routines and functions. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAccording to Jain the remedies are simple. ‘A warm bath, a milky drink, the right temperature in your room, a light massage … are perfect ingredients for a good night’s sleep.’For that looking good part, there’s only one answer, exercise. Jain said, ‘Exercise, besides being a great stress buster, also expends surplus energy and also induce sleep. People should not indulge in sedentary lifestyles but should be indulged in some kind of physical work out.’For the one’s who can not control themselves when there is food in front of them she simply advice’s ‘If your weight gain is driving you to stay off every kind of indulgence, stop. Allow yourself a tiny treat once in a while,’ she said.‘Don’t go for that whole bar of chocolate; settle for a square or two. It will make you happier without taking you away from your weight loss target,’ Jain quips.last_img read more

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I hate producing films Abhishek Bachchan

first_imgActor Abhishek Bachchan, who tasted success as a producer with the National Award winning film Paa, says he’s not a huge fan of producing movies. However, he’s okay with the job as long as he isn’t acting in the project as well.‘I hate producing films. It’s just that I got lucky (with Paa). But I hate it,’ Abhishek, who played a reel father to his real father Amitabh Bachchan in the 2009 movie, said.‘During Paa, I had a very difficult time because the producer in me came in the way of the actor in me. I would be more comfortable in producing a film without me acting in it. If I have to produce a film in which I am acting, that would need a lot of preparation and organisation from my part,’ he added. Also Read – A fresh blend of fameAbhishek’s next as a producer is Shamitabh, which again stars his megastar father. ‘Shamitabh is more enjoyable because I am just the producer in that. Production is a very difficult job and it’s a very thankless job,’ said the 38-year-old.Being directed by R. Balakrishnan aka R. Balki, the movie also stars Dhanush and Akshara Haasan.Paa was also directed by R. Balki, and Abhishek says the doors of his home production AB Corp will always remain open for the acclaimed filmmaker. ‘He means a lot to me as a director, and helped me restart my production house with Paa. He made me into a producer by making ‘Paa’,’ he said. Also Read – Martin Freeman confirms ‘Black Panther’ returnProduction apart, Abhishek is all excited about his big screen appearance in Farah Khan’s Happy New Year, which releases 24 Oct – just a day after Diwali. Abhishek Bachchan, who has donned a ‘tapori’ look for his role as Nandu Bhide in Happy New Year, says the character had to be created from scratch as he bears no resemblance to the actor’s real self.Talking about his character in the film, he said: ‘I play Nandu Bhide from Sangam Chawl in Mumbai. He enjoys his drink a bit too much and that makes him very entertaining and very outrageous, but a lot of fun.‘Nandu is completely opposite of what I am in real life. There was nothing I could use of myself in Nandu. He is somebody that director Farah Khan and I have literally created from scratch.last_img read more

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Disciples and the Guru

first_imgSamyukta, a special duet by two senior disciples of (Padmashri) Geeta Chandran : Sharanya Chandran and R. Amritha Shruti Radhakrishnan, have conceptualised a tribute in dance to their teacher Geeta Chandran’s  40 Years of Dance. The event marking 40 Years of the spectacular dancing career of Geeta Chandran will be held on 19 November Stein Auditorium, India Habitat Centre, in the capital.Samyukta literally means ‘united’ or ‘together’;  and in the performance they have conceptualised and choreographed, both dancers explore the concept of Samyukta through a unique, eclectic approach – keeping the Bharatanatyam Nritta or grammar as the base, and building on it to explore new movements through a reactive approach – in an attempt to create beauty and an original notion of symmetry, by reacting to the rhythm and music. This performance sees them exploring the build-up of movement vis-a vis music and space – reaching a high point, which is immediately followed by quieter/ more introspective movements, which again work their way up before they begin to explore the quiet yet again. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Daughter and disciple of Chandran, Sharanya has been learning Bharatanatyam since age four, both from her mother and Guru K N Dakshinamurthi. She presented her formal solo debut performance, the Arangetram, in New Delhi in November 2001, at age 13. It is her endeavour and passion to learn, invent and conceptualise new additions to the classical dance repertoire. Sharanya is also a development and policy expert. Amritha has been learning dance since over 16 years, having presented her formal solo performance, the Arangetram, in New Delhi in December 2010. She received the Scholarship for Young Artists by the Minister Of Culture, in 2013. A member of the Natyavriksha Dance Company, Amritha has extensively traveled, both in India and abroad accompanying her Guru for several SPIC MACAY lecture – demonstrations at various splaces.In her 40th year, Geeta Chandran  carries out yet again her most eloquent and powerful role as custodian and role model for younger aspirants, and with her disciples, establishes the completion of an evolving circle.last_img read more

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Merry go round for the cake

first_imgIt’s not yet Christmas, but the intoxicating aroma of the Annual Cake Mixing Ceremony at the Cafe Uno lawns of Shangri-La’s – Eros Hotel, New Delhi brought alive the rich tradition and unveiled the spirit of the festive season. Spreading the cheer along with the Chefs, the ceremony invited the participation of all media friends, corporate guests, in-house guests along with the Area Manager and General Manager Farhat Jamal, amidst tradition and fanfare dressed in typical Chefs attire of hats and aprons. Guests and colleagues together rolled up their sleeves and put their hands in the mixing pots to make the perfect Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Christmas cake. An interesting array of fruits including raisins, glazed red cherries, orange peel, tutti frutti, black currants, dates, figs, dried apricots, figs, prunes and nuts like walnuts, cashew, almond flakes and pistachio, besides spices such as ground cardamom, cinnamon and cloves were poured into a huge boat shaped cauldron. The mixing reached a spirited level when endless bottles of  liquors such as whisky, white and dark rum, vodka, gin, wine, beer and syrups like golden syrup, molasses, honey and vanilla essence were added. After the traditional cake mixing ceremony, the mixture was put into airtight bags and left to mature till around Christmas, when it will be blended with the cake batter and baked. After this traditional ceremony, the guests were invited for a pre Christmas toast at the Cafe Uno lawns.last_img read more

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CM asks to crack down on students collecting money for admissions

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has instructed police commissioner Rajeev Kumar to take stern actions against those involved in collecting money for giving admission in colleges.Kolkata Police on late Friday night arrested two persons involved in the racket. Extra police force will be deployed outside colleges where admissions are going on. Outsiders will not be allowed inside the college premises and only merit should be the criterion for admission. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedChief minister Banerjee has urged students to report to police against those who will ask for money.It may be mentioned that in the core committee meeting held at Netaji Indoor stadium recently, Mamata Banerjee had categorically said that no money should be taken from students on the pretext of providing admissions in colleges and stern actions would be taken against those involved in the matter.It was learnt that Chief Minister became furious after reports of students asking for money from freshers to get them admitted in different colleges surfaced in the media. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPIt is alleged that a student was asked to pay Rs 65,000 for a seat in Geography in a private college. Another student was asked to pay Rs 16,000 for a seat in English. Even in state-run colleges, freshers are often asked to pay money to get admission. Banerjee had repeatedly warned the student leaders in the core committee meeting about their role and that they should be helping students, rather than extorting money and if any such case is reported, then it will be dealt with seriously. Partha Chatterjee, state Education minister reiterated on Saturday that no one involved in the extortion racket will be spared. He has urged students not to give any extra money and report the matter to the police and the principal of the college against those asking for money. Copies of the complaint may be sent to the Chief Minister’s office (CMO). He said the state government is determined to break the racket and warned stern actions against those involved.For quite a some time, there have been reports of money extortion by students leaders from the freshers assuring them seats in colleges at the undergraduate level. Both Mamata Banerjee and Partha Chatterjee have warned the union leaders to stop this malpractice.Banerjee, who was an active Chatra Parishad leader, said it is the duty of the student leaders to help juniors in studies and improve the academic environment in colleges. But their requests have fallen flat. Partha Chatterjee said the Education department is determined to put an end to this malpractice and the state government will go all out to arrest those involved in the racket.last_img read more

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