Bravo, Narine star in Aussie Big Bash

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia, CMC – A tidy all-round performance from Dwayne Bravo and steady bowling from fellow West Indies Twenty20 star Sunil Narine contributed to a 49-run victory for the Melbourne Renegades over defending champions Sydney Thunder in the Big Bash League yesterday. Bravo collected 2-27 from his allotted four overs and Narine 2-32 from his four, as the Thunder, chasing 180 for victory, were bowled out in 19.1 overs in the third match of this year’s competition at the Docklands Stadium. Andre Russell, another West Indies T20 star, failed to fire with the bat again, scoring just two, as all but three of the Thunder’s batsmen fell for single figure scores to give the Renegades their first home victory since the 2014-15 season. Earlier, Bravo struck a four and two sixes in 24 from 16 balls for the Renegades, but it was their captain Aaron Finch, the Australia international, that powered their innings with three fours and four sixes in 63 from 37 balls, as the home team reached 179 for seven from their allocation of 20 overs. Russell was the most successful, if not economical Thunder bowler, grabbing 2-42 from his allotted four overs. The Thunder have a week to regroup before they host the Brisbane Heat at the Sydney Showground Stadium next Wednesday, a day before the Renegades host the Perth Scorchers at Docklands. The Big Bash League continues today with a double-header which features a contest at the WACA between the Scorchers and Adelaide Strikers, whose squad includes West Indies T20 star Kieron Pollard and Barbados-born, England all-rounder Chris Jordan.last_img read more

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‘Chopping’ Diminished for Judges, Magistrates

first_imgIssuance of criminal writs of arrest had long been a lucrative business for magistrates and judges in courtrooms across the country until Monday, August 8, when Chief Justice Francis S. Korkpor ordered the practice halted.Writs of arrest were until now commonly obtained by non-lawyers who paid fees to judges and magistrates purposely to have an individual suspected of having committed a crime arrested and jailed. In many instances, at the request of a mere plaintiff (not their lawyer), a judge or magistrate would issue a writ of arrest on a Friday afternoon and abruptly served on a “number of suspects and others to be identified”, who would have no time to assemble the bond payment, a lawyer or both to avoid spending the entire weekend in jail. This has been a regular practice, especially for a complainant aiming to spitefully inconvenience a rival party. Though Chief Justice Korkpor was not clear on the issue of judges and magistrates taking money in exchange of the writs, he ordered them to stop issuing criminal writs of arrest because it is not their responsibility to do so.Justice Korkpor sounded the warning when, for the first time as Chief Justice he attended the formal opening of Criminal Courts, A, B, C, D and E, at the Temple of Justice.He, however, said judges and magistrates under the law would issue criminal writ of arrest and indictment, but must be granted only at the request of lawyers of the Ministry of Justice.“I know that you have rights to issue the writs and indictment, but that should be done with lawyers from the MOJ and not by you alone and you don’t need to go up there looking for cases you are not party to,” Chief Justice Korkpor said.He said the Solicitor General, City Solicitor, County Attorney and Prosecuting Attorneys should ask before judges and magistrates can issue writs against suspected criminals.He said judges and magistrates must be frank to tell non-lawyers that it is not their (judge’s or magistrate’s) job to issue writ of arrest, but that of prosecutors.Justice Korkpor’s action did not go down well with some lawyers, who on Monday argued that the Chief Justice did not explain how they should handle complaints against lawyers of the MOJ.“What if a lawyer of the ministry commits an act against a non-lawyer who wants to file a client’s complaint before a writ of arrest can be served on an individual?” he wondered.According to Chief Justice Korkpor, every criminal case must be handled by government lawyers before it reaches the court.“You can’t take someone else’s interest, it is the government that should do that for the individual,” Justice Korkpor said.“You can tell the accused to go home and come the next day, if they cannot file a criminal appearance bond, or you can ask them to find a prominent person in their community as their guarantor, and send them back home,” the Chief justice explained.“I don’t want to hear anymore that you people are sending others to jail just for petty crimes. You have to learn how to use good judgment to stop sending people to jail, “the Supreme Court head maintained.Justice Korkpor said “I do not want to be a part of a system that would be considered a failed state. I hope that we all work together to avoid a failed state by letting prosecutors to enforce my order.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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BWI Receives 75 Mattresses from WLCU

first_imgMessrs Tarnue and Paye receive the first consignment of the mattresses, while others look on with excitement.The Booker Washington Institute (BWI) in Kakata, Margibi County yesterday received a donation of 75  first class ‘Prima’ mattresses from the World Lebanese Cultural Union (WLCU) for use by the school’s boarding students. The mattresses were presented to the school administration by the chairman of the Board of Governors of BWI, Jackson J. Paye.The six inch, single size mattresses made locally by the foam and mattress manufacturer, LIPFOCO, cost US$19,500. The mattresses were received with  a great deal of excitement, with the principal and chief executive officer of BWI, Harris Fomba Tarnue, in the lead, followed by Mr. Paye and his deputies for administration and student affairs.The WLCU president, Ezzat Eid, who is also a member of BWI’s Board of Governors, presented the mattresses to Mr. Paye for onward presentation to the school’s administration. “This donation from the Lebanese community is necessary because it comes at a time when the administration has been making appeals to the Board, calling on members to seek external support for the institute. The Tarnue administration wants to see BWI reach its full potential as the premier center of academic excellence,  or as it was prior to the country’s 14-year civil unrest,” Mr. Paye said.Faculty members and students formed a celebratory march which was led by the institute’s melodious choristers. Mr. Paye expressed gratitude to the WLCU, and promised that the mattresses will be used for their intended purposes.One of the hand-washing stations the Montan Foundation installed on  the campusMr. Tarnue, who later took to the podium, also expressed appreciation to the leadership of the WLCU, particularly to Mr. Eid, who represents the BWI Board at the union, for the donation.The Montan Foundation Development Aid, a not-for-profit organization, which over the weekend installed two hand-washing stations on the BWI campus were also thanked for their support.  The Montan group operates on the motto, “Helping to Meet the Needs of the Needy.”The presentation brought together a representative of the newly inducted members of the BWI Retiree Elders Council, members of the faculty and employees of LIPFOCO Mattress Company.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Holiday thoughts held for Canadian Forces

first_imgPhoto: Cadet Donovan Titley, and World War 2 veteran Bill Thompson share a candle and light a common flame of unity and peace./submittedThe Fort St. John Royal Canadian Legion hosted its annual Christmas Eve Candle Light Ceremony to recognize the men and women that have given the ultimate sacrifice to those that have served and to those that are serving in the Canadian Forces.- Advertisement -It was a time for members of the Legion, including many Veterans, to come and share stories and to celebrate the Christmas season.last_img read more

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Special prosecutor assigned to Pimm case

first_imgA special prosecutor will now be looking over evidence in the domestic dispute case involving Peace River North MLA Pat Pimm.Mark Jette is a Vancouver lawyer who has been assigned by the Criminal Justice Branch to take on the case and review all police recommendations. Jette will also determine whether charges will be laid.- Advertisement -Pimm resigned from the Liberal caucus and from his post as a parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Energy and Mines on June 27, after having spent the night in jail.He had been arrested by Fort St. John RCMP after a domestic dispute with his wife, Jody.Special Prosecutors handle cases involving high-profile people and politicians to ensure there is no perception of improper influence in the case.last_img read more

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Phil Drake: A miscue at the movies

first_imgThrough an exchange of e-mails I told him I’d like to meet him if he ever had an event at the multi-screen Pacific’s Vineland Drive-In Theatre in Industry, the last remaining drive-in movie theater in Los Angeles County (Vineland fans will tell you it’s the last drive-in in L.A. and Orange counties, which doesn’t make sense to me since we are in L.A. County). Gomez and his group (check out their neat Web site at www.socaldims.com) had a table in the snack bar March 17. I waddled in just after chatting with the manager for a story I am doing for our Living Here section that comes out in a couple months. I had never been to the Vineland. “There’s no other experience like it if you want to go see a movie and save a ton of cash,” the 45-year-old Gomez said. Gomez and his group want to preserve the last few drive-ins remaining in the area, most in San Bernardino County. • Photo Gallery: Vineland Drive-In Theatre • Video: 3/24: Pacific’s Vineland Drive-In I went to the Vineland Drive-In recently and made an ass out of myself. I don’t say that with any pride. It just seems to happen without much effort on my part. Some folks may consider it a curse. I think of it as a “gift.” About a year or so ago I came across Sal Gomez, who along with some other folks has started the Southern California Drive-In Movie Society, carrying the gauntlet of “preserving the classic drive-in movie experience in Southern California.” After a couple hours of interviews, I decided to chat with young lovers who find the drive-in to be a great place for a date. And then I saw them. A young couple who walked to the snack bar arm in arm. Oh, how they laughed and gazed at each other. “Are you on a date?” I asked the man. “No, we’re just friends,” he replied, as the girl hung even closer to him. “Well, I’m doing a story on the drive-in and I am looking for a young couple who like to go to the movies for a date,” I chortled. “Are you sure you are not dating?” “Look,” the guy said, “I’m homosexual.” Now, a piercing look of embarrassment shot across my face. Flop sweat forced what little hair I have to stick to my forehead and I began to stutter. Here’s a guy who just wanted to go to a drive-in with a friend and some overgrown moron from the paper pesters him into divulging his sexuality. “You guys have a good time,” I stammered. Whatever else I wanted to do didn’t seem important anymore so I waddled back to my truck, lit up a much-needed cigar and watched the other folks driving in to watch movies. Well, I visited the drive-in, met Sal Gomez and made an ass of myself, all in about three hours. Not a personal best. But I left with the knowledge I had tried my best. For more on the Vineland, see our video at www.whittierdailynews.com phil.drake@sgvn.com (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2110last_img read more

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Inmate dies after jail fight

first_imgLOS ANGELES (AP) — Sheriff’s officials worked Monday to transfer hundreds of county jail inmates to the state corrections system as continuing racial brawls led to the second prisoner death this month. About 200 inmates, mostly parole violaters and those awaiting transfer to state prison, have already been moved out, and another 400 were expected to be transferred this week, said Los Angeles County sheriff’s Chief Marc Klugman, head of the nation’s largest jail system. “We are in the process of getting all the prisoners we can out of here and into the state prison system,” Klugman said Monday. The latest inmate death occurred Sunday afternoon after a fight between four Hispanic and two black prisoners in a six-man cell at the downtown Men’s Central Jail. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant A 38-year-old black inmate collapsed and died after the fight. Another black inmate was killed Feb. 4 in racial fighting at the Pitchess Detention Center’s North Facility in Castaic, north of Los Angeles. In Sunday’s incident deputies broke up the fight with verbal commands, and removed the injured black prisoner when he complained of pain, Deputy Alba Yates said. While en route to the jail’s clinic, the inmate collapsed. Paramedics tried to revive him, but were unsuccessful and pronounced him dead at the scene, Yates said. Officials were not yet releasing the man’s name or more information on his injuries, Yates said. The other black inmate involved in the fight was treated for minor injures. The county jail system, which held 18,425 inmates as of Monday morning, remained on lockdown, meaning restricted movement within the jails and a loss of privileges like visiting rights, said Yates. “We are trying to stop all this fighting,” she said. Trouble continued Sunday at the Pitchess Detention Center, with two large scuffles between blacks and Hispanics, officials said. The first fight involved 92 inmates in a large dorm, with a second fight between 40 inmates breaking out a few hours later in a separate dorm, Yates said. Both were broken up with tear gas and pellet weapons known as sting balls, Yates said. Five inmates sustained minor injuries. No deputies were hurt. The Feb. 4 riot that began the current siege of trouble in the jail system involved as many as 2,000 inmates. In addition to the death, dozens were injured. Since then, smaller fights along racial lines have broken out at the Pitchess Detention Center and other jail facilities.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Five generations of family and one barn

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Including my children, five generations of the Reese family have worked and played in the old barn on my parent’s property — that is a lot of pitchforking and hay fort building.When faced with a decision about the future of this incredible, historic structure, my parents made the decision in 2010 to hire a gifted Amish crew to give it a major makeover for future generations of Reeses to continue to work and play beneath the ancient rafters of this grand old barn. Based on the saw marks on the beams, the style and the roofing material, it has been estimated that the barn was built between 1870 and 1880. Think about how Ohio agriculture has changed since then!My parents are the third generation of the Reese family to own the farm. My great-grandfather, Pearl Jay Reese, and his wife, Jessie Mae, purchased the farm in 1918. Here is more about the barn from the Hancock Historical Society.For three generations, the 1,200 square foot barn housed a dairy operation. The barn is a typical, three-bay, English ground barn, and the size and design of are reminiscent of a New England style. While some of the material is hand hewn, the smaller braces (scantlings) are circular sawn. The barn builders probably made use of some of the last old-growth material available in the area that could span the whole length of the barn as one piece of lumber. Both the plates and purlins are one piece (“one stick”). The orientation of the bracing in the barn is unique. The whitewash on the walls from the old milking parlor on the east side of the barn is still visible, and there is evidence that the milking parlor replaced an earlier grainery. The Reese barn is one of seven that will be featured on the third annual Hancock Historical Museum Historic Barn Tour on Sept. 12. The tours have proven to be a great way for non-farmers to connect with agriculture, but also a great way for modern farmers to re-connect with their agricultural heritage.This year’s tour features the oldest set of barns overall, though the area may have actually been settled later than parts of the county on previous tours. In several cases, the younger barns from earlier tours were the second barns built on the farms.Retired Hancock County Extension educator Gary Wilson was instrumental in getting the tour started and was surprised about how much he has learned about his community and heritage in the process.“This has been a look at the farm heritage here. I have learned a lot about these barns. I discovered I have one 8-inch by 8-inch beam in my barn that is 70 feet long. A neighbor has one that is 80 feet long,” Wilson said. “The Hancock Historical Museum has professionals on staff who know how to look into the records and property deeds and each barn owner on the tour gets a rundown of the history of their barns. Those things are really interesting. Many of these farm families go back several generations and these tours bring back family to see the barns. It is like a family reunion.”Wilson has learned much about his own family history in recent years, in part through the barn tour.“We have my great grandmother’s farm records from 1895 to 1928 — if they bought a pair of boots they wrote it down. They fit everything they bought for a year on a half piece of paper. They bought hardly anything,” he said. “Some years they grossed less than $400, but yet they built a house and a barn. I have the bill of sale for when they built the barn in 1905 — it cost $1,465. That was the only year they had more expenses than they had income. You couldn’t just go to Ag Credit and get an operating loan in those days. They just used what they had.”Because of the value of the tour for local farming, the area’s agricultural community has been very supportive of the tour in terms of sponsorships. Sponsors for the event include the Hancock County Farm Bureau, Ag Credit, Findlay Implement, Legacy Cooperative, Advanced Drainage Systems, Inc., and Archbold Equipment Co. Other sponsors are Citizens National Bank, Reineke Family Dealerships, and Findlay-Hancock County Convention & Visitors Bureau.Ultimately, the inherent appeal of the barns attracts the initial attention for tour goers, but it is what can be learned about the people who built the amazing structures and their descendants that really resonates with those on the tour. Those dynamic craftsmen from yesteryear left their legacy in the timbers and the ingenuity that has defied the elements and laws of nature for generations.“Everybody can trace themselves back to the farm. When you go back, that barn was the centerpiece of the farm. It was the first place you went and the last place you left every day. Those days have changed, but many people are still using them on the farm and some people have kept them up,” Wilson said. “They built things to last back then and they didn’t use nails and screws and bolts. They didn’t have engineers with graduate degree or blueprints. They didn’t have rulers — just something similar to a framing square. They cut out sticks of certain lengths for measuring. It was just common sense based on knowledge that had been passed down from their fathers. It is fascinating to think about how these barns were built.”Today that craftsmanship provides glimpses into a lifestyle that is hard for us to imagine. Some say those were the good old days, though a look at the harsh realities that had to be endured back then may encourage you to think otherwise. Either way, the ghosts of our forefathers inhabiting Ohio’s rural barns offer something people are looking for — insight into a way of life that is tough to fathom, but fascinating to contemplate.The third annual Historic Barn Tour on Saturday, Sept. 12 from 10-4. It is a self-guided tour of seven historic barns in western Hancock County. Pre-sale tickets for $10 are available at the Hancock Historical Museum and sponsor locations in Findlay. Tickets can be purchased online at http://historicbarntour.brownpapertickets.com. For more information and a map of the tour, visit hancockhistoricalmuseum.org or call 419-423-4433.last_img read more

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Microsoft & Nokia to Announce Mobile Version of Office

first_imgCognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Related Posts Tags:#enterprise#news#Products Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… IT + Project Management: A Love Affaircenter_img 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now steven walling For those who’ve bemoaned the lack of cross-platform mobile support for Microsoft Office, a ray of hope is on the horizon. Microsoft is expected to announce tomorrow a partnership with Nokia to include Office support on its mobile devices. Currently the only devices that have native versions of Microsoft Office are those running Windows Mobile. This deal could see that change for the first time. No confirmation of details has been provided, but it’s likely that this mobile version will be an accompaniment to Office 2010, along with the Web-based suite. Many enterprise users are still devoted to Microsoft in the office suite space, but SaaS competitors like Zoho and Google have begun to emerge as a serious threat. By adding flexibility and ease of access — including through cross-platform mobile support — these services have enticed users who can’t afford to be tied to the desktop. But Office 2010 is showing more and more promise. The release is currently in a limited beta, but features such as the free Web-based version just might reassert Microsoft’s dominance. Microsoft representatives are being tight-lipped until tomorrow’s press conference, but it’s clear from the invitation that a major alliance between the two companies is what’s in the works. Look for an update tomorrow morning after we hear more on the details.last_img read more

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Full Text Preview of O’Reilly’s Up and Running with Node.js Now Available

first_imgYou can now preview the entirety of Up and Running with Node.js by Tom Hughes-Croucher. O’Reilly Media is making the book available as part of its Open Feedback Publishing System (OFPS) while Hughes-Croucher finishes the book. “I’m going to be updating it every two weeks with the first update slated for next week,” he says. Readers are encouraged to leave comments and feedback. The book is a general introduction to Node.js, from installation to building applications.Hughes-Croucher is chief evangelist at Node.js sponsor company Joyent. Before that he was a technical evangelist at Yahoo. Prior to this release, he published a free PDF of the first 20 pages of the book.From the Author’s Note:When Simon, my editor, and I were initially discussing this project it was obvious how vibrant the Node.js community is. We felt that it was important that we engaged with the community as we worked on this manuscript. In order to do that we decided to release the book in parts as I wrote it. What you are reading now is one of those partial releases.What you’ll find within this first release is not necessarily the final work that we will publish. We hope by making this book available as it’s written we’ll get your feedback, ideas and thoughts on what I’ve already written and what else we should be covering. Not only that, but Node is growing almost faster than I can keep up with it. Not to mention the community modules which are growing even faster than that. Before we go to press we’ll make sure that the information in the text is up to date with the latest version of Node, and that we haven’t missed any critical contributions from the community that need to be covered.According to the OFPS help page:The Open Feedback Publishing System (OFPS) is an O’Reilly experiment that tries to bridge the gap between private manuscripts and public blogs. Following on the let-them-comment-on-everything model established by the Django Book, Real World Haskell, and Mercurial: The Definitive Guide (among others), OFPS allows readers to read in-progress O’Reilly manuscripts, communicate suggestions with the authors, follow others’ comments, and directly participate in the development of new books.Mastering Node.js is another free book on the subject. It’s available on Github in PDF, ePub, Mobi and HTML formats. 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Tags:#hack#How To Related Posts Why You Love Online Quizzescenter_img How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? klint finley Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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